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^ERFORD COLLEGE BULLETIN 





••| SUGGEST that you preach truth and do 
I righteousness as you have been taught, 

whereinsoever that teaching may commend itself to 
your consciences and your judgments. For your 
consciences and your judgments we have not sought to 
bind; and see you to it that no other institution, no 
political party, no social circle, no religious organization, 
no pet ambitions put such chains on you as would 
tempt you to sacrifice one Iota of the moral freedom of your 
consciences or the intellectual freedom 
of your judgments." 

Tresideiit Isaac ^harpless, 
Commencement, 1888 



STATEMENT OF PURPOSE FOR HAVERFORD COLLEGE 



laverford College seeks to prepare men for lives of service, respon- 
ility, creativity, and joy, both during and after college. 

[The College shares with other liberal arts colleges of academic 
tcellence: 

— a commitment to open inquiry by both its students and faculty, 
combined with rigorous appraisal and use of the results of that 
inquiry 

— an emphasis on a broad education in the natural and social 
sciences, the humanities, and the arts, combined with strong 
competence in at least one field of the student's choosing 

— an educational program that aims more at preparing men to 
think and act clearly, boldly, and humanely in whatever life 
work they choose than at training for specific professional 
fields. 

fcThe College's distinctive character comes from its striving for: 

— candor, simplicity, joy, and moral integrity in the whole of 
college life in keeping with Haverford's Quaker traditions 

— a harmony for each man among his intellectual, physical, social, 
esthetic, and spiritual concerns 

— a creative use of smallness that places students in the closest 
contact with dedicated scholars in the pursuit of knowledge 

— a sense of community marked by a lasting concern of one per- 
son for another and by shared responsibilities for helping the 
College achieve its highest aims 

— a system of responsible self-government in the student body 
and in the faculty 

— a balance for students and faculty between disciplined involve- 
ment in the world of action and detachment to reflect on new 
and old knowledge alike. 



In sum, the College seeks to be measured, above all, by the uses to 
which its students, graduates, and faculty put their knowledge, their 
humanity, their initiative, and their individuality. 



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Haverford College Bulletin, Vol. LXVII, Number One, July 

Issued four times a year by Haverford College, Haverford, Pa. 19041. 
Entered as second-class matter and postage paid at Haverford, Pa. 



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STATEMENT OF PURPOSE 1 

COLLEGE CALENDAR, 1968-69 5 

FACULTY AND ADMINISTRATION 11 

THE COLLEGE AND ITS PROGRAM 27 

Aims and Objectives 28 

History 29 

Resources 29 

Admission 37 

Housing 40 

Expenses 40 

Financial Aid 42 

Curriculum 44 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 61 

Arts and Service Program 151 

STUDENT SERVICES AND ACTIVITIES 155 

Health Program 156 

Student Government, Honor System 157 

Student Organizations 158 

Student Publications 160 

LIST OF FELLOWSHIPS, SCHOLARSHIPS AND PRIZES . . 161 

Endowed Fellowships 162 

Endowed Scholarships 162 

Prizes 169 

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 173 

Alumni Clubs 175 

INDEX 187 




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College days in black type. 



CALENDAR 1968-1969 



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Freshmen arrive and register for Physical Education Tues. 10 

Other new students arrive Thurs. 12 

Freshmen register for courses Thurs 

Other new and re-entering students register Fri 

Returning students arrive Sat, 

Opening Collection 8:00 p.m., Sun 

First semester classes begin 8:00 a.m., Mon. 

Upperclassmen register for non-academic courses Mon. 16 

First faculty meeting 4:15 p.m., Mon. 16 

Fall Term non-academic courses begin Wed. 18 

Last day for changing courses Mon. 30 

Last day for dropping a course without penalty Mon. 14 

Last day for a junior or senior to request that no numerical grade C 

be recorded (NNG) in a course outside his major division Mon. 14 T. 

Fall Term non-academic courses end Fri. 22 |i^ 

Swarthmore Day (no classes) Sat. 23 q 

Registration for Winter Term non-academic courses Mon. 25 y_ 

Thanksgiving vacation begins 12:30 p.m.. Wed. 27 

Classes resume and Winter Term non-academic courses begin. .8:00 a.m., Mon. 2 

Registration for Spring Semester Mon. 2 through Fri. 6 D 

Midyear examination schedules due in Registrar's Office Mon., Tues. 9, 10 E 

First semester classes end — Christmas vacation begins 11 :30 a.m.. Sat., 21 C. 

All papers (except those in lieu of examinations) due by* .... 12:00 noon. Sat. 21 

Christmas vacation ends 8:00 a.m., Mon. 6 

Review period Mon., Tues., Wed., 6, 7, 8 

Midyear examinations Thurs. 9 through Sat. 18 J 

Papers in lieu of examinations (and laboratory notebooks) A 

due as scheduled by instructor, but not later than* 4:00 p.m., Wed. 15 N, 

Midyear Recess 5:00 p.m., Sat. 18 to 8:00 a.m., Mon. 27 

Second semester classes begin 8 :00 a.m., Mon. 27 

Winter Term non-academic courses end Fri. 28 FEB. 

Applications for Cope and Murray Graduate Fellowships 

due in President's Office Sat. 

Registration for Spring Term non-academic courses Mon. 

Spring Term non-academic courses begin Mon. 

Spring vacation 4:00 p.m., Thurs. 20 to 8:00 a.m., Mon. 

Sophomores' Major registration cards due in Dean's Office 4:00 p.m.. Fri. 11 f^ 

Registration for Fall Semester Mon. 14 through Fri. 18 p 

Applications for scholarships due in Admissions Office Tues. 15 p 

Final examination schedules due in Registrar's Office Mon., Tues. 21, 22 



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Prize competition manuscripts due in Registrar's Office 4:00 p.m., Thurs. 1 

Spring Term non-academic courses end Fri. 9 

Second semester classes end 1 1 :30 a.m., Sat. 10 

All papers (except those in lieu of examinations) due by* .... 12:00 noon. Sat. 10 

Review period Sun., Mon. 11,12 

Senior comprehensive examinations Tues. 13 through Thurs. 15 M 

Final examinations for Seniors Wed. 14 through 12:00 noon. Wed. 21 A 

Final examinations for all other students Wed. 14 through Sat. 24 Y 

Papers in lieu of examinations (and laboratory notebooks) 

due as scheduled by instructor, but no later than* 4:00 p.m.. Tues. 20 

Oral examinations for College honors Mon.. Tues.. Wed. 19, 20. 21 

Final faculty meeting 9:00 a.m., Thurs. 22 

COMMENCEMENT Tues. 27 



SPECIAL SATURDAY EVENTS 

Homecoming Day — Oct. 26 Parents' Day — Nov. 16 Alumni Day — May 3 

*For severe academic penalties applied to late papers and notebooks, see Page 55. 



AIMD 

ADMIIMISTRATIOIM 




FACULTY 

John R. Coleman President 

B.A., University of Toronto; M.A., and Ph.D., University of Chicago; LL.D., 
Beaver College; LL.D., University of Pennsylvania. 

EMERITI 

Hugh Borton President, Emeritus 

B.S., Haverford College; A.M., Columbia University; Ph.D., University of 
Leyden; LL.D., Temple University; LL.D., University of Pennsylvania. 

Thomas E. Drake Professor of American History, Emeritus 

A.B., Stanford University; A.M., University of Michigan; Ph.D., Yale 
University. 

Martin Foss Lecturer in Philosophy , Emeritus 

LL.D., University of Jena. 

Clayton W. Holmes Professor of Engineering, Emeritus 

B.S. in M.E. and M.E., University of New Hampshire; M.A., Haverford 
College. 

Archibald Macintosh . . . .Vice President and Director of Admissions, Emeritus 
B.A., Haverford College; A.M., Columbia University; Ph.D., University of 
Pennsylvania; LL.D., Haverford College. 

Cletus O. Oakley Professor of Mathematics, Emeritus 

S.B., University of Texas; S.M., Brown University; Ph.D., University of 
Illinois. 

Abraham Pepinsky Professor of Psychology, Emeritus 

A.B. and A.M., University of Minnesota; Ph.D., State University of Iowa. 

Harry W. Pfund Professor of German, Emeritus 

B.A., Haverford College; A.M. and Ph.D., Harvard University. 

L. Arnold Post Professor of Greek, Emeritus 

B.A., M.A. and L.H.D., Haverford College; A.M., Harvard University; B.A. 
and M.A., Oxford University. 

Ira De A. Reid Professor of Sociology, Emeritus 

A.B. and LL.D., Morehouse College; A.M., University of Pittsburgh; Ph.D., 
Columbia University; LL.D., Haverford College. 

Leon H. Rittenhouse Professor of Engineering, Emeritus 

M.E., Stevens Institute of Technology. 

Edv^ard D. Snyder Professor of English, Emeritus 

A.B., Yale University; A.M. and Ph.D., Harvard University. 

Douglas Van Steere T. Wistar Brown Professor of Philosophy , Emeritus 

S.B., Michigan State College; B.A. and M.A., Oxford University; A.M. and 
Ph.D., Harvard University; D.D., Lawrence College; L.H.D., Oberlin College; 
L.H.D., Earlham College. 

Alfred J. Swan Professor of Music, Emeritus 

B.A. and M.A., Oxford University. 

12 



PROFESSORS 

Manuel J. Asensio Professor of Romance Languages 

B.A., University of Granada; M.A. and Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania. 

John Ashmead, Jr Professor of English 

A.B., A.M. and Ph.D., Harvard University. 

Edward BAXSONt Visiting Professor of Sociology 

B.Sc, London School of Economics. 

Richard J. Bernstein Professor of Philosophy 

A.B., University of Chicago; B.S., Columbia University; M.A. and Ph.D., 

Yale University. 

Edwin B. Bronner Professor of Histoiy 

A.B., Whittier College; M.A., Haverford College; Ph.D., University of 
Pennsylvania. 

William E. Cadbury, Jr Director, Post-Baccalaureate 

Fellowship Program and Professor of Chemistiy 
B.S. and M.A., Haverford College; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania. 

Howard Comfort** Professor of Classics 

B.A., Haverford College; A.M. and Ph.D., Princeton University. 

Frances De Graaff Professor of Russian 

Ph.D., University of Leyden. on joint appointment with Bryn Mawr College 

Paul J. R. Desjardins Professor of Philosophy 

B.A., M.A. and Ph.D., Yale University. 

William Docherty, Jr Professor of Physical Education and 

S.B., Temple University. Director of Physical Education 

Frank S. Fussner Visiting Professor of History 

B.S., M.A. and Ph.D., Harvard University. 

Louis C. Green**** Professor of Astronomy 

A.B., A.M. and Ph.D., Princeton University. 

Marcel M. Gutwirth Professor of Romance Languages 

A.B., Columbia College; A.M. and Ph.D., Columbia University. 

A. Paul Hare Professor of Sociology 

B.A., Swarthmore College; B.S., Iowa State University; M.A., University of 
Pennsylvania; Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

Douglas H. Heath*** Professor of Psychology 

A.B., Amherst College; A.M. and Ph.D., Harvard University. 

Theodore B. Hetzel Professor of Engineering 

B.S., Haverford College; B.S. in M.E., University of Pennsylvania; M.S. and 
Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University. 

Holland Hunter Professor of Economics 

B.S., Haverford College; A.M. and Ph.D., Harvard University. 

tOn appointment for first semester, 1968-69. 
**0n sabbatical leave, second semester, 1968-69. 
***On sabbatical leave, 1968-69. 
****On sabbatical leave in residence, 1968-69. 

13 



John A. Lester, Jr Professor of English 

B.S., Haverford College; A.M. and Ph.D., Harvard University. 

Ariel G. Loewy*** Professor of Biology 

B.S. and M.S., McGill University; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania. 

Wallace T. MacCaffrey*** Walter D. and Edith M. L. Scull 

Professor of English Constitutional History 
A.B., Reed College; A.M. and Ph.D., Harvard University. 

Colin F. MacKay Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., University of Notre Dame; M.S. and Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

Frank J. Quinn Professor of English 

B.A., M.A. and B.Litt., Oxford University. 

Roy E. Randall Professor of Physical Education and 

Director of Intercollegiate Athletics 
Ph.B., Brown University. 

William H. Reese Professor of Music and Director of Glee Club 

A.B., Amherst College; M.A., Columbia University; Ph.D., University of 
Berlin. 

Edgar S. Rose Professor of English 

A.B., Franklin and Marshall College; A.M. and Ph.D., Princeton University. 

Mel YIN Santer Professor of Biology 

B.S., St. John's University; M.S., University of Massachusetts; Ph.D., George 
Washington University. 

Ralph M. Sargent Francis B. Gummere Professor of English 

A.B., Carleton College; Ph.D., Yale University. 

Alfred W. Satterthv^aite Professor of English 

A.B., A.M. and Ph.D., Harvard University. 

Fay Ajzenberg-Selove Professor of Physics 

B.S.E., University of Michigan; M.S. and Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 

Howard M. Teaf, Jr Professor of Economics 

B.S. in Economics, M.A. and Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania. 

Craig R. Thompson*** Professor of English and History 

A.B., Dickinson College; A.M. and Ph.D., Princeton University; Litt.D., 
Dickinson College. 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 

Thomas A. Benham Associate Professor of Engineering 

B.S. and M.S., Haverford College. 

Robert H. Butman Director of Drama with rank of Associate 

Professor on joint appointment with Bryn Mawr College 
B.A. and M.A., University of North Carolina. 



**0n sabbatical leave, second semester, 1968-69. 
***0n sabbatical leave, 1968-69. 



14 



John R. Cary Associate Professor of German 

B.A., Haverford College; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University. 

John P. Chesick Associate Professor of Chemistiy 

B.S., Purdue University; Ph.D., Harvard University. 

Bradford Cook Associate Professor of French 

B.A., Williams College; Ph.D., Yale University. 

William C. Davidon Associate Professor of Physics 

B.S., M.S. and Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

John H. Davison Associate Professor of Music 

B.A., Haverford College; A.M., Harvard University; Ph.D., University of 
Rochester. 

Harmon C. Dunathan Associate Professor of Chemistry 

B.A., Ohio Wesleyan University; M.S. and Ph.D., Yale University. 

Irving Finger Associate Professor of Biology 

B.A., Swarthmore College; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania. 

Daniel J. Gillis Associate Professor of Classics 

B.A., Harvard University; M.A. and Ph.D., Cornell University. 

Harvey Glickman Associate Professor of Political Science 

Director of African Studies 
A.B., Princeton University; A.M. and Ph.D., Harvard University. 

Dale H. Husemoller*** Associate Professor of Mathematics 

B.A., University of Minnesota; A.M. and Ph.D., Harvard University. 

L. Aryeh Kosman*** Associate Professor of Philosophy 

B.A. and M.A., University of California; Ph.D., Harvard University. 

Roger Lane Associate Professor of History 

B.A., Yale University; Ph.D., Harvard University. 

Seymour J. MandelbaumI Visiting Associate Professor of History 

A.B., Columbia University; A.M. and Ph.D., Princeton University. 

Edward M. Michael Associate Professor of Classics 

B.A., M.A. and Ph.D., University of Michigan. 

Douglas G. Miller Associate Professor of Physics 

A.B., Yale University; Ph.D., University of Rochester. 

Sidney I. Perloe Associate Professor of Psychology 

B.A., New York University; Ph.D., University of Michigan. 

Ernest J. Prudente Associate Professor of Physical Education 

B.S. in Ed. and M.S., University of Pennsylvania. 

Gerhard E. Spiegler Provost and Associate Professor of Religion 

D.B., M.A. and Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

John P. Spielman, Jr Associate Professor of History 

B.A., University of Montana; M.A. and Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 

tOn appointment for first semester, 1968-69. 
***0n sabbatical leave, 1968-69. 

15 



ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 

Edward F. Bauer Assistant Professor of German 

B.A., St. John's College; M.A., Vanderbilt University; Ph.D., Princeton 
University. 

Francis X. Connolly Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., Fordham University; M.S. and Ph.D., University of Rochester. 

Thomas J. D'Andrea Assistant Professor of Psychology 

B.A. and Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 

AsoKA Gangadean Assistant Professor of Philosophy 

B.A., City College of New York; Ph.D., Brandeis University. 

Robert M. Gavin, Jr Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

B.A., St. John's University; Ph.D., Iowa State University. 

Linda G. Gerstein Assistant Professor of History 

B.A. and M.A., Radcliffe College; Ph.D., Harvard University. 

Samuel Gubins Assistant Professor of Economics 

A.B., Reed College. 

Richard P. Jayne Assistant Professor of German 

A.B. and M.A., University of California, Berkeley. 

Robert H. Kane Assistant Professor of Philosophy 

on the Sloan Foundation Grant 
B.A., Holy Cross College; Ph.D., Yale University. 

Dietrich Kessler Assistant Professor of Biology 

B.A., Swarthmore College; M.S. and Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 

David Kraines Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

B.A., Oberlin College; Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley. 

ViCKi W. Kramer Assistant Professor of English 

B.A., Wellesley College; M.A., Radcliffe College; Ph.D., Harvard University. 

Yehouda Landau Visiting Assistant Professor of Philosophy 

B.A., M.A. and Ph.D., Hebrew University. 

J. Bruce Long Assistant Professor of Religion 

B.A., Taylor University; M.A. and Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

Wyatt MacGaffey Assistant Professor of Anthropology 

B.A., M.A., University of Cambridge; Ph.D., University of California, Los 
Angeles. 

Robert A. Mortimer Assistant Professor of Political Science 

B.A., Wesleyan University; M.A. and Ph.D., Columbia University. 

James C. Ransom Assistant Professor of English 

B.A., University of New Mexico; M.A. and Ph.D., Yale University. 

Richard R. Raskin Assistant Professor of French 

B.A., Dartmouth College; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University. 

Bruce N. Robinson Assistant Professor of Economics 

and Administrative Assistant to the President 
B.A., Dillard University; M.A. . 

16 



Harry Rosenzweig Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; M.S., University of Arizona; 
Ph.D., University of Virginia. 

Preston B. Rowe Assistant Professor of Psychology 

A.B., Dartmouth College; Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 

GusTAV A. Sayer Assistant Professor of Physics 

on the Sloan Foundation Grant 
B.A., Columbia University; Ph.D., University of Maryland. 

Michael K. Showe Assistant Professor of Biology 

B.A., Haverford College; Ph.D., University of California, San Diego. 

Sara M. Shumer Assistant Professor of Political Science 

A.B., Barnard College; M.A., University of California, Berkeley. 

Peter R. J. Slater Assistant Professor of Religion 

B.A., McGill University; B.A. and M.A., Cambridge University; Ph.D., 
Harvard University. 

JosiAH D. Thompson, Jr Assistant Professor of Philosophy 

B.A., M.A. and Ph.D., Yale University. 

Walter J. Trela Assistant Professor of Physics 

on the Sloan Foundation Grant 
B.S., Brown University; Ph.D., Stanford University. 

SroNEY R. Waldman§ Assistant Professor of Political Science 

A.B., Oberlin College; Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 

Paul E. Wehr Assistant Professor of Sociology 

Director of the Center for Research on Nonviolent Conflict Resolution 

B.A., University of Connecticut; M.A., University of North Carolina; Ph.D., 

University of Pennsylvania. 

Edward Yarosh Assistant Professor of Biology 

on the Sloan Foundation Grant 
B.A., Yale University; Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 

Oliver C. Zafiriou Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

B.A., Oberlin College; M.A. and Ph.D., Johns Hopkins. 

LECTURERS AND INSTRUCTORS 

Harold Boatrite Lecturer in Music 

D.Mus., Combs College of Music. 

Ting Shih Chia Visiting Lecturer in Philosophy 

LL.B., Soochow University; A.M., and LL.M., Harvard University. 

Helen M. Hunter Lecturer in Economics 

B.A., Smith College; Ph.D., Radcliffe College. 

Samuel T. LACHSt Visiting Lecturer in Religion 

B.A., University of Pennsylvania; M.H.L., The Jewish Theological Seminary; 
Ph.D., Dropsie College. 



§0n leave of absence, 1968-69. 

tOn appointment for the first semester, 1968-69. 



17 



Richard J. Lubarsky Lecturer in English 

B.A., Swarthmore College; M.A., University of Pennsylvania. 

Maria F. Marshall Lecturer in German 

Diplom-Psychologin, University of Munich. 

Mark Oxman Lecturer in Fine Arts and Artist in Residence 

Doris S. Quinn Lecturer in English 

B.A. and M.A., Oxford University. 
Therese C. Rawson Instructor in French 

B.A., Lycee Victor Duruy; Licence es Lettres in English, Sorbonne. 
Jeannette Ringold Instructor in French 

B.A., Sophie Newcomb College; M.A., Columbia University. 

Grace Simpson, F.S.A.tt Visiting Lecturer in Classics 

Diploma, London University; D.Phil., Oxford University. 

James L. Vaughan Lecturer in Psychology 

B.A., Earlham College; B.D., Yale Divinity School; M.S., Yale University. 

Joseph Yeager Instructor in Mathematics 

M.A., University of Pennsylvania. 

SPECIAL APPOINTMENTS 

John E. Butler Assistant in Biology 

Thomas Davis Assistant to the Science Departments 

Adolph T. Dioda Artist 

Sylvia Glickman Associate in Music 

B.S. and M.Sc, Juilliard School of Music; L.R.A.M., Royal Academy of 

Music. 
Elizabeth U. Green Research Associate in Biology 

A.B., M.A. and Ph.D., Bryn Mawr College. 

Fritz Janschka Artist in Residence, Bryn Mawr College 

Akademie der Bildenden Kiinste, Vienna. 

Mary Hoxie Jones Research Associate in Quaker Studies 

A.B., Mt. Holyoke College. 

Judith K. Katz Counselor 

B.A., Temple University; M.A., University of Michigan. 

George Kusel Assistant in the Non-Academic Program 

James Livingston Assistant in Chemistry 

B.A., University of Minnesota. 

Hazel C. Pugh Supervisor of the Computing Center 

Sara Shane Research Assistant in Biology 

B.A., Swarthmore College. 
Dana Swan, II Head Football Coach 

B.A., Swarthmore College. 
James L. Vaughan Counselor 

B.A., Earlham College; B.D., Yale Divinity School; M.S., Yale University. 

ttOn appointment for the second semester, 1968-69. 

18 



APPOINTMENTS UNDER SPECIAL GRANTS 

Mabel M. Chen Research Associate in Astronomy 

B.S., The National Taiwan University; M.A. and Ph.D., Bryn Mawr College. 

Linda J. Dil worth Research Assistant in Biology 

Carol C. Heller Research Assistant in Biology 

B.A., Wilson College. 

Eleanor K. Kolchin Research Associate in Astronomy 

B.A., Brooklyn College. 

Cecily D. Littleton Research Associate in Astronomy 

B.A. and B.Sc, Oxford University. 

Slavica S. Matacic Research Associate in Biology 

M.S. and Ph.D., University of Zagreb. 

ViviANNE T. Nachmias Research Associate in Biology 

B.A., Swarthmore College; M.A., Radcliffe College; M.D., University of 
Rochester. 

Ursltla Santer Research Associate in Biology 

B.A., Swarthmore College; M.S. and Ph.D., Yale University. 

Allen G. Shenstone Research Associate in Astronomy 

B.S., M.A., Ph.D., Princeton University; B.A., M.A., Cambridge University. 

Josephine R. Smith Research Assistant in Biology 

B.S., The Pennsylvania State College. 

Ethel M. Spiegler Research Assistant in Biology 

B.A., Baptist Missionary Training School. 

Grace M. Stoddard Teaching and Research Assistant in Biology 

B.A., University of North Carolina; M.A., Washington University. 

ADMINISTRATION 

John R. Coleman President 

B.A., University of Toronto; M.A. and Ph.D., University of Chicago; LL.D., 
Beaver College; LL.D., University of Pennsylvania. 

William W. Ambler Director of Admissions 

B.A., Haverford College. 
William F. Balthaser Director of Public Relations 

B.S., Temple University. 
Elmer J. Bogart Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds 

Temple University Technical Institute. 

William E. Cadbury, Jr Director, Post-Baccalaureate 

Fellowship Program 
B.S. and M.A., Haverford College; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania. 

George N. Couch Public Relations Associate 

B.A., Haverford College. 

Janet Henry Administrative Aide to the Distinguished 

Visitors & Library Committee 

Ruth V. T. Hope Secretary to the President 

B. Mus., Westminster College. 

19 



Virginia H. Kline Registrar 

Albert J. Levine Associate Director for Development 

B.A., Hunter College. 

James W. Lyons Dean of Students 

A.B., Allegheny College; M.S. and Ed.D., Indiana University. 

Charles Perry Associate Director for Development 

B.A., Haverford College; M.S.S., Bryn Mawr College. 
David Potter Associate Dean 

B.A., Haverford College; Ed.M., Temple University. 
Bruce N. Robinson Assistant to the President 

B.A., Dillard University; M.A. and Ph.D., University of Oklahoma. 

William A. Shafer, Jr Assistant Director of Admissions 

B.A., Haverford College. 

William E. Sheppard, II Director of Alumni Affairs 

B.S., Haverford College. 

Charles W. Smith Business Manager and Comptroller 

A.C.A., Institute of Chartered Accountants; A.C.I.A., Chartered Institute of 
Secretaries; CPA. 

Gerhard E. Spiegler . . . .Provost and Director of the Margaret Gest Program 
D.B., M.A. and Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

Charles C. Waldt Office Manager in the Office of the Comptroller 

B.A., Philadelphia College of Bible. 

Albert F. Wallace Vice-President for Development 

B.A., Washington and Jefferson College. 

John A. Williams Assistant Director of Admissions 

B.A., Haverford College. 

Gertrude M. Wonson Secretary to the Director of Admissions 

B.A., Simmons College. 

MEDICAL STAFF 

William W. Lander Physician 

B.S., Ursinus College; M.D., University of Pennsylvania. 
Peter G. Bennett Psychiatrist 

B.A., Haverford College; M.D., University of Pennsylvania. 

Louise Anastasi Head Nurse 

R.N., Philadelphia General Hospital; B.S.N., Hunter College. 

LIBRARY STAFF 

Craig R. Thompson§ Librarian 

B.A., Dickinson College; M.A. and Ph.D., Princeton University; Litt.D., 

Dickinson College. 
Edwin B. Bronner Curator, Quaker Collection 

B.A., Whittier College; M.A., Haverford College; Ph.D., University of 

Pennsylvania. 

Ruth H. Reese Assistant Librarian, Technical Services 

B.A., Acadia University; B.S. (L.S.), Simmons College. 

§ Absent on leave, 1968-1969. 

20 



Esther R. Ralph Assistant Librarian, Reader Services 

B.S., West Chester State College; B.S. (L.S.), Drexel Institute of Technology. 

Else Goldberger Acquisitions Librarian 

Ph.D., University of Vienna. 

M. Constance Hyslop Cataloger and Government Documents Librarian 

B.A., Mount Holyoke College; M.A., University of Pennsylvania; M.S. 
(L.S.), Drexel Institute of Technology. 

Mae E. Craig Senior Cataloger 

B.A., Mount Holyoke College; B.S. (L.S.), Simmons College. 

Bjorg Miehle Circulation Librarian 

University of Oslo; Graduate, Norvv'egian State Library School; B.S. (L.S.), 
Drexel Institute of Technology. 

Shirley Stowe Reference Librarian 

B.A., Radcliffe College; M.S. (L.S.), Drexel Institute of Technology. 

Maria Kunycia Cataloger 

M.Ph., University of Poznan; M.S. (L.S.), Drexel Institute of Technology. 

Rhona Ovedoff Cataloger 

B.A., Dip. Lib., University of the Witwatersrand. 

William F. Brinton Cataloger 

B.S., Haverford College; Columbia University. 

Sylvia Schnaars Serials Librarian 

B.A., Ohio Wesleyan University; M.S. (L.S.), Villanova University. 

SUMMER PROGRAMS 

Helen M. Hunter Director, Summer Programs 

B.A., Smith College; M.A. and Ph.D., Radcliffe College. 

HAVERFORD SUMMER LANGUAGE INSTITUTE 

Katrin T. Bean Assistant in German 

B.A., Rockford College; M.A. and Ph.D., Bryn Mawr College. 

John R. Cary Associate Professor of German 

B.A., Haverford College; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University. 

Maria Marshall Assistant in German 

Diplom-Psychologin, University of Munich. 

Robert Roza Visiting Assistant Professor of French 

B.A., University of Toronto; M.A. and Ph.D., Princeton University. 

Richard Terdiman Assistant in French 

B.A., Amherst College; Ph.D., Yale University. 

Francoise Weil Assistant in French 

licence d'Anglais; D.E.S. Anglais; C.A.P.E.S. d' Anglais, Sorbonne. 

HAVERFORD CHAMBER MUSIC CENTER 

Sylvia Glickman Musical Director 

B.S. and M.Sc, Juilliard School of Music; L.R.A.M., Royal Academy of 
Music. 

21 



Joseph Castaldo Composer-in-Residence 

B.M. and M.M., Philadelphia Conservatory of Music. 

Patricia H. Lane Administrative Assistant 

B.S., Boston State College. 

Francis de Pasquale Member of the Quartet-in-Residence 

Cellist, Philadelphia Orchestra; Member, de Pasquale Quartet. 

Joseph de Pasquale Member of the Quartet-in-Residence 

Diploma, Curtis Institute of Music; Violist, Philadelphia Orchestra; Member, 
de Pasquale Quartet. 

Robert de Pasquale Member of the Quartet-in-Residence 

New School of Music; Violinist, Philadelphia Orchestra; Member, de Pasquale 
Quartet. 

William de Pasquale Member of the Quartet-in-Residence 

Violinist, Philadelphia Orchestra; Member, de Pasquale Quartet; Concert 
Master, Philadelphia Orchestra for Robin Hood Dell Summer Concerts. 

Elie Siegmeister Composer-in-Residence 

B.A., Columbia University. 

Alfred Swan Composer-in-Residence 

B.A. and M.A., Oxford University. 

HAVERFORD SUMMER POST-BACCALAUREATE PROGRAM 

John Van Brunt Resident Tutor 

B.A., Haverford College. 

Robert M. Gavin, Jr Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

B.A., St. John's University; Ph.D., Iowa State University. 

Dietrich Kessler Assistant Professor of Biology 

B.A., Swarthmore College; M.S. and Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 

RoMONA Livingston Visiting Instructor in English 

B.A., William Jewell College. 

Ursula V. Santer Visiting Assistant Professor of Biology 

B.A., Swarthmore College; M.S. and Ph.D., Yale University. 

Joseph Yeager Instructor in Mathematics 

M.A., University of Pennsylvania. 

HAVERFORD SUMMER INSTITUTE OF AFRICAN STUDIES 

Harvey Glickman Co-Director 

A.B., Princeton University; A.M. and Ph.D., Harvard University. 

Robert A. Mortimer Co-Director 

B.A., Wesleyan University; M.A. and Ph.D., Columbia University. 

Wyatt MacGaffey Assistant Professor of Anthropology 

B.A., M.A., University of Cambridge; Ph.D., University of California, Los 
Angeles. 

James Sanzare Visiting Lecturer in Social Studies Education 

B.A., LaSalle College; M.A., Villanova University. 

22 



VISITING FACULTY ON SPECIAL FUNDS 1967-68 



WILLIAM PYLE 

J. Frank Adams 

Professor of Mathematics 
University of Manchester, England 

Bernard W. Agranoff 

Coordinator of Biological Sciences 
University of Michigan Mental 
Health Institute 

Donald Anderson 

Associate Professor of Mathematics 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

Michael Atiyah 

Professor of Mathematics 
Oxford University and 

Institute for Advanced Study 

Richard Brauer 

Professor of Mathematics 
Harvard University 

Edgar H. Brookes 

Former Senator, Union of South 

Africa Parliament 
Representing Natal and Zululand 

Lord Caradon 

Permanent Representative 
United Kingdom Mission to the 
United Nations 

Seymour Chatman 
Professor of Speech 
University of California, Berkeley 

Melvin J. Cohen 
Professor of Biology 
University of Oregon 

Robert Coles, M.D. 
Child Psychiatrist 
Harvard University Health Services 

James W. Cronin 
Professor of Physics 
Princeton University 

William M. Fairbank 

Professor of Physics 

Stanford University 
George L. Gerstein 

Associate Professor of Biophysics 

Johnson Foundation 

University of Pennsylvania 



PHILIPS FUND 

Garl Gustav Hempel 

Stuart Professor of Philosophy 
Princeton University 

J. H. Hexter 

Professor of History 
Yale University 

F. E. P. Hirzebruch 

Professor of Mathematics 
Bonn University, Germany 

Heinz Hope 

Swiss Federal Institute of Technology 
Zurich 

Lars Hormander 

Professor of Mathematics 
Institute for Advanced Study 
Princeton 

Clyde A. Hutchison, Jr. 

Eisendrath Professor of Chemistry 
Enrico Fermi Institute for Nuclear 

Studies 
University of Chicago 

Eduard Kellenberger 

Institute of Molecular Biology 
Universite de Geneve, Switzerland 

Daniel E. Koshland, Jr. 
Professor of Biochemistry 
University of California, Berkeley 

Leif Kristensen 

Professor of Mathematics 
Aarhus University, Denmark 

Gerard P. Kuiper 

Lunar and Planetary Laboratory 
University of Arizona 

Arthur S. Lall 

Adjunct Professor of International 

Affairs 
Columbia University 

T. D. Lee 

Professor of Physics 
Columbia University 

Samuel R. Levin 
Professor of English 
Hunter College of the City of 
New York 



23 



WILLIAM PYLE PHILIPS FUND, Cont. 



W. N. Lipscomb 

Professor of Chemistry 
Harvard University 

Louis Lipsitz 

Associate Professor of Political 

Science 
University of North Carolina 

Ole Maaloe 

Professor of Microbiology 
University of Copenhagen, Denmark 

Albert H. Markwardt 

Professor of English and Linguistics 
Princeton University 

John C. Moore 

Professor of Mathematics 
Princeton University 

John W. Moore 

Professor of Physiology 

Duke University School of Medicine 

Earl L. Muetterties 
Research Director 
Central Research Department, 
E. I. du Pont de Nemours Co. 

Alfred Nisonoff 

Professor of Microbiology 
University of Illinois Medical Center 
Chicago 

Richard M. Ohmann 
Professor of English 
Wesleyan University 

Daniel Quillen 

Associate Professor of Mathematics 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

Joseph Raben 

Associate Professor of English 
Queens College of the 

City University of New York 

Dong-Sang Rim 

Professor of Mathematics 
University of Pennsylvania 

Hans Ris 

Professor of Zoology 
University of Wisconsin 



Allan R. Sandage 

Mt. Wilson and Palomar 

Observatories 
Pasadena 

Fred Sanger 

Laboratory of Molecular Biology 
Cambridge University, England 

Howard Schachman 

Professor of Molecular Biology 
University of California, Berkeley 

Michael Scriven 

Professor of Philosophy 
University of California, Berkeley 

Jean-Pierre Serre 

Professor of Mathematics 
College de France and Institute 
for Advanced Study 

Grace Simpson 

Tutor in Archaeology 
Oxford University, England 

Neil Smelser 

Professor of Sociology 
University of California, Berkeley 

William A. Stewart 

Center for Applied Linguistics 
Washington, D. C. 

Hans-Lukas Teuber 
Professor of Psychology 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

HiROSI TODA 

Professor of Mathematics 
Kyoto University, Japan 

Jean-Louis Verdier 

Professor of Mathematics 
University of Strasbourg, France 

Aaron Wildavsky 

Professor of Political Science 
University of California, Berkeley 

W. K. Wimsatt 

Professor of English 
Yale University 



24 



I 



SCHOLARS IN THE HUMANITIES FUND 



H. G. Gadamer 

Professor of Philosophy 
University of Heidelberg 
Germany 

P. T. Geach 

Professor of Philosophy 
University of Leeds 
England 

Geshe Gelden 
Tibetan Lamasery 
Farmingdale, New Jersey 

Alan Gowans 

Professor of Art and Art History 
University of Victoria, B. C. 

Andrew O. Jaszi 
Professor of German 
University of California, Berkeley 



P. Lal 

Professor of English 
University of Calcutta 
India 
Raymond H. McPhee 
Director of Public Affairs 
WFIL-TV, Philadelphia 

Abbot Zenkei Shibayama 
Nanzenji Zen Monastery 
Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 
Japan 

Hugh Travers Tracey 

Director, International Library 

of African Music 
Roodepoort, Transvaal 

Emily Vermeule 
Professor of Art 
Wellesley College 



MARY FARNAM BROWN FUND 

Heiko a. Oberman 

Director, Institut fUr Reformationsgeschichte der Universitat Tiibingen 
Germany 

THOMAS SHIPLEY FUND 

Harold Bloom 

Professor of English 
Yale University 

WILLIAM GIBBONS RHOADS FUND 

Robert Palmer Cheng Man-Ch'ing 

Professor of Music Painter, calligrapher, poet, teacher, 

Cornell University master of Tai-Chi-Chuan 



25 



ACADEMIC COUNCIL 

The Academic Council consists of the President as chairman; the 
Provost; the Assistant to the President as executive secretary; three 
elected divisional representatives of the faculty, one to be elected yearly; 
and the two faculty representatives to the Board. The Academic Council: 
1) appoints the standing faculty committees, 2) makes recommendations 
to the President on faculty appointments, reappointments, promotions, 
and tenure in accordance with accepted procedures, and 3) may con- 
sider matters having college-wide academic implications which are re- 
ferred to it by the President and/or by members of the Council. The 
elected members of the Academic Council for the academic year begin- 
ning September 1, 1968 are Mr. Perloe (Social Sciences), Mr. Finger 
(Natural Sciences), and Mr. Gutwirth (Humanities). 

STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE FACULTY 

(The president and provost are ex officio members of all committees.) 

Educational Policy and Admissions: Richard Bernstein, Chairman 

Robert Gavin, Roger Lane, Wyatt MacGaffey, David Potter, Edgar 
Rose, Melvin Santer 

Academic Flexibility : William Davidon, Chairman 
John Gary, David Potter, Preston Rowe 

Academic Standing: Colin MacKay, Chairman 

Robert Butman, William Davidon, Paul Hare, David Potter 

Distinguished Visitors and Library: Daniel Gillis, Chairman 
Linda Gerstein, Robert Kane, Dietrich Kessler 

Faculty Compensation : Douglas Miller, Chairman 
Bradford Cook, David Kraines, Josiah Thompson 

Faculty Research and Study: John Chesick, Chairman 
Robert Mortimer, James Ransom 

Honors and Fellowships: Thomas D'Andrea, Chairman 
John Ashmead, Sara Shumer, Walter Trela 

Non-Academic Program: Theodore Hetzel, Chairman 

Robert Butman, Paul Desjardins, Ernest Prudente 



26 



1 



THE 



AIMD ITS 
PROGRAM 




AIMS AND OBJECTIVES 

In line with its Quaker tradition, Haverford College stresses three in- 
terrelated elements in its educational philosophy. These are a high 
standard of academic performance within a broadly-based, liberal arts 
curriculum, the individual nature of this education, and the importance 
of personal ideals and moral values. High scholastic ability is a requisite 
for admission to Haverford, but heavy weight is given to the character 
of each candidate and the potential contribution he can make to the 
College community. Along with a commitment to scholarship, the 
College emphasizes the development of sound ethical judgments based 
on a clear perception of individual and social aims. 

In his academic work, each student is encouraged and expected to 
perform at a level consistent with his abilities. The more capable he is, 
the more is expected of him. He will soon discover the high value 
which the College attaches to intellectual integrity, independence of 
judgment, an imaginative grasp of the interrelationship of the branches 
of knowledge, and a capacity to carry out independent work. The 
requirements for graduation are designed to develop the ability to 
learn, to understand, and to reach sound conclusions, on the basis of 
study in each of the broad fields of human knowledge as well as by 
concentration in a single field. 

The College believes that the desirable qualities cultivated in the 
classroom and laboratory can be supplemented and strengthened by a 
sound program of non-academic courses, athletics, and extracurricular 
activities. The Arts and Service non-credit courses are designed to 
encourage interest in constructive community service and to develop 
appreciation- of beauty and certain creative skills. Athletic activities, 
including intramural and intercollegiate contests, promote physical fit- 
ness and coordination and provide opportunity for all students to 
experience the benefits of wholesome competition and team play. A 
variety of campus organizations permits each student to join with others 
in pursuing common interests. The important role of the honor system 
in student government emphasizes the value which the community 
places on individual responsibility. 

Haverford College believes that while the mastery of facts, tech- 
niques, and certain skills is important, it must be coupled with the 
desire and moral capacity to use them for worthwhile ends. It will 
continue to lay stress on the formation of moral values and personal 
ideals, not insisting on any set doctrine, but cherishing freedom of 
religious beliefs and of conscience. Such growth is fostered by the 
weekly Collections, or assemblies, where leaders from various walks of 

28 



life share with the undergraduates their diverse experiences and points 
of view. In addition, outstanding scholars frequently visit the campus 
for lectures or special classes, and have extensive personal contacts 
with students. 

At the center of the religious activity of the Society of Friends is the 
Meeting for Worship. Members of the College community gather each 
Thursday morning at Fifth Day Meeting. The majority of those attending 
are not members of the Society of Friends. This voluntary meeting 
provides an opportunity for students, faculty and administration alike 
to learn from meditative silence or from a spoken message to delineate 
and cultivate the highest moral principles, and to see themselves in their 
proper relation to their fellow men and to the totality of life. 

HISTORY 

Haverford College was founded in 1833 as the first college estab- 
lished by members of the Society of Friends in the United States. It 
was organized as an institution which would provide an "enlarged and 
liberal system of instruction" to meet the intellectual needs of "Friends 
on this continent," offering a course of instruction in science, mathe- 
matics, and classical languages "as extensive as given in any literary 
institution in this country." In those days it was modestly called Haver- 
ford School, but the intent was clear to create a center that would give 
to Friends the kind of education which other young Americans were 
receiving in the best colleges. 

The founders selected, as a site for the new College, 198 acres of 
rolling farmland in the center of the Welsh Tract, a large area origi- 
nally set apart by William Penn for Quaker immigrants from Wales. 
Today its beautifully landscaped campus, grown to 216 acres, forms 
a peaceful setting in the midst of the suburbs of Philadelphia. 

The first 40 years of Haverford's history were devoted to establishing 
policies and practices to make effective the ideals of its founders. In 
1847 it opened its doors to young men who were not Quakers, and in 
1856 it became a degree-granting institution. Although the College has 
never had any formal connection with an organized Meeting of the 
Society of Friends, its Quaker tradition continues strong. Even today, 
at least 18 of the 24 elected members of the Board of Managers must 
be members of the Society of Friends. 

RESOURCES 

The approximate market value of endowment funds and trusts of 
Haverford College is $26,000,000. The income from these funds and 

29 



the support given to the College annually by its alumni and other 
friends play significant parts in maintaining its high educational stand- 
ards and underwriting the scholarship and loan programs which help 
many of its students. 

Founders Hall, built in 1833 at a cost of $19,251.40, was known for 
years as "The College." Over the years the campus has been improved 
by the addition of dormitories and other buildings to supplement 
Founders Hall. Except for those who live at home, students live in 
dormitories or small residence houses on the campus. Similarly a large 
portion of the faculty live in houses or apartments owned by the Col- 
lege and situated on or near the campus. 

ACADEMIC BUILDINGS 

Classroom and laboratory buildings are Chase Hall, Hilles Labora- 
tory of Applied Sciences, Strawbridge Memorial Observatory, Henry S. 
Drinker Music Center, Stokes Hall, Sharpless Hall, and the Lyman 
Beecher Hall Building. Some classes are also held in Whitall Hall. 

Hilles houses the Engineering Department and contains classrooms, 
drawing rooms, a departmental library, shops, and mechanical and 
electrical laboratories. Also located there is the Haverford-Bryn Mawr 
Computer Center. This center contains an IBM 1620 computer with 
card input and output. The computer has a 60,000 decimal digit 
memory with an access time of 20 microseconds. Its speed is 1800 five- 
digit additions or 200 five-digit multiplications per second. This center 
has several key punches, a sorter, a reproducer, and a tabulator. All of 
its equipment is used by students. 

Stokes Hall provides unexcelled facilities, including classrooms and 
office space, for the Departments of Physics, Chemistry, and Mathe- 
matics. In one wing are an auditorium seating 205 persons and a science 
library with space for 20,000 volumes and current journals. 

The Physics Department is equipped for teaching and research in 
modern nuclear and atomic physics. Facilities include six general lab- 
oratories for course work, seven specialized laboratories for student- 
faculty research, and two senior thesis rooms, used exclusively by seniors 
for their major projects. The equipment includes an X-ray unit for 
powder diffraction work, a subcritical reactor containing 2.5 tons of 
uranium, a doubly shielded room for work with electromagnetic radia- 
tion, and four scanning microscopes. Student-built equipment is also 
available, such as a laser apparatus and a radio-telescope. 

Facilities for the Chemistry Department include five laboratories 
used in conjunction with formal courses, instrument and specialized 
equipment rooms, and six independent faculty research laboratories 

30 



which are used freely by students doing independent work and advanced 
projects with professors. The department has its own glass-blowing shop. 
Equipment includes a full range of recording spectro-photometers, count- 
ing equipment for radioactive tracer work, and a gas chromatography 
apparatus for general use as well as units for separate research projects. 
The physical chemistry laboratory includes a Bausch and Lomb grating 
spectrograph, high vacuum systems, and standard precision electrical 
apparatus. Mettler single pan balances are used in instructional labora- 
tories. Ground joint glassware is used in the elementary organic chem- 
istry program and in all higher courses. Grants from the National Science 
Foundation are available to students for summer research projects. 

The Mathematics Department, located on the top floor, uses several 
classrooms, some of which are equipped with desk calculators. 

Sharpless Hall houses the Departments of Biology and Psychology. 
Three floors, devoted to the Biology Department, include laboratories 
and seminar rooms with a broad spectrum of facilities for studying all 
phases of modern molecular biology. There is a large freshman-sopho- 
more laboratory, and a junior laboratory equipped to handle all aspects 
of cell biology. One entire floor is devoted to student-faculty research 
where senior students do projects in common with professors. Equip- 
ment includes animal rooms, shops for glass-blowing and wood and 
metal working, several constant temperature rooms for controlled tem- 
perature experiments, ultra-centrifuges, a high-resolution electron micro- 
scope, spectrophotometers, and a liquid scintillation counter. The depart- 
ment also has its own library and journal collection. 

The top two floors are devoted to psychology. Equipment includes 
both primate and non-primate animal quarters, animal laboratory with 
soundproofed and full-wired individual experimental rooms, a set of 
individual multi-purpose animal and human research rooms, a perception 
laboratory, a statistical laboratory, a social-personality observation lab- 
oratory with one-way mirrors, a shop, a journal library and reading 
room. In addition there is a physiological psychology and control room 
for animal operation procedures and master control panels of aU inter- 
laboratory communication channels. 

Lyman Beecher Hall Building, renovated during the past two 
years, contains modern classroom and office facilities as well as a 
permanent display of primitive art and an African Studies Room with 
book shelves, display cases for periodicals and maps, and a screen for 
showing slides. 

William J. Strawbridge Memorial Observatory is equipped with 
three equatorially mounted telescopes, a 10-inch and a 4 '/2 -inch re- 

31 



fractor, and a 6-inch reflector; a reflecting telescope with 8 -inch mirror 
and altazimuth mounting; a meridian circle telescope of 3^/4 -inch 
aperture; a zenith telescope of 2^/4 -inch aperture; a spectrohelioscope; 
an astrographic mounting provided with two 4-inch Ross lenses and a 
4-inch guiding telescope; sidereal clocks, a chronograph, and other in- 
struments. The astronomical library is housed in the observatory. 

Henry S. Drinker Music Center, located in the former home of 
William Wistar Comfort, provides offices, classrooms, and practice 
facilities for the Music Department, and houses the College's record 
collection and music library. The larger concerts are held in Roberts 
Hall where a Steinway grand and a Schlicker portable pipe organ are 
at the disposal of artists. 

THE LIBRARY 

The Haverford College Library is planned and developed with the 
primary purpose of providing the intellectual resources of books, 
periodicals, and pamphlets needed to sustain the work of the academic 
curriculum. Most of the volumes have been selected by the teaching 
faculty, and, with the exception of some special collections described 
below, the books and periodicals are all on open shelves and readily 
accessible for over one hundred hours a week during the college year. 
In the administration of the Library, the aim is to bring the resources 
of the book collection as effectively as possible into the academic life 
of the College. 

Beyond this primary purpose, the Library seeks through several col- 
lections to provide opportunities for independent research in certain 
fields. Most notable of such collections is the Quaker Collection, which 
attracts many visiting scholars each year. The Government Depository 
and International Documents Collections provide extensive resources 
for independent study in the social sciences, and there are further 
collections of autograph material, orientalia, and particularly of Ren- 
aissance literature offering similar research opportunities in other fields. 

The Haverford Library contains about 260,000 volumes, and receives 
about 1500 periodicals and serials. It is an academic library, planned 
and operated for the students and faculty of the College, but welcomes 
alumni, members of the Library Associates, and residents of the Haver- 
ford community who wish to consult materials not readily available in 
public libraries. 

The Library building, the first portion of which (the present north 
wing) was built in 1863, consists of two main parts. The older was the 
Thomas Wistar Brown Library, which incorporated successive additions 
to the original building. The new Library, completed in 1968 and named 

32 



for James P. Magill, Class of 1907, is joined to the old library. When 
the Magill Library was built, extensive alterations and improvements 
were also made to the older structure. 

The Magill Library has about 73,000 square feet of floor space, shelf 
capacity for 500,000 volumes, seating capacity for 500 persons, a fire- 
proof vault for all rare books and manuscripts, and controlled air and 
humidity. There are 260 carrels; of these, thirty are enclosed and re- 
served for faculty use and twenty-four are reserved for students who 
wish to use typewriters in the Library. Special reading and work rooms 
include: 

GuMMERE-MoRLEY RooM, a browsing room commemorating Pro- 
fessors F. B. Gummere and Frank Morley, Sr. 

Microforms Room, equipped with microfilm, microfiche, and micro- 
card readers, and a microfilm file of The New York Times. 

RuFus M, Jones Study, a replica of Rufus Jones's study, with some 
of his books and furniture. 

The Treasure Room, provided through the generosity of Morris E. 
Leeds, Class of 1888, contains part of the Quaker Collection. Staff 
offices and research facilities for visiting scholars are provided in the 
Treasure Room, Borton Wing, and Harvey Room. 

The Borton Room, named for Hugh Borton, Class of 1926, former 
President of Haverford College, adjoins the Treasure Room. Above the 
Borton Room is the Harvey Peace Research Room; below it, the vault 
for rare books and manuscripts. 

The Christopher Morley Alcove, at the east end of the building, 
serves as a browsing area and contains exhibits and collections of 
Christopher Morley 's writings. 

The Sharpless Room, named in honor of Isaac Sharpless, president 
of Haverford 1887-1917, and furnished by the Class of 1917, is a public 
gallery where many of the College's paintings are hung. 

The Hires Room, named for Harrison Hires, Class of 1910, and 
Mrs. Hires, is an audio room where discs and tapes can be heard. 

The Strawbridge Seminar Room is used for seminars and com- 
mittee meetings. 

The C. C. Morris Cricket Room and Collection is a handsome 
lounge with shelves and display cases illustrating the history of American 
cricket, with special emphasis on Haverford College and the Philadelphia 
area. 

33 



The Crawford Mezzanine in the South Wing provides writing and 
study tables for forty-four students. It is named for Alfred R. Crawford, 
Class of 1931, Vice President of the College, 1964-66. 

The original north wing was renovated in 1952 and called the Philips 
Wing in honor of one of the College's principal benefactors, William 
Pyle Philips, Class of 1902. 

Departmental libraries are maintained in Stokes Hall for Chemistry, 
Physics, and Mathematics; in Drinker Hall, for Music; in Hilles Hall, for 
Engineering; and in Sharpless Hall, for Biology and Psychology. 

Special Collections 

The Quaker Collection was started in 1867 when the Board of 
Managers decided to gather "an important reference library, especially 
for works and manuscripts relating to our own Religious Society." 
The Library already contained many Quaker books and manuscripts, 
including the "Letters and Papers of William Penn," a gift of Henry 
Pemberton. 

Today the Quaker Collection is a major repository for both printed 
and manuscript material about the Society of Friends. The 22,000 books 
include more than 4000 printed before 1700, the unique nucleus of 
which is the William H. Jenks Collection of Friends Tracts, containing 
1600 separately bound titles, mostly of the seventeenth century. The 
several thousand pamphlets and serials in the collection include the most 
complete sets of the bound volumes of Quaker periodicals and of Yearly 
Meeting minutes in existence. The 75,000 manuscripts and documents, 
maps and pictures, include the journals of nearly 700 important Friends, 
the papers of many Quaker families, Meeting records, archives of Quaker 
organizations, and a great deal of material on Friends and the Indians. 

The Quaker Collection welcomes gifts of family papers, books, or 
other material related to the history of Friends, and it grows constantly 
through both gifts and purchases. A brochure describing the Quaker 
Collection may be obtained upon request. 

The Rufus M. Jones Collection on Mysticism contains 1360 
books and pamphlets from the fifteenth century to the present day. 

The Tobias Collection of the Writings of Rufus M. Jones 
is practically complete. It consists of 325 separate volumes and 16 boxes 
of pamphlets and extracts. The personal papers of Rufus M. Jones 
are also in the Library, and are available for use by scholars under 
certain conditions. 

The Charles Roberts Autograph Collection contains more than 
20,000 items, embracing autographed letters of the signers of the Decla- 

34 



ration of Independence, authors, statesmen, educators, artists, scientists, 
ecclesiastics, and monarchs, and also several series of valuable papers 
on religious, political, and military history. 

French Drama of the Romantic Period, a collection of several 
hundred popular plays produced in Paris between 1790 and 1850, The 
collection was presented to the College by William Maul Measey. 

The Christopher Morley Collection of Autographed Letters 
comprises about 200 letters and memoranda selected by Mr. Morley 
from his correspondence files. Over one hundred contemporary authors 
are represented. 

The William Pyle Philips Collection contains rare books and 
manuscripts, mostly of the Renaissance period. Among the treasures of 
this collection are first editions of Dante, Copernicus, Spenser, the King 
James Bible, Milton, Newton, and the four folios of Shakespeare. 

The Harris Collection of Ancient and Oriental Manuscripts 
contains over 60 Hebrew, Latin, Arabic, Syriac, and Ethiopian rolls and 
Codices collected by J. Rendel Harris. 

Affiliations 

Haverford maintains a cooperative arrangement with Bryn Mawr and 
Swarthmore whereby the facilities of the libraries of all three colleges 
are open to faculty and students of each of the colleges. 

The Philadelphia Bibliographical Center and Union Library 
Catalogue, the largest regional cooperative catalogue in America, 
enables users of the Haverford Library to locate books in over 200 
libraries of the Philadelphia area. 

ART COLLECTION 

A small permanent art collection, including paintings and drawings 
by Homer, Inness, Pinturricchio, Sargent, and Whistler, is displayed 
in the Library. Temporary exhibitions of paintings, drawings, and 
photographs are held from time to time at the College. 

Framed reproductions of outstanding paintings and a few originals 
are available at the beginning of each semester for loan to students. 

MUSIC 

In addition to a considerable collection of music scores, including the 
complete works of several composers, the special equipment of the Music 
Department consists of several pianos and a collection of scores, books, 
and phonograph records presented in 1933 by the Carnegie Corporation. 

35 



This record collection, housed in the Henry S. Drinker Music Center, 
has served as the basis for further acquisitions which are used for teach- 
ing and study purposes. 

RESIDENCE HALLS 

Approximately 95% of the students live on campus. With few ex- 
ceptions, most men live in suites where two, three, or four bedrooms 
adjoin a common living room. 

The dormitories include Barclay Hall and Lloyd Hall, which house 
mostly freshmen, Leeds Hall and Gummere Hall. Three new dormitories, 
Jones, Lunt, and Comfort Halls were opened in 1968. Each houses 64 
men. Two of them include a suite where students may host visiting 
scholars. 

Spanish- and French-speaking students may reside in Williams House 
and French House. 

ATHLETIC FACILITIES 

Haverford's Gymnasium is supplemented by the Alumni Field 
House, which affords capacious facilities for indoor athletics and has 
proved its value in the College's extensive program for physical educa- 
tion. Walton Field, where football games and track meets are held, has 
stands capable of seating 2000 spectators. Around the field is a quarter- 
mile track with a 220-yard straight-away. In addition, varsity soccer 
matches are played on the Class of '88 Field, varsity baseball games are 
played on Class of '16 Field, and cricket is played on Cope Field. The 
College has 15 tennis courts, six of them all-weather, a skating pond, 
a cross-country course, and several practice fields which are also used 
for intramural sports. 

OTHER BUILDINGS 

The admissions office and office of the President are located in 
Roberts Hall, an impressive columned building at the center of the 
campus, which also contains an auditorium seating over 700. Other 
administration offices are maintained in Founders, Hilles and 
Whitall. The Union provides facilities for the campus radio station, 
student lounges, the College bookstore, and a snack bar. 

Morris Infirmary, presented by John T. Morris of the Class of 1867, 
houses a clinic, emergency treatment room, and facilities for bed care 
of 10 patients, including an isolation ward for contagious diseases. It 
has its own kitchen and accommodations for a resident nurse. 

LOCATION 

Located 10 miles west of Philadelphia on the "Main Line," Haver- 
ford is fortunate to have the extensive cultural, scientific and industrial 

36 



facilities of the Greater Philadelphia area close at hand. Within a half 
hour's drive there are some 20 other colleges and universities. Haver- 
ford Station, on the Pennsylvania Railroad between Ardmore and 
Bryn Mawr, is 20 minutes from the center of the city. The campus 
fronts on famous Lancaster Pike (U.S. 30), a few miles from the Penn- 
sylvania Turnpike. It is approximately two hours by train from New 
York or Baltimore and less than three hours from Washington. 

The campus, landscaped and park-like in appearance, provides a 
beautiful natural setting. The Arboretum and Woolman Walk, the 
latter the gift of the late Edward Woolman '93, contain a wide variety 
of woody plants, both indigenous and exotic, thus permitting direct 
observation and study by students of the natural sciences. 

ADMISSION 

The policy of Haverford College is to admit to the freshman class 
those applicants who, in the opinion of the Committee on Admissions, 
are best qualified to profit by the opportunities which the College offers 
and at the same time to contribute to undergraduate life. Due regard 
is given not only to scholarly attainment, as shown by school record 
and examination, but also to character, personality, and interest and 
ability in important extracurricular activities. 

Whenever practicable, the College will expect the candidate to have 
a personal interview with the Director of Admissions or another admin- 
istrative officer. Every applicant should realize that, in view of the 
limited enrollment, he is entering a competition for admission to a 
carefully selected and comparatively small student organization. On 
the basis of all information available — school record, class standing. 
College Board reports, evidence touching on character and personality 
— the application will be accepted or rejected, and the decision of the 
Committee on Admissions is final. Preference will be given to those 
with superior records and credentials rather than to those with mere 
priority of application. 

The preparatory course should include as a minimum four years of 
EngUsh, three years of mathematics including two years of algebra, three 
years of one foreign language (in preference to two years of two lan- 
guages), a laboratory science, and a course in history or social studies. 
Additional courses in foreign language, mathematics, science, social 
studies and history will be dictated by the interests of the candidates. 

Each applicant for admission must take the Scholastic Aptitude Test 
and three Achievement Tests of the College Entrance Examination 
Board. The English Composition Test is required, but a candidate may 

37 



choose the other two tests. If there is any doubt about the choice of the 
two tests, he should consult the Director of Admissions. Applications 
involving divergence from the normal procedure must be discussed in 
detail with the Director of Admissions. 

Applications for admission should be submitted early in the candi- 
date's senior year. The application must be accompanied by a check 
or money order for $10 drawn to the order of Haverford College to 
cover the application fee, which is not refundable. 

Candidates are encouraged to visit the College for an interview. The 
Office of Admissions is open from 9 a.m. until 4:30 p.m. on weekdays 
and from 9 a.m. until noon on Saturdays. The office is closed on Satur- 
days during the summer. Arrangements should be made in advance 
for an appointment. 

Alumni Representatives in various sections are pleased to provide 
information about the College to interested students. A list of Alumni 
Representatives is on page 179-186 of this catalogue. 

INFORMATION CONCERNING COLLEGE ENTRANCE BOARD TESTS 

The College Entrance Examination Board will offer the Scholastic 
Aptitude Test and Achievement Tests on each of the following dates 
during the 1968-69 academic year: 

Sat., Nov. 2, 1968 Sat., Mar. 1, 1969 

Sat., Dec. 7, 1968 Sat, May 3, 1969 

Sat., Jan. 11, 1969 Sat., July 12, 1969 

The Bulletin of Information, distributed without charge by the Col- 
lege Entrance Examination Board to all secondary schools that present 
candidates for the tests, contains rules regarding applications, fees, 
reports, and the conduct of the tests; lists of examination centers; and 
an application. This application may be used for any College Board 
administration involving the SAT and Achievement Tests. Additional 
applications will be available at the schools for students needing more 
than one. Booklets describing the tests and giving sample questions, 
explanations, and answers, as well as score interpretation booklets for 
counselors and students, are also distributed in quantity to secondary 
schools without charge. 

Candidates should make application by mail to the College Entrance 
Examination Board, Box 592, Princeton, N. J. 08540. Students who 
wish to take the examinations in any of the following States, territories, 
or foreign areas should address their inquiries and send their applica- 

38 



tions to College Entrance Examination Board, P. O. Box 1025, Berke- 
ley, Calif. 94701. 

Alaska 

Arizona 

California 

Colorado 

Hawaii 

Idaho 

Montana 



Nevada 

New Mexico 

Oregon 

Utah 

Washington 

Wyoming 

Alberta 

British Columbia 



Manitoba 
Saskatchewan 
Northwest Territory 
Yukon Territory 
Republic of Mexico 
Australia 

Pacific Islands, including 
Japan and Formosa 



EARLY DECISION 

An early decision plan is available for candidates whose first choice is 
Haverford. Since a limited number of students can be accepted under 
the plan, only students who have seriously investigated the College and 
who are well qualified should apply. Candidates must take the required 
College Board examinations in their junior year and must submit an 
application before November 1 . Additional information may be obtained 
from the Director of Admissions. 

TRANSFER STUDENTS 

A number of transfer students are admitted each year. In addition to 
filling an application, a candidate must submit a school transcript (on 
a form provided by Haverford), the results of the College Board exami- 
nations that he has taken, a college transcript, a letter of recommenda- 
tion from a responsible official of the college which he is attending, 
and have an interview with a representative of the Admissions Office. 
Decisions are usually announced in June. 

ADVANCED STANDING 

An adequately qualified student may be permitted to omit an intro- 
ductory course in college and proceed directly to work at the intermedi- 
ate level in that subject. Several departments give placement examina- 
tions to determine these qualifications; other departments use less formal 
means. Students who have taken courses in high school under the Ad- 
vanced Placement Program may take tests in these subjects given by 
the College Entrance Examination Board each May. Students who do 
well on these tests may be given advanced placement or college credit 
or both. Credit may also be granted for work done at another college 
prior to entrance here. To be considered for such credit, a student must 
arrange for the transcript of the work to be sent to Haverford. Provision 

39 



(§ 



is made under the Flexibility Program (see pages 50-52) for a student 
to make a special use of such credits if he so desires. 



HOUSING 

The value of participating as widely as possible in the life of the 
community is an integral part of Haverford's educational philosophy. 
Therefore students, with the exception of those who are married or 
are living at home, are normally expected to live on campus. 

Entering freshmen are assigned the rooms available after the other 
classes have made their choice. New students will be notified of their 
housing assignments prior to their arrival on campus in September. 

A deposit of $35 is required of all new students at the time they 
are notified of their admission. A similar deposit is required also of 
those students who have not been in attendance at the College during 
the immediately preceding semester. This amount will be deducted 
from the bill for the following year. If the student fails to present him- 
self at the beginning of the semester for which he has been enrolled, 
the deposit will be forfeited. 

Students are expected to treat College property with the same con- 
sideration as their own. A student is held financially responsible for 
any damage to his room. 



EXPENSES 

The tuition charge for all regular students is $2125 for the academic 
year.* Tuition for special students is $250 per course, per semester. 
The residence fee is $950 per year. The payment of a unit fee of $150 
per year makes it possible for the student to participate in any campus 
organization without an additional fee. 

The residence fee covers board and room charges when College is in 
session; under the latter are included heat, electric light, weekly service, 
and the use of necessary bedroom furniture, i.e., a bureau, table, chair, 
study lamp, and a bed, the linen for which is furnished and laundered 
by the College. Students will supply their own study furniture, blankets, 
and towels. Full furnishings are provided in Jones, Lunt, and Comfort 
Halls. 

The unit fee includes the following: student activities fee, admission 



* Any student who is taking four or more courses in a given semester, or who 
has been granted permission, under the Flexibility Program (see pages 50-52) to 
carry fewer courses, is regarded as a regular student. 

40 



to Art Series, laboratory fees, health fee, accident insurance (a maxi- 
mum of $1000 within one year of each accident), diploma, and psycho- 
logical tests when required by the College. 

There are four scheduled vacation recesses during the school year: 
Thanksgiving, Christmas, midyear recess, and spring vacations. With 
minor exceptions student services and facilities and academic facilities 
are closed or drastically curtailed during vacation periods. An extra room 
charge of $2 per day is made for students remaining on campus during 
the Christmas and spring vacations. 

The College requires that bills rendered August 15 and January 15 
for the following semester's tuition, board, room, unit fee, and deposits 
be paid in full before the beginning of the semester. In order to avoid 
last minute congestion, it is suggested that bills be paid by mail in 
advance. If the tuition bill is not paid, the student will not be considered 
as enrolled at the College. Transcripts will not be released at the end of 
the semester until all charges and fees have been paid. 

A non-refundable fee of $10 is payable when application for admis- 
sion is presented. 

When a special diet is required for medical reasons, and approved 
by the college physician, a charge of $1.50 weekly will be made, but 
this charge may be increased if the special foods required are unusually 
expensive. 

The College requires freshmen to pay a fee of $25 toward the cost 
of the orientation week. New students who are not freshmen should 
come on Thursday afternoon of orientation week. A fee of $10 will 
be charged for this portion of the orientation period. 

The College requires a $100 deposit to cover the cost of books and 
any other incidental charges which may arise during the school year. 
Each incidentals account must have a balance, on June 1, adequate 
to cover all final charges. At intervals during the year, a bill for the 
actual charges made will be sent to the student. If this bill, or any other 
indebtedness, is not paid by the end of the semester, credits will not be 
granted for the work performed. Any unspent balance is refunded at the 
end of the academic year. A student's official transcript will not normally 
be sent until all outstanding charges [fees, books and other incidental 
charges] have been paid. 

No reduction or refund of the tuition charge will be made after 
the first two weeks of any semester. If a student withdraws before 
the completion of the first two weeks, there will be a complete refund 
of his tuition. In case of withdrawal or absence due to Ulness, full refund 



41 



of the residence fee cannot be made, since overhead expenses continue. 
However, if a student withdraws more than four weeks before the end 
of a semester, or is absent because of illness for four weeks or more, a 
partial refund of the residence fee, in the amount of $10 for each week 
of absence, will be made. The unit fee cannot be refunded for any 
reason. 

COLLEGE RESPONSIBILITY 

The College is not responsible for loss due to fire, theft, or any other 
cause. Students who wish to take out fire insurance may apply for infor- 
mation at the Business Office. 

MONTHLY PAYMENTS 

Parents who prefer to pay tuition and other fees in monthly instal- 
ments may do so through the Bryn Mawr Trust Company. Details of 
this plan, including charges for financing, may be obtained from the 
Business Office. 

FINANCIAL AID 

Students at Haverford pay only a portion of the entire cost of their 
education, since endowment income covers 50 percent of it. Neverthe- 
less it must be recognized that the student bill is a considerable sum. 
Fortunately, the College has many resources to aid in meeting expenses. 
As a result, no able and responsible student who is seriously interested 
in Haverford should hesitate to apply because of financial reasons. 

The main sources of financial aid are described below. A more de- 
tailed discussion of the problem is described in a separate booklet en- 
titled Financial Aid at Haverford. 

The financial aid program — scholarships, loans, and jobs — is ad- 
ministered by a committee consisting of the Director of Admissions, who 
serves as chairman, the Associate Dean of the College, and the Dean 
of Students. 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

Scholarships are awarded on a basis of merit and individual need. 
While no scholarship is given for more than one year, it is the practice 
to continue the scholarship if a student's scholastic performance has 
been satisfactory and his need continues. 

No scholarship will be given to a student whose academic standing 
is unsatisfactory. 

No scholarship will be given to a student whose previous college bill 
has not been paid in full. 

Candidates for freshman scholarships must file a financial statement 
with the College Scholarship Service, at the appropriate CSS office, 

42 



before January 15th. Copies of the form to be used may be obtained 
from the applicant's high school or from the College Scholarship 
Service. 

Inquiries about scholarships for incoming students should be ad- 
dressed to the Director of Admissions. 

Students enrolled at the College must submit all preliminary cor- 
respondence and applications for undergraduate scholarships for 1969- 
70, together with supporting letters from parents or guardians, to the 
Director of Admissions, before April 15, 1969. 

It is assumed that requests for scholarships will not be made by those 
whose expenses can be met by their parents or from other sources. 

Corporation Awards — Four Corporation Scholars will be chosen 
in the senior, junior and sophomore classes. The selection will be made 
on the basis of the highest general averages for the preceding year. Each 
Corporation Scholar will be awarded $50. No application for these 
awards is necessary. 

Endovv^ed Scholarships — Included in the College's endowment are 
a number of funds designated especially for scholarships. A list of the 
endowed scholarships appears on pages 162-169 of this catalog. 

General Scholarships — In addition to the endowed scholarships, 
a general scholarship fund is available. Scholarships awarded from this 
fund will vary in size and number according to the needs of the appli- 
cants. 

STUDENT LOAN FUNDS 

Loan funds are available for students in good standing who demon- 
strate financial need. 

Haverford College does not participate in the NDEA Loan Program, 
but has established a College Loan Fund which is similar in most im- 
portant respects. Any member of the student body who qualifies may 
borrow up to $ 1 000 a year under this plan. 

Short-term loans are available for emergencies. They are limited to 
$300 a year, carry no interest charge, and are repayable within the 
academic year. 

Inquiries about loans should be addressed to the Director of Admis- 
sions. 

STUDENT AID 

In addition to the Student Loan Fund and to scholarship help, the 
College offers students the opportunity to work at standard rates in the 
Library and as clerical assistants to faculty and administrative officers 
of the College. The program of student aid is administered by the Dean 
of Students. 

43 



PLACEMENT SERVICE 

Haverford's placement service is under the direction of the Director 
of Alumni Affairs. A list of positions open in business, government and 
institutions is maintained in the Alumni Office. Interviews with repre- 
sentatives of business concerns, government agencies and institutions 
can be arranged. Students planning to go to graduate schools are guided 
by members of the administration and faculty appointed to provide 
advice and information in these areas: business administration, educa- 
tion, engineering, law, medicine and theology. Students planning to do 
graduate work in a departmental subject should consult with the chair- 
man of the department at Haverford. 

CURRICULUM 

Haverford is a liberal arts college. Its curriculum is designed to 
develop in its students the capacity to learn and to understand, to make 
sound and thoughtful judgments. The requirements for the degree 
encourage the exercise of these skills in each of the broad fields of 
human knowledge, and a fuller development of them in a single field 
of concentration. 

BACHELOR'S DEGREE 

To graduate from Haverford College a student must complete success- 
fully the equivalent of four years of academic work, at least 36 semester 
courses, and eight terms of non-academic work in physical education or 
the Arts and Service Program. Credit for a year of academic work is 
given to a student who has passed at least eight semester courses with 
an average of at least 60 for the freshman year, 65 for the sophomore 
year, and 70 for the junior and senior years. The Academic Flexibility 
Program described below suggests some ways in which the program may 
be adapted to meet the needs of individual students. 

Among the 36 courses taken for the degree, a student must include 
English 11-12 or its equivalent, the courses required by his major 
department, and those required under the distribution requirement. To 
avoid undue specialization, the College requires that at least 21 courses 
must be passed in departments other than the student's major. A course 
in the major field cannot be used to satisfy a departmental requirement 
for the degree if the grade is below 65. He must also include course 
100 in his major department during the senior year, at the end of which 
he must take the comprehensive examination in that department and 
receive in it a grade of at least 70. The degree conferred upon candidates 
meeting these requirements is that of Bachelor of Arts, or, for students 
majoring in the natural sciences, mathematics or engineering who request 
it, Bachelor of Science. 

44 



Course Load 
Of the 36 courses required for graduation, 20 are normally completed 
by the end of the sophomore year. However, on recommendation of 
the faculty adviser and with the approval of the Associate Dean, a 
student may take as few as 1 8 courses during the first two years. Within 
these limits, the 36 courses may be distributed among the normal eight 
semesters as the student and his adviser see fit — five courses in each 
of four semesters (usually the first four) and four courses in each of the 
remaining semesters. Any student is free to take more than 36 courses, 
but to take more than five at one time he must have had an average 
of 80 or better the preceding semester. 

Course Intensification 
The College believes that experience in a wide diversity of courses 
is an essential part of a Haverford education, but the College also 
recognizes that students may sometimes profit from the opportunity to 
work more intensively in a smaller number of subjects. Therefore, with 
the approval of his adviser, a student may register, with the instructor's 
permission, for double credit in one course and, in unusual cases, in 
more than one. In a double-credit course, the student undertakes an 
approved program of independent study in conjunction with a regular 
course and submits a paper or passes an examination based on his 
independent work. Such independent work is not suitable in all subjects, 
and the instructor of the course must be the final judge of whether or 
not it should be attempted. In unusual cases a student may apply to the 
Committee on Academic Flexibility for permission to pursue a reduced 
program without enrolling in a double-credit course. 

Distribution Requirement 

By the end of his sophomore year a student must have passed English 
11-12 or its equivalent, and in addition at least two semester courses 
in each of the three divisions of the College. For the purposes of this 
requirement courses cross-listed between departments in two divisions 
will count only in the division in which they are actually taught. General 
courses meet distribution requirements in the division in which they are 
actually taught. Elementary and intermediate language courses may not 
be counted toward distribution requirements. 

The departments of the College [including Bryn Mawr departments 
of Archaeology, Geology, History of Art and Italian, for which Haver- 
ford has no counterparts] are divided into three divisions as follows: 

Humanities: Archaeology, Classics, Enghsh, French, German, History 
of Art, Italian, Music, Philosophy, Religion, Russian and 
Spanish. 

45 



Natural Sciences: Astronomy, Biology, Chemistry, Engineering, Geol- 
ogy, Mathematics and Physics. 
Social Sciences: Economics, History, Political Science, Psychology, 

Sociology and Anthropology. 
Courses taken at Bryn Mawr will be accepted as satisfying distribu- 
tion requirements, but not normally courses taken elsewhere. For transfer 
students, credit toward distribution requirements for work already done 
is evaluated by the Associate Dean at the time of admission. 

Foreign Languages 

In order to graduate, a student whose native language is English, must 
complete one year of a foreign language beyond the elementary level. 
This requirement may be met by a qualifying examination. 

At the time a student is admitted to a department his major super- 
visor, in consultation with the student and his language instructors, will 
decide whether the student's projected upper class work and special 
interests require him to pursue additional language study, and if so, 
what study is required. 

Free Electives 
A number of courses sufficient to bring the total to at least 36 semes- 
ter courses shall be chosen by the student in consultation with his faculty 
adviser, with the understanding that the College reserves the right, 
through the adviser and the Associate Dean, to prevent unreasonable 
combinations of courses. 

N on- Academic Electives 
In addition to the thirty-six semester courses of academic work re- 
quired for a degree, eight terms of non-academic courses are required 
of each student, of which at least five terms must be in physical edu- 
cation, unless the student is excused on medical grounds. The non- 
academic program offers courses in three nine-week terms in the fall, 
winter and spring of the academic year. 

Major Concentration 

A student may elect to major in any one of the following depart- 
ments: Astronomy, Biology, Chemistry, Classical Archaeology (Bryn 
Mawr College), Classics, Economics, Engineering, English, French, 
Geology (Bryn Mawr College), German, History, History of Art (Bryn 
Mawr College), Italian (Bryn Mawr College), Mathematics, Music, 
Philosophy, Physics, Political Science, Psychology, Religion, Russian, 
Sociology and Anthropology (at Bryn Mawr College if emphasis is on 
Anthropology), Spanish. 

Definite requirements are stated under the name of each department 

46 



on pages 62-153. During the fourth semester of his attendance, each 
student should confer with the major supervisor of the department in 
which he wishes to major, and apply to him for written approval of a 
program of courses for the last four semesters. Such a program must 
provide for the completion, by the end of the senior year, of approxi- 
mately 12 semester courses, or the equivalent, at least six of which must 
be in the major department and the others in closely related fields. 
Should the student's application be rejected by all departments in which 
he is interested, he should consult the Associate Dean. Failure to file 
with the Associate Dean, before the date specified on the College calen- 
dar, a copy of his major program signed by his major supervisor, will 
entail a fine of $5. Any student who continues delinquent in this matter, 
unless he is excused by the Associate Dean, will be debarred from the 
final examinations in his fourth semester. Should the student's application 
be rejected by all the departments to which he applies, he will not be 
promoted. 

A student who applies for permission to become a major in any 
department may be rejected for scholastic reasons only. The College 
rule on this point is: 

If, at the time specified for application, the average of the grades 
obtained by a student in the "preliminary courses"* of any de- 
partment is 75 or above, the student will be accepted by that 
department. 

If the average of the grades obtained in these courses is below 
70, the student will be accepted in that department only under 
exceptional circumstances. 

If the average of the grades obtained in these courses is 70 or 
above, but below 75, the decision will be at the discretion of the 
major supervisor. 
A student who has been formally accepted as a major by any depart- 
ment has the right to remain as a major in that department as long as 
he is in college. Should he wish to change from one department to 
another after the beginning of his fifth semester, the change can be made 
only with the consent of the new major supervisor and the Associate 
Dean. 

Each senior must take a special major comprehensive examination 
(written, oral, or both) during the period scheduled for such examina- 



* "Preliminary courses" are any courses the student may already have taken in 
the department to which he is applying. If the applicant has not already taken 
any courses in that department, the department may name courses in other 
departments which are to be regarded as "preliminary." 

47 



tions. The purpose of this examination is to promote the student's 
comprehension, integration and application of the knowledge acquired 
in the field of his major concentration, and to secure evidence of this 
achievement. The passing grade for this examination is 70. In case of 
failure, a candidate may, with the permission of his major supervisor, 
present himself for re-examination at a date (to be determined by the 
major supervisor) later than Commencement Day of the current year. 

If the re-examination is taken one year later, during the regular period 
of major examinations, there is no fee. But if the candidate applies for 
re-examination at an earlier date (involving the preparation of a special 
examination for one individual), and if the request is granted, the fee 
is $25. 

As special background for the comprehensive examination, a senior 
shall engage in a period of study, technically called course 100, Senior 
Departmental Studies, in his department of concentration during the 
semester preceding that examination. This period of study shall be 
counted as one of the four courses normally carried by the student 
during his final semester. Evaluation of the work in course 100 may 
be included in the grade earned by the student in his comprehensive 
examination. 

In case of failure of the comprehensive examination, a student does 
not necessarily repeat the term work of course 100, but follows the 
application procedure for re-examination as indicated above. A student 
may not take more than two re-examinations in the field of his major 
concentration. 

Students taking majors under the supervision of Bryn Mawr College 
will note that their course 100 may extend over more than one semester; 
if this is the case, credit for two courses at Haverford will be granted 
if the work in each semester of this course is satisfactory. 

Examinations in courses in the major subject taken in the last 
semester of the senior year may be omitted at the discretion of the 
major supervisor. 

Courses taken in summer school will not satisfy Haverford course 
requirements for the major unless prior written approval is granted by 
the major supervisor. 

A student who has demonstrated unusual maturity and who has 
special interests and abilities may be permitted to arrange an inter- 
departmental major. The program of courses, the nature of the 100 
course, and the nature of the comprehensive examination for an inter- 
departmental major are to be worked out in advance (that is, when the 
major is selected) by the student, with permission of the Associate Dean, 
in consultation with and subject to the approval of the chairmen of the 

48 



departments concerned, one of whom will be designated as major 
supervisor for that student. 

In rare cases, and only for high-ranking students, a double major may 
be arranged, in which the student takes the complete major in each of 
two departments. In order to take a double major, a student must re- 
ceive permission from the Associate Dean as well as from the chairman 
of each of the departments concerned. 

FRESHMAN PROGRAM 

Each freshman, on entering the College, is assigned to a faculty 
member who serves as a special adviser for the orientation week and 
the first three weeks of the semester, and who makes himself available 
for extended consultations to facilitate adjustment to the College. During 
the third week of classes each freshman is reassigned to a regular 
adviser, where possible based on his preference among his teachers. 
Unless the student or the adviser requests a change, the student retains 
the same adviser until he chooses a major, near the end of the sopho- 
more year, when the chairman of the major department becomes his 
adviser. Assignment of advisers for incoming students is made by the 
Associate Dean, on the basis of the best evidence available to him. An 
important function of the adviser is to help the student select a plan of 
study, consistent with College requirements, which is suited to his 
special needs. 

The distribution requirements are designed to assure that each student 
will acquire a minimum breadth of knowledge and interest, and expose 
himself to areas of knowledge and ways of thinking which may be new 
to him, and which might change altogether his ideas about desirable 
areas of specialization. Since it is important that this diversified experi- 
ence be gained early, the faculty requires that students take English 
11-12 or its equivalent, and strongly recommends that the other four 
courses in each of the first two semesters be in four different depart- 
ments. Sophomores normally will not be permitted to take more than 
two courses in the same department in any one semester. The Committee 
on Academic Flexibility will exercise general supervision over unusual 
combinations of courses. 

The courses open to freshmen are numbered 11 to 20 in the section 
on Courses of Instruction. If he is qualified, a freshman may be per- 
mitted by the department concerned and by the Associate Dean to take 
more advanced courses. 

A series of standard tests is administered to all entrants within the 
first few days of the first semester. These tests are helpful in guidance 
and counseling. 

Each freshman's capacity for oral expression is considered early in 

49 



the academic year, and further training in speech is given to those who 
need it, as well as to any others who may request it. 

FLEXIBILITY PROGRAM 

Since different students have different needs, abilities, and goals, there 
may be cases where the general regulations prevent a student from 
making the best use of educational opportunities at Haverford. Provision 
is therefore made for changing the normal requirements in certain 
individual cases. Particular emphasis is placed on attempting to take 
advantage of any advanced work, such as that done under the Advanced 
Placement Program, which a student may have completed successfully 
before entering the College. 

Power to act on requests for exceptions to any of the academic regu- 
lations is in the hands of a standing committee of the faculty, called 
the Committee on Academic Flexibility, which consists of three faculty 
members and the Associate Dean of the College. Before granting an 
exception, the committee will secure approval from the student's major 
supervisor or, if the student is an underclassman, from his adviser and 
from the chairman of the department in which he proposes to major. 
Any student who believes that a special course program would promote 
his best intellectual development, is invited to present a proposal to this 
group. Students with exceptional abilities or exceptional preparation or 
both (including especially those students who enter with several credits 
from the Advanced Placement Program) are encouraged to consider 
whether a program out of the ordinary may help them to make the 
most of their opportunities. The College suggests consideration of the 
following, as examples of special programs which might be followed: 

Enrichment and Independent Study: Students with outstanding records 
who have the approval of the appropriate departmental chairmen and 
the Committee on Academic Flexibility may depart from the usual course 
patterns. Three examples follow: 

(a) A student admitted to the Thesis Program may enroll in his 
senior year in as few as three courses, and will complete a thesis 
based on independent work. 

(b) A student admitted to an Interdepartmental Program must first 
have been accepted as an interdepartmental major (the two 
departments need not be in the same division). His program, 
which may include a reduced course load and a thesis, as in (a) 
above, will also include some advanced independent work relating 
to both departments. 

(c) A student admitted to a Concentrated Program will be permitted 
more than the usual amount of concentration, taking in each of 

50 



two or three of his last four semesters, two double-credit courses 
in his major field, or a closely related field. 

Students who meet the standards set by departments for honors, may 
be granted departmental or interdepartmental honors for these programs. 

Graduation in less than eight Haverjord semesters: Students with 
extra credits, gained from the Advanced Placement Program, summer 
school, or carrying an overload, or from some combination of these, 
may be able to finish requirements for the Haverford degree in less than 
the normal four years. Other students may obtain credit for a year's 
work under either the Study Abroad or the Junior Year Language pro- 
grams. Such students, like transfer students, may graduate after fewer 
than eight semesters at Haverford, but with the usual 36 course credits. 

Sufl&ciently mature students, if they possess outstanding ability or are 
judged to have legitimate reason for special consideration, may be al- 
lowed to graduate without necessarily accumulating all of the credits 
normally required. The Committee on Academic Flexibility may approve 
an individual student course program for graduation with fewer than 
the usual number of courses. Three examples of possible programs are: 

(a) Graduation after three years: A student who has done consistently 
good work and who, by the beginning of his second year at 
Haverford, has credit for 15 or more courses, may request per- 
mission to graduate after only two more years at the College. 
If such permission is granted, it will be with the proviso that he 
must maintain a very high level of performance and, to help 
assure sufficient breadth in his program, he must not only meet 
the usual distribution and minimum departmental require- 
ments, but must study for four consecutive semesters some 
subject (or meaningful combination of subjects) outside of the 
division in which his major department lies. His continuation 
in this program is subject to review, before he enters his senior 
year, by the Committee and by his major supervisor. 

{h) A term away from Haverford: There may be occasion when a 
student's needs are best served by studying or serving elsewhere 
for a time, without gaining formal academic credit, as he would 
if he were in a program like Study Abroad. A student accepted 
into the "term away" program must meet all departmental and 
distribution requirements, and must successfully complete a 
total of seven semesters at Haverford and at least one semester 
elsewhere (or six at Haverford, and two or more elsewhere) en- 
gaged in a program (academic, service to others, gainful employ- 
ment, etc. ) approved in advance by the Committee on Academic 

51 



Flexibility and by his major supervisor, and evaluated by them 
after completion. 

(c) Reduced course load: The 36 course requirement in effect at 
Haverford helps to assure that diversity which is an important 
part of a liberal education. There may, however, be students 
who could profit by carrying fewer than the normal number of 
courses each semester. The Committee on Academic Flexibility 
is authorized to permit some students, where good reason can 
be shown, to omit one of their courses. 

Graduation in more than eight Haverford semesters: Although most 
students are expected to graduate in four academic years, some, as 
indicated above, may take less and some may be permitted to take more. 
The Committee on Academic Flexibility may permit some students to 
remain at Haverford for a fifth year. Examples would include students 
with physical handicaps which prevented them from carrying a full load, 
students who change their goals or who have aspirations (such as a 
double major) for which more than four years might be required, and 
students who wish to take, simultaneously with their work at Haverford, 
part-time work elsewhere (such as journalism, design, etc.) for which 
academic credit at Haverford is not appropriate. 

DEVELOPMENTAL READING 

A program of developmental reading, under the supervision of the 
counselors, offers an opportunity for students to improve their reading 
and study proficiency. Few students, if any, have realized their real 
potentiality in this field. Through a series of conferences, and some 
group sessions, methods of developing higher level reading skills are 
explored and practiced. Any student who is willing to concentrate upon 
it, while reading for his various subjects, will find that he can increase 
his speed and comprehension. Also, by giving thought to the different 
purposes of reading, and practicing methods appropriate to each purpose, 
he may increase his adaptability, making each type of reading more 
effective. 

PREPARATION FOR PROFESSIONS 

A large number of Haverford College students plan, after graduation, 
to enter upon further courses of study. As a liberal arts college, Haver- 
ford arranges its curriculum so that students who have such plans are 
able to meet the entrance requirements of graduate and professional 
schools. The College does not, however, attempt to anticipate in its own 
curriculum the work of any graduate or professional school. It is the 
conviction of the faculty that the best preparation for graduate work is 

52 



a liberal education, with sound training in basic disciplines, to which 
more specialized training may later be added. 

A student who intends to go to a professional school is free to choose 
his major in accord with his principal abilities and interests, since pro- 
fessional schools, such as those of business administration, education, 
law, medicine, or theology, usually accept students on the basis of merit 
regardless of their choice of major and, except in the case of medical 
schools, without specific course requirements. The requirements of most 
state boards of medical licensure are such that all students who hope 
to be admitted to a medical school must take two semester courses, 
each of which must include laboratory work, in biology (usually Biology 
12 and Biology 21), Chemistry 13, 14 (or 15, 16), 25, 26, and 
Physics 13, 14. 

Students who plan to go to professional schools should seek advice 
as early as possible from appropriate faculty members as follows: busi- 
ness administration, Mr. Teaf; education, Mr. Lyons; engineering, Mr. 
Hetzel; international affairs, Mr. Mortimer; law, Mr. Lane; medicine, 
Mr. Cadbury or Mr. Santer; theology, Mr. Spiegler. 

If a student plans to do graduate work in a departmental subject, 
such as economics, mathematics, history, etc., he should consult as early 
as possible with the chairman of the department at Haverford which 
most nearly corresponds to the department in which he plans to work 
in graduate school. This adviser will be able to guide him in his selection 
of courses, his choice of major (which will not necessarily be in the 
department of his intended graduate study), and other questions which 
may have bearing on his future. 

Law schools, medical schools, and some graduate schools require 
applicants to take special admission tests. Arrangements for taking 
these tests are the responsibility of the student concerned; he can obtain 
information about them from the faculty members mentioned above. 

REGULATIONS 

Conflicting Courses 
A student is not allowed to elect conflicting courses, except with the 
permission of the Associate Dean and the two instructors concerned. 

Audited Courses 
A student who wishes to audit a course should obtain the permission 
of the instructor. No charge is made for auditing, and audited courses 
are not listed on the transcript. 

Course Changes 
Courses may be changed during the first two weeks of each new 

53 



semester. During that time students are free to make changes after 
consultation with their advisers and the Associate Dean. 

Changes will not be permitted later except in cases where the student 
is known to be an excellent student and where he receives the consent 
of the professor to whose course he is changing and of his adviser and 
of the Associate Dean. 

A student, who has registered for a fifth course in a semester when 
he need take only four, may drop that course without penalty at any 
time before the end of the fourth week of classes with the approval of 
his adviser and the Associate Dean. 

Lecture and Laboratory Courses 

With the approval of the instructor in the course, the student's adviser, 
and the Associate Dean, a student may take for credit either the labora- 
tory work or the class work of a course which normally includes both. 
The grade received would be recorded on the student's transcript with 
the notation "Lecture only" or "Laboratory only," as the case might be. 
The grade received would not be included in the calculation of the 
student's average. 

Such a course would not be included among the 36 courses required 
for graduation, nor among the 21 courses required outside the student's 
major department, nor among the courses needed to meet a limited 
elective requirement. 

Evaluation of Academic Performance 

The instructor in each course submits at the end of each semester a 
numerical grade, or in some senior seminars, a written evaluation for 
each student. A grade of "c.i.p." (course in progress) may be sub- 
mitted at midyear for senior research courses which run throughout 
the year, and for certain other courses as agreed on by the instructor and 
the Associate Dean, and so announced at the beginning of the course. 

Passing grades at Haverford range from 60 to 100 inclusive. Failing 
grades range from 45 to 59 inclusive (the lowest grade given to a student 
who completes a course is 45). Beginning with the class of 1971, 
numerical grades given during a student's first four semesters will be 
used for internal College purposes only. The transcript record will 
indicate what courses a student has taken during his first two years, 
with a notation if he fails, drops or withdraws from any one of them. 

Should it be necessary to release any of these grades, exceptions will 
be administered by the Associate Dean. 

If a student drops a course, or is required by his instructor to drop 
it, the grade is recorded as "DR" and counts as a 40. If a student is 
permitted to withdraw from a course for unusual reasons including those 

54 



beyond the student's control, such as illness, it is recorded as "W" and 
is not assigned a numerical grade, nor regarded as a failure. 

The Committee on Academic Standing reviews students' records at 
intervals, and has authority to drop students from college, or to set 
requirements for additional work in cases of students whose work is 
unsatisfactory. As a rule, the committee will drop from college freshmen 
who do not receive the required minimum average of 60, sophomores 
whose averages are below 65, and juniors and seniors whose averages 
are below 70. However, any student whose record is such as to justify 
the belief that he is not availing himself of the opportunities offered by 
the College may be dropped. 

In a year course in which the work of the second semester depends 
heavily on that of the first, a student who fails the first semester but 
nevertheless is allowed to continue may receive credit for the first 
semester (although the grade will not be changed) if his grade for the 
second semester is 70 or above, provided that the instructor in the course 
states in writing to the Registrar at the beginning of the second semester 
that this arrangement applies. 

A student who, because of special circumstances such as illness, re- 
ceives a low grade in a course, may petition his instructor and the Asso- 
ciate Dean for a special examination. If the request is granted, and the 
student takes the special examination, the grade in that examination wiU 
replace the grade originally received in the midyear or final examination 
in computing the final grade for that course; the new course grade will be 
entered in place of the old on the student's transcript, and the semester 
average will be revised accordingly. 

Late Papers 
If a paper is assigned in place of the final examination in a course, 
the date by which it is due may be set by the instructor not later than 
4:00 P.M. on Wednesday, January 15th, for First Semester, or Tuesday, 
May 20th, for Second Semester. Laboratory notebooks must be turned 
in not later than these same dates. Late papers or notebooks will be 
given one-half of the grade they would have received, unless arrange- 
ments have been made in advance with the instructor in the course and 
the Associate Dean. If a paper represents the entire grade for a course, 
the maximum grade for such a late paper is 60, or, in a course required 
for the major, 65. 

Courses Taken Without Recorded Grade 
Juniors and seniors may elect one course each semester outside the 
division of their major department for which no grade will be recorded 
on the transcript. A notation will be made, however, if the student fails, 

55 



drops, or is permitted to withdraw from the course. Students must 
inform the Registrar of a course to be so handled by the end of the 
fourth week of classes. 

Courses With Written Evaluation 
In certain senior seminars, a department may choose to give a brief 
written evaluation of a student's performance instead of a numerical 
grade. These evaluations will be attached to the transcript record and 
will serve in place of numerical grades in those courses. Where such 
evaluation is to be used, this fact will be announced to the students at 
the time of registration. 

INTERCOLLEGIATE COOPERATION 

The variety of courses available to Haverford students is greatly 
increased as a result of a cooperative relationship among Haverford, 
Bryn Mawr College, Lincoln University, Swarthmore College, and the 
University of Pennsylvania. Under this arrangement, full-time students 
of any of these four institutions may, upon presentation of the proper 
credentials, enroll for courses at another institution of the group without 
added expense. 

Students wishing to take advantage of this arrangement must obtain 
the permission of the Associate Dean. Such permission is normally 
granted unless the course in question conflicts with required appoint- 
ments at Haverford. It is not granted if an equivalent course is offered at 
Haverford; however, if taking the course elsewhere will resolve a serious 
schedule conflict, the Associate Dean, with the consent of the department 
offering the equivalent course, is empowered to make an exception. 

Haverford students taking courses at Swarthmore College or the 
University of Pennsylvania are expected to make their own arrange- 
ments for transportation. Bryn Mawr and Haverford jointly operate two 
buses which make regular hourly trips between the two campuses on 
weekdays. 

STUDY ABROAD 

Well-qualified students who request it may be granted permission to 
spend a semester or a year studying in a foreign country. Such permis- 
sion will require approval of the student's major supervisor and the 
Associate Dean. If the student is not a language major, approval will 
also be required of the chairman of the department of the language 
spoken in the country selected. Interested students should consult the 
Associate Dean early in the sophomore year; he will direct them to 
faculty members best qualified to advise them. Students who may want to 
take their entire junior year abroad should plan their programs so that 
all limited elective requirements are completed by the end of the sopho- 

56 



more year. The program of studies abroad must be worked out in 
advance; if the program is completed successfully, the College will grant 
credit toward the degree for the work accomplished. Scholarship funds 
may be transferred for approved study abroad. 

JUNIOR YEAR LANGUAGE PROGRAM 

Provision is made, through a cooperative program with Princeton 
University, for the intensive study of certain languages not offered at 
Haverford — Arabic, Chinese, Japanese, Persian, and Turkish. A stu- 
dent participating in this program spends the summer after his sopho- 
more year in a program of intensive study of the language chosen, and 
then spends the junior year at Princeton University, continuing the 
study of the language and taking each semester two or three other 
courses in related regional studies. The remainder of his program will 
be electives, usually courses important for his major at Haverford. 

Students interested in this program should confer with the Associate 
Dean in the early spring of the sophomore year. To be nominated by the 
College, a student must have a good academic record, and must have 
secured the approval of his major supervisor. Selection from among 
the nominees is made by Princeton University. 

Students who wish to study the less common languages without taking 
time away from Haverford should consider the offerings in Italian at 
Bryn Mawr College and in Oriental, Scandinavian, and Slavic lan- 
guages at the University of Pennsylvania. Arrangements for taking such 
courses may be made in consultation with the Associate Dean. 

AFRICAN STUDIES 

Students wishing to focus their interests on African civilization are 
encouraged to enroll in courses emphasizing African materials offered 
by several departments in the humanities and social sciences at the 
three Quaker colleges and to arrange for regional concentration in ful- 
filling departmental requirements for majors. In planning their programs, 
students should consult Professor Harvey Glickman, Director of African 
Studies, or Professor Wyatt MacGaffey. 

VISITORS AND LECTURES 

Individual departments of the faculty invite visitors to Haverford for 
varying periods of time to meet with members of the department and 
with students interested in that field. These departmental visitors, who 
sometimes give public lectures, contribute considerably to the vitality of 
the work in the various departments. 

This program has been greatly strengthened as a result of a generous 
bequest from the late William P. Philips. A substantial sum from this 

57 



bequest is used to bring to Haverford "distinguished scientists and states- 
men," whose visits may last anywhere from a few hours to a full aca- 
demic year. 

SUMMER PROGRAMS 

Haverford does not have a regular summer session, but it does act 
as sponsor for a variety of non-academic, as well as educational, 
programs. 

The College offers a co-educational Summer Language Institute, with 
intensive instruction in German and French. This program is designed 
for students and teachers who wish to start a new language, and does 
not carry regular term credit at the College. 

Post-Baccalaureate Fellows (page 59) are eligible to participate in 
this program. Courses are also available for these Fellows in mathel 
matics, biology and English. | 

In 1967-68 the first Haverford Chamber Music Center was held at 
the College, with a string quartet, a concert pianist and American com- 
posers in residence. Repeated again in 1968-69, the program offers 
individual and group instruction in chamber music, its instruments and 
composition. Four Sunday evening public concerts add performing 
experience. 

In 1968-69, under a grant from the U. S. Office of Education, a 
summer institute in African Studies will offer a program of courses 
designed to introduce secondary school teachers to material on African 
history, politics, culture and international relations. 

Center for Nonviolent Resolution of Conflict 
Haverford College has long had a special concern for the peaceful 
resolution of conflict, particularly where it involves interracial and inter- 
national relations. Current urban unrest and increasing violence among 
nation-states call for new approaches to conciliation and problem-solving. 
Young men, faced with involvement in war and with racial injustice 
that conflicts with their basic values, have a special concern for seeking 
out constructive ways by which to influence the course of such conflicts 
away from war and domestic violence. 

This heightened concern has led the College to provide for the estab- 
lishment of a center for the study of conflict problems, and the direct 
involvement of members of its community in conflict resolution in vari- 
ous capacities. In the center program, students and faculty, through 
group study, formal courses, individual research projects, and the de- 
velopment of action programs, wifl increase their understanding of 
human conflict and will explore ways of strengthening and expanding 
available nonviolent means for resolving it. The program will be designed 



58 






to promote that healthy mixture of detachment and involvement that 
encourages both relevant scholarship and enlightened service. 

The center offers, as part of the social science curriculum, courses 
dealing with social conflict, nonviolence, and contemporary social and 
political issues. In addition, supervised individual research is available, 
as well as programs involving students in poverty programs in metro- 
politan Philadelphia and perhaps elsewhere in the nation and the world. 
It is hoped that in the next few years, interested students will be able to 
specialize in conflict studies within any one of the social science disci- 
phnes. Students interested in participating in the program should con- 
sult Paul Wehr, director of the center. 

POST-BACCALAUREATE FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM 

Under this program, established in 1966, feflowships are awarded to 
young men and women of promise who can profit by studying for a 
year at a highly demanding liberal arts college after receiving the 
bachelor's degree and before entering graduate or professional school. 
It is supported by substantial grants from the Rockefeller Foundation 
and the Josiah Macy, Jr. Foundation and smaller grants from several 
other sources. Most of the scholarships have been awarded to graduates 
of the predominantly Negro colleges of the South. 

The program centers at Haverford College, which handles the funds 
and supplies office space for the director, Wifliam E. Cadbury, Jr., who 
was dean of the College from 1951 until his resignation in January 
1966, to accept this position. 

For the academic year 1968-69, support is available for approximately 
30 students interested in earning a Ph.D. degree and foflowing careers 
of college or university teaching and research, for 20 students interested 
in medicine, and for one or two students interested in public affairs. 
Fellows for this year will study at Bryn Mawr, Haverford, Knox, 
Oberlin, Pomona and Swarthmore Colleges. They will choose their 
courses from the regular offerings, selecting those they feel will best 
fill their scholarly needs and interests. 

FINAL HONORS 

Final honors are awarded to students who have undertaken and 
carried through academic work of high quality. Final honors are of two 
kinds, those awarded by departments and those awarded by the College. 

1. A student who is considered to have the requisite ability is invited 
by his department to become an honors candidate as early as possible 
in the course of his major work. The exact nature of departmental 
honors work and the criteria used in judging it are hsted in the depart- 

59 



mental statements in this catalog. For honors the work in the department 
must be considerably superior to that required for graduation. The stu- 
dent must demonstrate his competence, insight and commitment to his 
field of interest. 

Individual departments may award honors to students whose depart- 
mental work has been of high quality and high honors to those who 
have demonstrated both high quality and originality, indicating an 
unusual degree of competence. 

2. Students who have been awarded department honors may be in- 
vited by the Committee on Honors and Fellowships to stand for 
College honors: magna cum laude or summa cum laude. Magna 
cum laude indicates that a student has understood to a superior degree 
the significant relations between the area of his own speciahzed com- 
petence and his College work as a whole. Summa cum laude indicates 
an even more outstanding achievement. Magna cum laude and summa 
cum laude are awarded by the faculty on recommendation of the 
Committee. 

The Committee on Honors and Fellowships will fix the minimum 
academic standards and procedures acceptable in any year for magna 
cum laude and summa cum laude and may require oral and /or written 
examinations or essays. 

HONOR SOCIETIES 

Phi Beta Kappa. — The Haverford College Chapter of the Phi Beta 
Kappa Society of America was chartered in 1898 as Zeta of Pennsyl- 
vania. Election of members-in-course, alumni members, and honorary 
members, based upon scholarly attainment and distinction, takes place 
at the end of the academic year. President, John F. Gummere '22; Vice 
President, George H. Nofer, II '49; Secretary, Holland Hunter '43; 
Treasurer, John Davison '51. 

Founders Club. — The Founders Club was established in 1914 as a 
Haverford organization of students, alumni, and faculty. Election to its 
membership is recognition of a sound academic record combined with 
noteworthy participation in extracurricular activities. Undergraduate elec- 
tions are usually limited to the junior and senior classes. President, 
E. Howard Bedrossian '42; Treasurer, Matthew M. Strickler '62. 



4 

I 

I 



60 



COURSES 



IIM 



IM 




The numbering system used in this Catalog involves a two-digit number for 
most semester courses. Courses numbered from 11 through 20, primarily fresh- 
man courses, are open to all students unless otherwise restricted; courses num- 
bered from 21 through 30 are open to sophomores, juniors and seniors; courses 
numbered from 31 through 60 are open to juniors and seniors; courses numbered 
from 61 through 80 are open only to seniors; courses numbered from 81 through 
89 are project courses open to seniors and, in exceptional circumstances, to 
juniors; in each department the course in preparation for the comprehensive 
examination is numbered 100. 

When two course numbers, followed by a single description, are joined by a 
hyphen, the course is a year course; a student who takes the first semester of such 
a course must normally take the second semester. When two course numbers 
followed by a single description are separated by a comma, the first semester may 
be taken without the second, though the two are normally taken together as a 
year course. In either case, the first semester course is prerequisite to the second. 
Credit will not automatically be given for the first semester of a year course in 
which the student fails the second semester. 

Unless further designated with an a (first semester) or a ft (second semester), 
courses with uneven numbers are given in the first semester; those with even 
numbers in the second. 

Where a course is listed as a prerequisite for another course, a grade of 65 or 
better will be required in the prerequisite course, unless otherwise specified; in 
exceptional circumstances, however, the instructor may waive this requirement at 
his discretion. 

The College does not assign a specific number of credit hours to each course. 
However, for agencies which require that records be submitted in terms of credit 
hours, the following rules apply: Each semester's work, if completed satisfac- 
torily with a full load of four or five courses, carries 15 semester hours credit. 
If a course is failed, credit is reduced by one-fourth or one-fifth, depending on 
whether the student is carrying four or five courses. Three hours is added for 
each course over five. Each laboratory course, when evaluated separately, is. 
counted as four semester hours. 

Credit will not automatically be given for the first semester of a year course in 
which the student fails the second semester. 



( 



i 



62 



ASTRONOMY ^ 

Professor LOUIS C.GKHBN,C.«.™,„"" jj 

The departmental work is designed to give students an understand- j** 
ing of and an interest in the universe in which they Uve. The relation D 
of astronomy to other fields of learning is kept to the fore. 2 

Q 

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS 3 

Astronomy 11, 12; three courses chosen from Astronomy 41, 42, 43, 45, 46; "% 
Astronomy 81 or 82, 100; Mathematics 13, 14 or 19; Physics 19. Three written 
comprehensive examinations of three hours each. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR HONORS 

All astronomy majors are regarded as candidates for honors. The award of 
honors will be made on the basis of superior work in the departmental courses, 
in certain related courses, and in the comprehensive examinations. 

11, 12 DESCRIPTIVE ASTRONOMY Mr. Green 

Our knowledge of the motions, composition, organization, and evolution of 
the solar system, stars and galaxies is presented, together with explanations of 
the methods by which this information is obtained. Prerequisite to Astronomy 
12 is Astronomy 1 1 or consent of the instructor. 
Offered in 1969-70 and thereafter. 

41 GENERAL RELATIVITY AND COSMOLOGY Mr. Green 
(Also called Physics 41} 

The tensor calculus is developed and applied to a discussion of general rela- 
tivity and cosmology. The observational and experimental evidence support- 
ing general relativity is reviewed, and the present state of the evidence 
favoring expanding and steady state universes is considered. Prerequisite: 
Physics 19, and Mathematics 13, 14 or 19. 

Offered in 1969-70 and alternate years. 

42 HIGH ENERGY ASTROPHYSICS Mr. Green 

This course will treat such topics as radio galaxies, quasi-stellar objects, 
galactic explosions, gravitational collapse, neutron starts, and cosmic X-ray 
and gamma-ray sources. Prerequisite: Physics 19, and Mathematics 13, 14 
or 19. 

Offered in 1969-70 and alternate years. 
****0« sabbatical leave in residence, 1968-69. 

63 



43 PLASMA PHYSICS Mr. Green 

The principles of magnetohydrodynamics and plasma physics are developed 
and applied to such topics as the earth's magnetism and paleomagnetism, the 
Van Allen belts; the origin and variations of the radio, ultraviolet, and 
cosmic ray fluxes; the distribution and alignment of the interstellar dust, the 
presence of synchrotron radiation in cosmic sources, and the magnetic field 
of the galaxy. Prerequisite; Physics 18, and Mathematics 13, 14 or 19. 

Offered in 1968-69 and alternate years. 



45 THE DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS OF ASTRONOMY AND PHYSICS 

(Also called Physics 45 and Mathematics 45) Mr. Green 

The principal ordinary and partial differential equations as well as certain 
integral equations of astronomy and physics are discussed. Attention is given 
to the properties and the relations between such special functions as Legen- 
dre, associated Legendre, Bessel, hypergeometric, and confluent hypergeo- 
metric. An introduction to Sturm-Liouville theory is presented. Approximate 
solutions are sought by perturbational, variational, iterative, and numerical 
procedures. Examples are chosen from such fields as Hamilton-Jacobi theory 
as applied to problems of the motion of the satellites, planets, and charged 
particles in the solar system, quantum mechanics as applied to nuclear, 
atomic, and molecular structure and certain scattering problems, diffusion 
problems, aerodynamics, and radiative transfer. Prerequisites: Physics 19 
and Mathematics 13, 14 or 19, or consent of the instructor. 

Offered in 1969-70 and alternate years. 



46 STELLAR EVOLUTION AND THE ORIGIN OF THE ELEMENTS 

Mr. Green 

The theory of stellar structure is reviewed and the problem of stellar evolu- 
tion is discussed on the basis of the theoretical and observational evidence. 
The significance of the results for the origin of the elements is considered. 
Prerequisite: Physics 19, and Mathematics 13, 14 or 19. 

Offered in 1968-69 and alternate years. 



81, 82 SPECIAL TOPICS IN ASTROPHYSICS Mr. Green 

The content of this course may vary from year to year, but will usually deal 
with the determination of the abundance of the elements in stellar atmos- 
pheres. In this latter case the observational material will be high dispersion 
spectra obtained at one of the major American observatories. It may be 
repeated for credit. Prerequisite: considerable maturity in mathematics, phy- 
sics and astronomy. 



100 SENIOR DEPARTMENTAL STUDIES Mr. Green 

64 



D 



***0n sabbatical leave 1968-69. 

tAppointed on the Sloan-Foundation Grant. 



65 



Q 
< 



BIOLOGY 

Associate Professor Irving Finger, Chairman 

Professor Ariel G. Loewy*** Q 

Professor Melvin Santer |* 

Assistant Professor Dietrich Kessler Q 

Assistant Professor Edward YAROSHf 

Assistant Professor Michael Showe 

Assistant Grace Stoddard 

The biology program is designed to give a solid foundation in general 
biological principles, an insight into recent developments of experimental 
aspects of the field, and an opportunity for a research experience in the 
senior year. Special emphasis is placed on molecular and cell biology. 

Biology 11 and 12 are designed primarily for students not intending 
to major in biology. 

The prospective biology major normally takes no biology in his fresh- 
man year, but instead prepares himself for work in biology by taking 
chemistry and perhaps mathematics or physics. 

Students with a strong high school background in chemistry may, with 
permission of the department, take Biology 21-22 in their freshman year. 

The courses designed for the major program are built up in a series of 
three stages: 

(1) One full year sophomore course (21-22), which introduces the 
student to cellular, microbial, and developmental biology. 

(2) Four advanced courses (31, 32, 33, 34) to be taken at the junior 
or senior level, designed to create sufficient competence for 
research in the senior year. 

(3) One Senior Research Tutorial taken for single or double credit 
(chosen from 61-62, 63-64, 65-66, 67-68) involving reading of 
current literature, laboratory research, student lectures and semi- 
nars, and a senior thesis. The topics of these research tutorials 
lie in the areas of principal interest of the instructors. Senior 
Research Tutorials may be started with the consent of the in- 
structor during the junior year. Students have the opportunity 
to apply for a summer research stipend which enables them to 
begin their research in the summer following their sophomore 
and junior years. Qualified chemistry or physics majors may be 
admitted to the Senior Research Tutorials with consent of the 
instructor. 

Biology 100, a senior seminar taken at half intensity for both 



semesters. It consists of student papers and discussions, faculty 
presentation of research problems, and the year's Philips 
program. 

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS 

Biology 21-22; Biology 31, 32, 33, 34; one year-sequence of biology courses in 
the 60's; Biology 100; Chemistry 13, 14 or Chemistry 15; Chemistry 25, 26. 
Where prerequisites are required for these courses, the student must achieve a 
grade of at least 70 unless otherwise stated, or receive the consent of the in- 
structor to apply them as prerequisites. 

A student who prefers to emphasize a more thorough preparation in the 
physical sciences has the option of replacing Biology 33 and 34 with two 
semester courses in chemistry, physics, or mathematics upon consultation with 
his major adviser. 

The department strongly recommends the following additional courses since 
they provide a minimum theoretical background for advanced work in biology: 
Mathematics 13, 14, or 19, 20; Physics 13, 14, or 19, 20; Chemistry 16, 21, 22. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR HONORS 

Since all biology majors participate in the departmental senior research pro- 
gram, they are all candidates for departmental honors. These are awarded upon 
consideration of the following criteria of achievement: (a) grade average in 
courses, (b) senior research and thesis, (c) performance in Biology 100. 

GENERAL COURSES PRIMARILY INTENDED FOR NON-BIOLOGY MAJORS 

11 HEREDITY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY Mr. Yarosh 
Three hours; no laboratory 

A study of the mechanism responsible for biological inheritance. Lectures 
will emphasize key experiments in the development of modern genetic theory 
as well as the theory itself. Assumes no previous knowledge of science. 

12 BIOLOGICAL PROBLEMS FROM MICROBES TO MAN Staff 
Three hours; no laboratory 

This course will consider four separate topics, both for their intrinsic interest 
as well as for their ability to illustrate aspects of the scientific method. The 
following topics will be discussed: (a) the physical basis of inheritance 
(genes and chromosomes) and the changes in living things that have oc- 
curred throughout time (evolution); (b) how studies with microorganisms 
have contributed to our understanding of some important biological prin- 
ciples; (c) studies of living systems which shed light on problems of de- 
velopment and behavior; (d) the origin of man and his development through 
pre-history. Assumes no previous knowledge of science. 

36 EVOLUTION, GENETICS AND THE SCIENTIFIC METHOD Mr. Yarosh 
Three hours; no laboratory 

A seminar on the origin, propagation, and evolution of species. Relevant 
contributions of the past two hundred years will be examined in historical 
context to illuminate the mutual development of ideas and empirical obser- 
vation in this field. Darwin's On the Origin of Species and Mendel's Experi- 
ments in Plant Hybridization will be among those direct sources studied in 
detail. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. Not open to students who 
have had Biology 11 or 35. 
Offered in 1968-69. 

66 



COURSES PRIMARILY INTENDED FOR STUDENTS 
WITH PREREQUISITES IN CHEMISTRY 

21-22 CELL STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION Staff 

Four hours; three lectures and one laboratory period each week 

An introductory course in cell biology which combines the areas of cytology, 
biochemistry, biophysics, genetics, microbiology and some developmental 
biology. The purpose of this course is to integrate these diverse approaches 
into a unified view of cell structure and function. This is a sophomore 
course, although freshmen with adequate preparation in chemistry can 
qualify with permission of the instructor. Students who wish to postpone 
the course to the junior year should obtain permission of the instructor at 
the end of their freshman year. Prerequisite: Chemistry 13, 14 or 15, or 
consent of the instructor. 

31 CELL BIOLOGY I: STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION OF PROTEINS 
AND NUCLEIC ACIDS Mr. Showe 

Four hours; three lectures and one laboratory period each week 

A study of the structure and properties of proteins and nucleic acids. Em- 
phasis is placed on physical-chemical and organic-chemical approaches to the 
study of biological macromolecules. Prerequisite: Biology 21-22; Chemistry 
25 should be taken previously or concurrently. 

32 CELL BIOLOGY II: METABOLIC BIOCHEMISTRY AND BIOSYN- 
THESIS OF MACROMOLECULES Mr. Santer 

Four hours; three lectures and one laboratory period each week 

A study of the various pathways of carbohydrate metabolism and of me- 
tabolic processes leading to ATP synthesis. The biosynthesis of amino acids 
and nucleotides, DNA, RNA and proteins and the biochemical evidence for 
the regulatory mechanisms which govern the production of macromolecules. 
Prerequisite: Biology 31 or consent of the instructor. 

33 CELL BIOLOGY III: CYTOLOGY AND DIFFERENTIATION 

Mr. Kessler 
Four hours; three lectures and one laboratory period each week 

A study of intracellular structure and function emphasizing morphological 
and biochemical methods. Pertinent problems in cell differentiation are con- 
sidered. Seminars are organized around discussions of original journal ar- 
ticles. Laboratory projects provide an introduction to cytochemistry with the 
light and electron microscopes. Prerequisite: Biology 21-22. 

34 CELL BIOLOGY IV: HEREDITY AND REGULATION Mr. Finger 

Four hours; three lectures and one laboratory period each week 

The topics to be emphasized are the structure and mutability of genes, trans- 
mission and storage of genetic information, and the transcription of this in- 
formation into specific macromolecules. Cytoplasmic control of gene expres- 
sion and other mechanisms for the regulation of gene activity also will be 
discussed. Prerequisite: Biology 21-22, or consent of the instructor. 

67 



35 READING COURSE IN EVOLUTIONARY THEORY Mr. Finger 

The purpose of this course is to enable the student to acquaint himself with 
evolutionary theory, both current and past, by reading advanced textbooks, 
reviews and scientific journals. Prerequisite: Biology 11 or 21-22, and consent 
of the instructor. 

61-62 SENIOR RESEARCH TUTORIAL IN MOLECULAR 

MORPHOGENESIS Mr. Showe 

Student research on the molecular basis of structure formation. Laboratory 
work is supplemented with readings related to the area of investigation and 
with the presentation of discussions by students. Prerequisite: Biology 31 or 
consent of the instructor. 

63-64 SENIOR RESEARCH TUTORIAL IN CELL BIOCHEMISTRY 

Mr. Santer 

Student research on the chemical composition and hereditary control of 
cytoplasmic particles involved in protein synthesis. Laboratory work is 
supplemented with readings from the current literature and seminars by 
students on material related to the research. Prerequisite: Biology 31 or 32 
or consent of the instructor. 

65-66 SENIOR RESEARCH TUTORIAL IN PHYSIOLOGICAL GENETICS 

Mr. Finger 

The major problem to be studied is the regulation of gene activity. Pre- 
requisite: consent of the instructor. 

67-68 SENIOR RESEARCH TUTORIAL IN EXPERIMENTAL CYTOLOGY 

Mr. Kessler 

Studies on the localization and structure of actin-like proteins from various 
cell types. Ultra-structural studies will be undertaken by electron micro- 
scopy. Various immunological methods will be employed. Prerequisite: 
Biology 33 or consent of the instructor. 

81, 82 PROJECTS IN BIOLOGY Staff 

Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. 

100 SENIOR DEPARTMENTAL STUDIES Staff 

A senior seminar which meets one evening each week consisting of: 

(a) Presentation for discussion of research plans and research results 
by students and faculty. 

(b) Participation in the department's Philips visitors program. 

(c) Presentation by students of "Comprehensive Papers" on contem- 
porary developments in experimental biology providing an oppor- 
tunity for library research and for the writing of a paper. 

(d) A written, open-book "Comprehensive Examination" testing the 
student's ability to synthesize and analyze the material in the course 
work. 

Students should register for Biology 100 in both the fall and 
spring terms, since the work of the course will be distributed 
through two semesters. Course credit is given, however, only for 
second semester. 

68 



CHEMISTRY f) 

Associate Professor Harmon C. Dunathan, Chairman J 

Professor Colin F. MacKay j|| 

Associate Professor John P. Chesick ^ 

Assistant Professor Robert M. Gavin, Jr. S 

Assistant Professor Oliver C. Zafiriou §n 

The program in chemistry is designed to develop familiarity with T 
that science as an intellectual discipline. This approach both serves Jj 
the function of contributing to the liberal education of non-professionals, ^ 
and provides a sound basis for professional work in chemistry and 
related sciences. The courses are planned as a sequence which each 
student is encouraged to enter at as advanced a level and to complete 
as rapidly as his background and abilities will permit. Able students 
then have available a substantial block of time in the senior year for 
serious pursuit of a laboratory research problem, and for independent 
correlation and extension of the material presented in the individual 
courses. 

A major who plans to continue study in chemistry is advised to 
include Chemistry 32 and 34 as well as German 13, 14 or Russian 
11, 12 in his program. 

The chemistry major program will give the student a broad back- 
ground in areas of chemistry between chemical physics and chemical 
biology without strong emphasis in either direction. Students particu- 
larly interested in these interdisciplinary areas are urged to consult the 
chemistry faculty about their course programs. For the courses in chem- 
istry required for pre-medical preparation, see page 52. 

A grade of 4 or 5 on the CEEB Advanced Placement Examination in 
chemistry will assure placement in Chemistry 15. A grade of 5 may allow 
placement in Chemistry 25 or Chemistry 16. School records, recom- 
mendations and the results of our placement examination are the decid- 
ing factors. 

All students taking their first course in the department are required 
to take a placement examination given during freshman week. 

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS 

Chemistry 13, 14 (or 15), 16, 21, 22, 25, 26, 31, 51, and 100; Mathematics 
13, 14 (or 19), and Physics 13, 14 (or Physics 19). 

A student interested in an area of chemistry related to another discipline may, 
in consultation with the department, work out a major program which substitutes 
upper level courses in other departments for selected required chemistry courses. 

A student must earn a grade of at least 70 in those courses listed as prerequisite 
to an advanced course in order to qualify for admission to the advanced course. 

69 



REQUIREMENTS FOR HONORS 

Students who are considered qualified will be invited to become candidates for 
departmental final honors during the second semester of the junior year. Honors 
candidates will be expected to complete a senior research problem at a level 
superior both in quality and quantity of effort to that expected in normal course 
work. Research work extending through two semesters is usually expected of a 
candidate for departmental final honors. A final paper and oral presentation of 
the work will be expected. The award of final honors by the department will be 
based upon superior performance in the research problem, in major courses, and 
in the senior comprehensive examinations. 

13, 14 PRINCIPLES OF CHEMISTRY 

Mr. MacKay and Mr. Chesick; Mr. Zafiriou and Mr. Gavin 

Four hours; three lectures and one laboratory period each week 
Atomic structure, bond properties, molecular architecture and chemical 
energetics are studied as a means of understanding chemical reactivity. The 
chemical behavior of species ranging from simple ionic forms to complex 
biomolecules is considered. 

15 PRINCIPLES, STRUCTURE, AND BONDING Mr. Gavin 

Four hours; three lectures and one laboratoiy period each week 

A rapid survey of the topics covered in Chemistry 13, 14. Admission will be 
based upon the student's preparation and past performance in chemistry (see 
the statement above). May not be taken for credit after Chemistry 13, 14. 

16 THE PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY OF EQUILIBRIUM SYSTEMS 

Mr. Chesick 
Four hours; three lectures and one laboratory period each week 
A study of thermochemistry, chemical equilibrium, and the first two laws of 
thermodynamics. Laboratory exercises will consist of the quantitative study 
of various equilibrium systems. Prerequisite: Chemistry 14 or 15; Mathe- 
matics 13, 14 (may be taken concurrently); or Mathematics 19. 

21 THE PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY OF REACTING SYSTEMS Mr. Chesick 
A study of electrochemistry, colligative and transport properties of solu- 
tions, the phase rule and phase equilibria, reaction rates and chemical 
kinetics, surface and polymer chemistry. Laboratory exercises will consist 
of the quantitative study of systems related to the lecture topics. Prerequi- 
site: Chemistry 16. 

22 INTRODUCTION TO QUANTUM AND STATISTICAL MECHANICS 

Mr. Chesick 

An introduction to quantum mechanics with applications to problems in 
chemical bonding and molecular spectroscopy and structure. The final portion 
of the course is devoted to discussion of distribution laws and elementary 
topics from statistical thermodynamics. The computer is used in illustrativi 
problem work. 

Prerequisites: Chemistry 16 and Physics 14 (may be taken concurrently)' 
or Physics 19. Chemistry majors with an interest in chemical physics may 
substitute Chemistry 303b and Chemistry 304a at Bryn Mawr College 

70 



\ 



25, 26 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY Mr. Zafiriou and Mr. Dunathan 

Four hours; three lectures and one laboratory period each week 

A survey of the chemistry of the functional groups common in organic 
compounds, and of the elementary theoretical basis of organic chemistry. 
Prerequisite: a grade of 70 or higher in Chemistry 14 or 15. 

31, 32 LABORATORY IN CHEMICAL STRUCTURE AND REACTIVITY 

Mr. MacKay and Mr. Dunathan 
Two laboratory periods each week 

This course integrates inorganic, organic and physical chemistry concepts 
in a broad laboratory study of structure and its relationship to chemical 
reactivity. A variety of spectroscopic methods are introduced as structural 
and analytical tools. Chemical kinetics, isotopic labeling, chromatography 
and other physical methods are used in studies of reactions of inorganic 
and organic compounds. These include photochemical and enzyme catalyzed 
reactions. The experiments are "open-ended" and students are encouraged 
to design their own approach to the questions investigated. Prerequisites: 
Chemistry 26 and, concurrently. Chemistry 21. 

34 ADVANCED PHYSICAL AND INSTRUMENTAL METHODS 
LABORATORY 

One lecture and two laboratory periods each week 

Laboratory study of the applications of spectroscopic. X-ray, and other 

methods to the determination of molecular structure, and of the reactive 

and nonreactive interactions of molecules and ions. Prerequisite: Chemistry 

21, 22 (may be taken concurrently). 

Not offered in 1968-69. 

43 APPLIED MATHEMATICS FOR CHEMISTS 
Offered at Bryn Mawr College as Chemistry 304a 

44 QUANTUM MECHANICS OF ATOMS AND MOLECULES 
Offered at Bryn Mawr College as Chemistry 303b 

51 INORGANIC CHEMISTRY Mr. Gavin 

Lectures on theoretical and systematic descriptive inorganic chemistry. 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 22. 

55 ADVANCED ORGANIC CHEMISTRY Mr. Zafiriou 

Selected topics from the fields of stereochemistry and organic reaction mech- 
anisms. Prerequisite: Chemistry 26. 
Offered in 1968-69 and alternate years. 

56 BIOCHEMICAL MECHANISMS Mr. Dunathan 

The organic chemistry of proteins, polypeptides, and polynucleotides. The 
theory and mechanism of enzyme action. Selected biological problems of 
chemical interest. Prerequisite: Chemistry 26. 

71 



61, 62 RESEARCH TUTORIAL IN PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY 

Messrs. Gavin, Chesick and MacKay 

Directed research in problem (s) of molecular structure determination, 
quantum chemistry, hot atom chemistry, gas phase reaction kinetics and 
photochemistry, or one of a selected group of topics in inorganic chemistry. 

63, 64 RESEARCH TUTORIAL IN ORGANIC CHEMISTRY Mr. Dunathan 

Directed research in areas of physical-organic chemistry and biochemistry. 
Topics include studies of the mechanism of action of enzymes utilizing 
pyridoxal phosphate as a cofactor and problems in organic photochemistry 
and chemiluminescence. Laboratory work extending through tv/o semesters is 
usually expected of a candidate for departmental final honors. A final paper 
and oral presentation of the work will be expected. 

100 SENIOR SEMINAR AND COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION Staff 

Chemistry 100 will be conducted as a seminar devoted to the review and 
application of the fundamental principles of the discipline. The emphasis 
will be on appropriate topics of current research interest suggested by the 
lectures of Philips visitors, selected colloquia and professional society 
speakers, and faculty research. Active student participation will be encour- 
aged by discussion of current student research and related literature surveys. 
It is expected that the work of the semester course unit of Chemistry 100 
will be distributed throughout the school year to take advantage of guest 
lecturers. The principles and applications will be covered by a final com- 
prehensive examination to be given in May. 

Students should register for Chemistry 100 in both the fall and spring terms, 
since the work of the course will be distributed through two semesters. 
Course credit is given, however, only for second semester. 



72 



CLASSICS Q 

Associate Professor Daniel J. Gillis, Acting Chairman f 

Professor Howard Comfort** ^ 

Associate Professor Edward M. Michael in 

Visiting Lecturer Grace Simpson$ m 

The Classics Department offers instruction in the language, litera- ~ 
ture, and civilization of the Greek and Roman peoples. Principal empha- O 
sis is laid upon meeting the Greek and Roman legacy through the III 
medium of the original languages, but courses in Classical Civilization 
offer opportunities to study ancient history and literature in English 
translation. 

Two major programs offer students an opportunity either to specialize 
in the ancient world or to follow the Classical Tradition into its later 
manifestations. 

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS 

Two major programs are available in this department: 

A. Classics Major: twelve semester courses divided between Greek and Latin, 
of which two must be either Classics 31, 32 or 33, 34 or 81, 82; Classics 100; 
a written examination in translation from Greek and Latin, to be taken at a 
time set by the department, ordinarily not later than the second week of the 
second semester of the senior year. If a candidate fails this examination the 
department will decide when he may repeat it. 

B. Classics and the Classical Tradition Major: a specific program, to be 
approved by the department, involving at least one ancient language and one 
modern field of study, and a substantial paper; eight semester courses in Greek 
or Latin; four semester courses in the related field in other departments; Classics 
100; a written examination in translation from Greek or Latin. If a candidate 
fails this examination the department will decide when he may repeat it. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR HONORS 

A. Classics Major: an average of 85 or better in classics courses during the 
junior and senior years; a grade of 85 or better in the translation examinations; 
either a substantial paper written during the senior year and due on or before 
May 1 on a topic approved by the department, or the completion of 300 pages 
of reading in Greek and Latin during the junior and senior years in addition 
to normal course assignments, the material to be chosen in consultation with 
the department; a one hour oral examination on honors and course work. 

B. Classics and the Classical Tradition Major: Requirements are the same 
as for honors in Classics except that courses in the related field outside the 
department are to be counted in computing the grade average; the student will 
not have the option of substituting reading in Latin and Greek for the paper, 
which may be a substantial extension of the paper required for the Major; the 
oral examination will cover both ancient and later parts of the candidate's 
special field. 



**0n sabbatical leave, second semester, 1968-69. 
tOn appointment, second semester, 1968-69. 



73 



COURSES IN GREEK LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 

11-12 ELEMENTARY GREEK Mr. Michael 

Intensive study of the elements of the language followed by reading of the 
Ion of Plato and the Alkestis of Euripides. 

21 INTRODUCTION TO GREEK LITERATURE Mr. Gillis 

Readings in Homer's Iliad and Odyssey, with lectures and reports on the 
Homeric world. Prerequisite: Classics 11-12 or the equivalent. 

22 INTRODUCTION TO GREEK LITERATURE Mr. Gillis 

Reading of Greek lyric poetry, with special emphasis on the techniques of 
literary criticism, and one oration of Lysias. Prerequisite: Classics 21 or 
permission of the instructor. 

31 GREEK LITERATURE OF THE FIFTH CENTURY: POETRY 

Mr. Michael 
Reading of two or three of the tragedies of Sophocles, plus critical study 
of his other plays in English translation. Prerequisite: Classics 21 or 22 or 
the equivalent. 
Offered in 1968-69 and alternate years. 

32 GREEK LITERATURE IN THE FIFTH CENTURY: PROSE 

Mr. Michael 

Readings in the Histories of Herodotus and Thucydides, with special atten- 
tion to literary aspects of the works. Prerequisite: Classics 21 or 22 or the 
equivalent. 
Offered in 1968-69 and alternate years. 

33, 34 GREEK LITERATURE IN THE FOURTH CENTURY AND LATER 

Mr. Gillis and Mr. Michael 

Study of Demosthenes, Aristotle, and other authors as dictated by the needs 
of the students enrolled. Students majoring in Classics will be afforded 
opportunities to practice Greek composition. May be repeated for credit 
with change of content. Prerequisite: Classics 21 or 22 or the equivalent. 
Classics 34 may be taken without 33. 
Offered in 1969-70 and alternate years. 

COURSES IN LATIN LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 

13-14 ELEMENTARY LATIN Mr. Comfort and Mr. Michael 

Basic instruction in Latin declension and conjugation; then Cicero's In 
Catilinam I, nearly all the poems of Catullus, and selected Letters of Pliny. 
Offered on sufficient demand. 

15 LATIN LITERATURE I: PROSE Mr. Comfort 

Review of grammar and vocabulary; reading of five or six major orations 
of Cicero. Prerequisite: Classics 13-14 or two or three years of preparatory 
Latin. 

16 LATIN LITERATURE I: POETRY Mr. Gillis 

Vergil's Aeneid I, IV, VI and selections. Prerequisite: Classics 13-14 and 
15 or 17 or the equivalent at the discretion of the instructor. 

74 



17 LATIN LITERATURE II: COMEDY Mr. Michael 
Reading of two plays of Plautus and two of Terence as examples of the 
Roman comic spirit, with emphasis on the vis comica and theatricality of 
the plays. Prerequisite: Classics 15, 16 or four years of preparatory Latin. 

18 LATIN LITERATURE II Mr. Michael 
Readings in the Augustan poets. 

23 LATIN LITERATURE III Mr. Comfort 
Systematic study of one or more aspects of Latin literature and Roman life. 
Prerequisites at the discretion of the instructor. This course may be repeated 
for credit with change of content. 

24 LATIN LITERATURE III 

Not offered in 1968-69. 

81, 82 PROJECTS IN CLASSICS Staff 

Prerequisites at the discretion of the instructor. 

COURSES IN CLASSICAL CIVILIZATION NOT REQUIRING THE USE OF 

GREEK OR LATIN 

19 CLASSICAL CIVILIZATION: GREEK HISTORY AND LITERATURE 

(Also called History 19) Mr. Gillis 

Study of the significant events and trends of ancient Greece, of the chief 
works of Greek literature in English translation, and of the Greek legacy 
to the modern world. 

20 CLASSICAL CIVILIZATION: ROMAN HISTORY AND ARCHAEOLOGY 

(Also called History 20) Miss Simpson 

Study of the significant events and trends of ancient Rome, with emphasis 
upon Roman historical writers and lectures illustrating the archaeology of 
Italy and the Western Provinces. 

29 SEMINAR IN GREEK CIVILIZATION 

(Also called History 29) 

Reading in translation of extensive portions of Greek literature, together with 

a study of the history of the age, within the framework of a designated topic 

of importance. Seminar papers and reports offer opportunities to individual 

students to emphasize either literature or history. May be repeated for credit 

with change of content. 

Offered in 1969-70 and alternate years. 

30 SEMINAR IN ROMAN CIVILIZATION Miss Simpson 
(Also called History 30) 

Roman Archaeology, including inscriptions, and Roman historical authors, 
illustrated by slides. Seminar papers and reports offer opportunities to indi- 
vidual students to emphasize either archaeology or history. May be repeated 
for credit with change of content. 
Offered in 1968-69 and alternate years. 

DEPARTMENTAL COURSES 

81, 82 PROJECTS IN CLASSICS Staff 

Prerequisites at the discretion of the instructor. 

100 SENIOR DEPARTMENTAL STUDIES Staff 

Not offered in 1968-69. 

75 




.ft.. 



. '^fell'^'-f ^•- 



ECONOMICS in 

Professor Holland Hunter, Chairman U 

President John R. Coleman Q 

Professor Howard M. Teaf, Jr. 2 

Assistant Professor Samuel Gubins ^ 

Assistant Professor Bruce N. Robinson |^ 

On joint appointment with Bryn Mawr ~J 

Lecturer Helen M. Hunter r% 

At Bryn Mawr (0 

Professor Morton S. Baratz, Chairman 

Professor Joshua C. Hubbard 
Assistant Professor Richard B. Du Boff 

The work in economics provides a basis for understanding and 
evaluating the operation of the American economy and other types of 
economy. Concepts and analytic methods are presented as aids in for- 
mation of intelligent policy judgments. The introductory courses, Eco- 
nomics 11 and 12, are designed to give the kind of informed perspective 
on economic performance standards that should be part of a liberal 
education. The group of intermediate courses offers a fuller range of 
material on major topics in the field, designed to be useful in relation 
to a wide variety of student interests. The group of advanced courses 
supplies a theoretical and methodological foundation for those who ex- 
pect to make use of economics in their professional careers. In all 
courses students are exposed to the data and primary source material 
that underlie sound economic analysis, and are encouraged to apply 
oral, written, and computer methods in analyzing this evidence. 

The senior major's research project in Economics 61 may, under 
appropriate circumstances, be carried as a double course or be extended 
into the spring semester under Economics 82. 

Men expecting to major in economics are advised to take Economics 
11, 12 in their freshman year. Mathematics 13, 14 or 19, 18 are strongly 
recommended for economics majors. In addition, Mathematics 21 is 
recommended for those who expect to do graduate work in economics or 
business administration. 

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS 

Economics 11, 12; four semester courses from the 20-30 series; four semester 
courses from the 40 series; 61 and 100; and three other approved courses in the 
social sciences or mathematics. The comprehensive examination involves a written 
examination, a short research memorandum, and a brief oral examination. 

77 



REQUIREMENTS FOR HONORS 

Plans for honors work will usually be laid during a student's junior year. An 
honors project will involve a paper of high quality, usually begun in Economics 
61, together with an oral examination by the department and an outside examiner, 

11 INTRODUCTION TO ECONOMICS 

Messrs. Coleman, Gubins, Hunter, Robinson, and Teaf 

Study of the institutions and principles of the American economy, with 
stress on the forces promoting stable growth with minimum inflation and 
unemployment. Diverse readings, class discussion, short paper. 

12 INTRODUCTION TO ECONOMICS 

Messrs. Coleman, Gubins, Hunter, Robinson, and Teaf 

Analysis of the relationships that determine individual incomes and prices, 
the issues that arise in international economic aflfairs, and the problems of 
poverty at home and abroad. Diverse readings, class discussion, short paper. 

(Economics 11 and 12 together present the basic concepts and evidence 
required for an understanding of current economic problems. Normally 
Economics 11 should be taken before Economics 12.) 

21 AMERICAN ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT Mr. Du Boff 

Long-term trends in output, resources, technology; structure of consumption, 
production, distribution; foreign trade and finance; and shorter-term varia- 
tions in business activity and capital investment. Quantitative findings 
provide the points of departure. Prerequisite: Economics 11, 12. 

Offered in 1969-70 and alternate years. 

22 NON-WESTERN ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT Mr. Hunter 

An introduction to the institutional settings and economic patterns that 
account for underdevelopment in poor countries, and a review of efforts to 
overcome barriers to rapid development. Case studies of selected countries 
in Latin America, Africa, or Asia. Prerequisite: Economics 11, 12. 

23 MONEY AND BANKING Mr. Hubbard 

The development and present organization of the money and banking sys- 
tem of the United States; domestic and international problems of monetary 
theory and policy. Prerequisite: Economics 11, 12. 

24 PUBLIC FINANCE AND FISCAL POLICY Mr. Hubbard 

A study of local, state, and Federal revenues and expenditures with par- 
ticular emphasis on the Federal budget; fiscal policy as a positive means of 
shaping public taxation and expenditure so as to contribute to a stable, 
full-employment economy. Prerequisite: Economics 11, 12. 

78 



25b PRIVATE ENTERPRISE AND PUBLIC POLICY Mr. Baratz 

A theoretical and empirical analysis of the structure of industrial markets 
and the behavior of business firms in a competitive economy; legal restric- 
tions on business policy; social and political implications of public regulation 
of private enterprises. Prerequisite: Economics 11, 12. 

26 INTERNATIONAL ECONOMIC THEORY AND POLICY 

The theory and practice of international trade. The balance of payments, 
and the theory of disturbances and adjustment in the international economy. 
Economic integration. Relationships between rich and poor countries, and 
the impact of growth and development on the world economy. Prerequisite: 
Economics 11, 12. 

Not offered in 1968-69. 

29 ECONOMICS OF URBAN POVERTY Mr. Gubins 

Study of economic aspects of urban poverty problems, investment in human 
resources, financing of urban services, relations between income and earnings; 
theoretical and empirical analysis of benefits and costs of poverty programs. 
Prerequisite: Economics 11, 12. 

30 RESEARCH SEMINAR ON HUMAN RESOURCES, 

POVERTY, AND URBAN ECONOMICS Mr. Gubins 

Students will engage in independent, empirical research on selected man- 
power development, poverty, and urban problems of the Philadelphia region. 
Weekly seminars will be concerned with problems arising out of research, 
particularly methodology and conceptual issues. Prerequisite: Economics 29 
or permission of the instructor. 

32 THE SOVIET SYSTEM Mr. Hunter 

(Also called Political Science 32) 

An analysis of the structure and functioning of major Soviet economic, 
political, and social institutions. Current arrangements are studied as prod- 
ucts of historical development. Present performance and prospects are 
evaluated. Prerequisite: two semester courses of economics, political science, 
or history. 

35 WESTERN EUROPEAN ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT Mr. Du Boff 

Selected topics in the economic history of Britain, France, Germany, and 
Italy since 1760 are examined, both theoretically and empirically. Represent- 
ative topics may include the "industrial revolution," technological change, 
demographic trends, the growth of international trade and finance, the 
impacts of the world wars, and the effects of national economic policies. 
Prerequisite: Economics 11, 12. 

Offered in 1968-69 and alternate years. 

79 



36 COMPARATIVE ECONOMIC SYSTEMS Mr. Du Boff 

An historical analysis of economic theory and philosophy (mercantilist, 
physiocratic, classical and neoclassical, Marxian and socialist, and Keynes- 
ian) and their relevance to capitalist institutions and contemporary 
capitalism as a socioeconomic system. Prerequisite: Economics 11, 12. 

Offered in 1969-70 and alternate years. 



37 TECHNOLOGY, WORK, AND LEISURE Mr. Teaf 

Study of the social and personal problems arising out of rapid technological 
change and its effect on the labor force. Responses of unions, employers, 
and public authorities. Arrangements for minimizing insecurity and conflict. 
Prerequisite: Economics 11, 12 or two courses in sociology. 



38 THE MODERN CORPORATION Mr. Teaf 

An analysis of the institutional fundamentals underlying corporate decision- 
making, and a review of ethical issues surrounding corporate performance 
in contemporary society. Prerequisite: Economics 11, 12. 



39 LATIN AMERICAN ECONOMIES AND POLITIES 

{Also called Political Science 39) Mrs. Marshall and Mr. Baratz 

Detailed study of certain basic political and economic problems in Latin 
America. Open to students who have had at least one year of political 
science and one year of economics. Preference is given to those who have 
a reading knowledge of Spanish. 

Offered in 1969-70 and alternate years. 

Offered at Bi-yn Mawr as Interdepartmental 305a. 



41 CORPORATE AND NATIONAL ACCOUNTING Mr. Teaf 

A study of the fundamentals of corporate accounting and their extension 
to the national accounts. Emphasis is placed on the derivation of the major 
reports of businesses and of the national economy. Prerequisite: Economics 
11, 12. Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors. 



43 STATISTICAL METHODS IN ECONOMICS Mrs. Hunter 

An introduction to the concepts and procedures that underlie the quantitative 
analysis of economic and other social data. Frequency distributions, proba- 
bility and sampling, time series, index numbers, regression analysis, com- 
puter programming. Prerequisite: Economics 11, 12. Open to sophomores, 
juniors, and seniors. 

80 



44 INTRODUCTION TO ECONOMETRICS Mrs. Hunter 

Quantitative methods of economic analysis and forecasting are presented in 
class and then used by students in individual projects. Multiple regression 
analysis, econometric models, economic forecasting, use of maximization 
and input-output methods. Prerequisite: Economics 43, Mathematics 18, or 
permission of the instructor. Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors. 



45 MACROECONOMIC ANALYSIS Mr. Gubins 

Rigorous review of the theoretical foundations of income determination, 
monetary phenomena, and economic fluctuations. Introduction to dynamic 
processes. Prerequisite: Economics 11, 12. 



46 MICROECONOMIC ANALYSIS Mr. Gubins 

Systematic investigation of analytic relationships underlying consumer wel- 
fare, efficient resource allocation, and ideal pricing. Introduction to opera- 
tions research. Prerequisite: Economics 11, 12. 



47 DEVELOPMENT ANALYSIS Mr. Hunter 

Theoretical treatment of the structural changes associated with the process 
of economic development, especially in poor countries, and rigorous analysis 
of criteria for policy judgments in development programming. Introduction 
to input-output and linear programming methods. Prerequisite: Economics 
11, 12. 



61 EMPIRICAL SEMINAR Mr. Hunter 

Current problems, selected to accord with student interests, are investigated 

with the aid of economic theory and quantitative methods. Research paper 
required. Prerequisite : permission of the instructor. 



81, 82 INDIVIDUAL PROJECTS Staff 

100 SENIOR DEPARTMENTAL STUDIES Staff 



81 



s 



Q 



ENGINEERING AND APPLIED SCIENCE }f| 

Professor Theodore B. Hetzel, Chairman 2 

Associate Professor Thomas A. Benham Q 

The newly revised and expanded program in engineering and applied 2 
science is designed to provide a sound preparation for a career in en- m 
gineering or industry by a combination of basic engineering courses 
with a broad range of those in the natural sciences, mathematics, social 
sciences, and humanities. 

The creative aspects of engineering are emphasized by involving the ^ 
student in developing special engineering projects, one at an elementary 
level in the sophomore year and another at an advanced level in the 
senior year. These laboratory projects in design and construction will 
take into account not only the technical but also the scientific and social 
implications of the project. 

The introductory course is divided into two distinct elements. The 
first semester, planned primarily for engineering majors, concentrates 
on engineering design. The second semester is an entirely new course 
developed both for students in engineering and in the social and natural 
sciences as well. It will center around problems of numerical methods 
and procedures involving the use of linear algebra, differential and 
integral calculus, and elementary statistics, making extensive use of the 
College's IBM 1620 digital computer. 

The courses for the engineering major plus the general College re- 
quirements in the natural and social sciences and the humanities, to- 
gether with several free electives, constitute a program such as is some- 
times called "General Engineering," or "Engineering Administration." 

Haverford graduates with a major in engineering who wish to carry 
on further technical training in engineering are granted advanced stand- 
ing in undergraduate engineering schools or are admitted to graduate 
schools. Those engineering majors who seek employment in leading 
industrial firms have found that their preparation at Haverford has 
prepared them well for engineering employment and also for future study 
and training. 

Our students profit by the opportunities in the Philadelphia area to 
visit industrial plants and to attend meetings of technical societies. 

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS 

Engineering 12, 21, 24, 25, 26, 32, 61 or 62, 100; Mathematics 13; Physics 13; 
Economics 11, 12; and two additional courses above the introductory level, 
from engineering, mathematics, or the natural sciences, chosen in consultation 
with the Engineering Department. 

83 



11 INTRODUCTION TO ENGINEERING DESIGN Mr. Hetzel 
One class and two laboratory periods a week 

This course includes the principles and conventions of engineering graphics, 
including pictorial drawing and descriptive geometry; the materials and 
methods of production; the components of machines and their kinematic 
analysis. 

12 NUMERICAL METHODS 

The course will emphasize methods which are suitable for high speed 
electronic computers. Extensive use will be made of the IBM 1620. The 
following topics will be discussed: systems of linear equations, interpolation 
polynomials, numerical integration and differentiation, difference methods, 
ordinary linear differential equations, propagation of errors, and commonly 
used statistical techniques. Prerequisite: Mathematics 13 (or the equivalent). 

21 ANALYTICAL MECHANICS Mr. Hetzel 

A study of statics, kinematics, and dynamics. Forces in equilibrium, friction, 
moments of inertia, plane motion, work and energy, impulse and momen- 
tum, mechanical vibrations. Prerequisite: Mathematics 13. 

23 MATHEMATICAL METHODS IN ENGINEERING Mr. Benham 
Use of such advanced mathematical techniques as infinite series, transforms, 
Bessel functions, and complex variable. Problems are chosen from various 
fields of engineering. Prerequisite: Mathematics 13; Physics 13; Engineering 
12, or consent of the instructor. 

24 ENGINEERING DESIGN Messrs. Benham and Hetzel 

Ofie class and two laboratory periods a week 

The group will choose a feasible problem, consider the technical, economic 
and social aspects; and invent, design and construct a solution to the problem. 

25 INTRODUCTION TO ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING Mr. Benham 

Four hours, including one laboratory period a week 

Direct and alternating current circuits and machines; transient phenomena. 
Engineering 23 recommended. 

26 INTRODUCTION TO ELECTRONICS Mr. Benham 

Four hours, including one laboratory period a week 

Electronic devices, magnetic and control circuits, radiation and detection of 
electromagnetic waves, transmission systems. Prerequisite: Engineering 25. 

32 THERMODYNAMICS Mr. Hetzel 

A study of energy, its sources, liberation, transfer, and utilization; gases, 
vapors, and their mixtures; theoretical and actual thermodynamic cycles for 
power and refrigeration. 

84 



41 MECHANICS OF MATERIALS Mr. Hetzel 

A study of beams, shafts, columns, vessels, and joints, acted upon by simple 
and combined stresses. Prerequisite: Engineering 21 or Physics 19. 



42 INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES Mr. Hetzel 

The thermodynamics, fluid flow, and performance of internal combustion 
engines. There will also be consideration of fuels, carburetion and injection, 
etc. and several laboratory investigations of engine performance. Prerequisite: 
Engineering 32, or consent of the instructor. 



43 CIRCUIT THEORY Mr. Benham 

Four hours, including one laboratory period a week 

Networks, resonance, integrating and differentiating systems, and filters. 
Prerequisite: Engineering 25 and 26 (which may be taken concurrently), 
or consent of the instructor. 

Offered in 1968-69 and alternate years. 



44 ADVANCED ELECTRONICS Mr. Benham 

Four hours, including one laboratory period a week 

Amplifiers, rectifiers, oscillators, pulse height analyzers. Prerequisite: En- 
gineering 43 or Physics 20, or consent of the instructor. 

Offered in 1968-69 and alternate years. 

45 COMMUNICATION THEORY Mr. Benham 

Review of communication systems; study of the theory and problems asso- 
ciated with noise; introduction to information theory. Prerequisite: consent 
of the instructor. 

Offered in 1969-70 and alternate years. 

61, 62 PROJECTS Staff 

Engineering majors are required to do at least one semester of individual 
work in some special field of investigation, such as the engineering of a 
project with consideration of its technical, industrial, commercial, and 
sociological aspects. 

100 SENIOR DEPARTMENTAL STUDIES Staff 

85 



ENGLISH 

Professor Alfred W. Satterthwaite, Chairman 

Professor Ralph M. Sargent 

Professor John A. Lester, Jr. 

Professor Craig R. Thompson*** 

Professor John Ashmead, Jr. 

Professor Edgar Smith Rose 

Professor Frank J. Quinn 

Assistant Professor James C. Ransom 

Assistant Professor Vicki W. Kramer 

Lecturer Richard Lubarsky 

Lecturer Doris S. Quinn 

The Department of English aims to make accessible to students their 
cultural heritage in English and to help them perfect their reading and 
writing skills. These aims are reciprocal. Only if students read well are 
they able to possess their heritage; only if they realize through literature 
the full resources of language will their own writing attain the desired 
level of effectiveness. 

Many students who choose to major in English intend to pursue 
some aspect of the subject professionally: to proceed to graduate 
school, to teach literature, or to undertake a literary career. The 
program of the department provides preliminary education for all these 
purposes. The study of literature in English is recommended likewise 
to those students who intend to enter a non-literary profession such as 
law, government service, the ministry, medicine, or business. The depart- 
ment welcomes such students. 

Enghsh 11-12 is a required course; it provides tutorial instruction 
in writing and practice in literary interpretation. Beyond the freshman 
year the department offers a variety of complementary courses embrac- 
ing the study of literature in its temporal and cultural setting, move- 
ments, figures, genres, literary theory and criticism, and the art of writing. 

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS 

Two major programs are available in the Department of English. 

A. Major in English Literature: English literature from the Renaissance to 
the end of the nineteenth century in a six-course sequence: English 23, 24, 33, 34, 
43, 44, normally taken in order; three other courses within the department, 
including one in the 60's; English 100. 

A student has the option of taking all six courses of the sequence, or of taking 
only four or five provided he chooses at least two from English 23, 24, 33 
and two from English 34, 43, 44, and provided he assumes responsibility for 



***On sabbatical leave 1968-69. 



86 



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independent study of the readings in the course or courses not taken. In any |f| 
case the minimum requirement for the major is ten semester courses. 

Two semesters in a classical literature (in Greek, Latin, or English) or in a 
modern literature (French, German, Spanish, or Russian) may be counted IJI 
toward the English major. 

B. Major in English and American Literature: English Literature from the 
Renaissance to the end of the eighteenth century in a four-course sequence: 
English 23, 24, 33, 34, normally taken in order; American literature from colonial 
times to the end of the nineteenth century: English 35, 36; three other courses J 
within the department, two of these in American literature; English 100. A 
student has the option of substituting independent study for one of the English 
courses in the four-course sequence. In any case the minimum requirement is 
ten semester courses. 

Courses in English taken at Bryn Mawr College (under the terms specified on 
page 56 of this catalog) may count toward the major in either program. 

The comprehensive examination will consist of ( 1 ) synoptic questions testing 
the student's grasp of the materials of the six-course sequence in English literature 
(Program A), or of the combined sequence in English and American literature 
(Program B), (2) specific questions focused on the student's particular field of 
interest as approved in advance of the examination by the major adviser, and 
(3) critical questions on the appreciation, analysis, and interpretation of particular 
literary works. 

Students who plan to proceed to graduate work are reminded that virtually 
all graduate schools require a reading knowledge of both French and German, 
and some of the leading ones require a knowledge of Latin, also, for the Ph.D. 
degree in English. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR HONORS 

Students whose work shows superior achievement will be invited to become 
honors candidates at the end of their junior year. Candidates for honors must 
achieve an overall average of 85 or better in English courses (including 100) 
completed in their junior and senior years. 

Each honors candidate must submit a substantial paper which demonstrates 
his ability to handle critically and to present in scholarly fashion an acceptable 
literary subject. This paper must be in the hands of the chairman of the depart- 
ment not later than May 1st of the student's senior year. To be accepted for 
honors this paper must, in the judgment of the English faculty, reveal superior 
achievement. 

Final honors are awarded on the basis of achievement in courses, an honors 
project, and the comprehensive examination. High honors are granted on the 
further evidence of distinction in an oral examination. 

11-12 READING AND WRITING ON HUMAN VALUES 

Messrs. Sargent, Lester, Ashmead, Quinn, Satterthwaite, Rose, 
Ransom, and Lubarsky. Mmes. Kramer, and Quinn 

Chairman: Mr. Ashmead 
Two class meetings and one tutorial meeting weekly. 
Readings in the humanities and tutorial instruction in writing. 

20 THE ART OF POETRY Mr. Quinn 

The analysis and interpretation of selected poems in terms of tone, image, 
metaphor, diction, prosody, theme, symbol, and myth. 

87 



21 GENERAL COURSE IN ENGLISH LITERATURE (I) Mr. Lester 

Major figures in English literature from the Beowulf poet to Milton (in- 
cluding Shakespeare). 

22 GENERAL COURSE IN ENGLISH LITERATURE (II) Mr. Lester 

Major figures in English literature from the early eighteenth century to 
the present. 



23 LITERATURE OF THE ENGLISH RENAISSANCE (I) 

Messrs. Sargent and Satterthwaite 

A critical study of the poetry, prose, and drama of the Elizabethan age. 
The first of the period courses designed primarily for students intending to 
major in English literature. 

24 LITERATURE OF THE ENGLISH RENAISSANCE (II) 

Messrs. Sargent and Satterthwaite 

A critical study of poetry, prose, and drama from the late Elizabethan 
period through the early Stuart reigns. Prerequisite: English 23 or consent 
of instructor. 



28 LITERATURE AND LINGUISTICS Mr. Ashmead 

(See General Courses, Linguistics 28) 

30 THE RISE OF THE NOVEL Mr. Rose 

A concentrated study of selected works of fiction from Defoe to Austen, 
employing such concepts as plot, character, setting, theme, style, mimesis, 
and point of view. 

31 THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE NOVEL Mr. Lester 

Narrative fiction from Austen to Joyce. Prerequisite: English 30 or consent 
of instructor. 

33 THE AGE OF MILTON Mr. Satterthwaite 

Selected works by Milton in the context of metaphysical poetry, baroque 
prose, and Restoration drama. Prerequisite: English 24 or consent of 
instructor. 



34 THE NEOCLASSICAL MOVEMENT Mr. Rose 

A study of some of the major neoclassical works from Dryden to Johnson, 
with attention to critical theory, satire, drama, and the periodical essay. 
Prerequisite: English 33 or consent of instructor. 

88 



I 



35 AMERICAN LITERATURE TO WHITMAN Mr. Ashmead 
Chiefly devoted to Poe, Hawthorne, Melville; Emerson, Thoreau, Whitman. 
Not offered in 1968-69. 

36 AMERICAN LITERATURE FROM WHITMAN TO DREISER 

Mr. Ashmead 
Chiefly devoted to Whitman, Dickinson, Lanier; Twain, Howells, James; 
Melville, Crane, Dreiser. Prerequisite: English 35 or consent of instructor. 
Not offered in 1968-69. 



MAN'S UNIVERSE IN THE NEW AMERICAN REPUBLIC 

Mr. Ashmead 
The emphasis will be on the opposing views of Emerson and Hawthorne, 
with some consideration of the reflections of this opposition in the American 
tradition. And there will be some opportunity to consider the relevance of 
this debate for contemporary America. The literary form of the works read 
will be treated as an essential part of their meaning. No prerequisite. 



38 THE LITERATURE OF WAR AND THE LITERATURE OF PEACE 
IN AMERICA Mr. Ashmead 

The course will center on the contrasting solutions of Henry James and 
Ernest Hemingway. TTiere will be some consideration of other major 
American literary responses to its wars in poetry, fiction, drama, and protest 
literature, ranging from Thoreau and the Mexican War, to current folk rock 
songs about the Vietnam War. The literary form of the works will be 
treated as an essential part of their meaning. 

39 SHAKESPEARE Mr. Sargent 

Extensive reading in Shakespeare's plays. Prerequisite: English 21, 22, or 
23, 24 or consent of instructor. 

40 CREATIVE WRITING Mr. Ashmead 

Practice in writing imaginative literature. Chiefly confined to prose fiction. 
Regular assignments, class discussions, and personal conferences. Prerequi- 
site: junior standing and consent of the instructor. 

43 THE ROMANTIC PERIOD Mr. Ransom 

Critical reading in the literature of the English romantic tradition. Prerequi- 
site: English 34 or consent of instructor. 

44 THE VICTORIAN PERIOD Mr. Lester 

Readings in the controversial, critical, and imaginative literature of the 
period. Prerequisite: English 43 or consent of instructor. 

89 



45 BRITISH LITERATURE OF THE TWENTIETH CENTURY Mr. Quinn 

Selected writers in poetry, prose, and drama. Prerequisite: two courses in 
English above the freshman level. 



46 AMERICAN LITERATURE OF THE TWENTIETH CENTURY 

Mr. Ransom 
Selected writers in poetry, prose, and drama. Prerequisite: two courses in 
English above the freshman level. 



47 LITERARY THEORY AND CRITICISM Mr. Rose 

(Also called Philosophy 47) 

A systematic exploration of various approaches to literature. Readings in 
aesthetics, criticism, and imaginative literature. Discussions and critical 
papers. Prerequisite: two literary courses above the freshman level. 



48 MODERN AMERICAN DRAMA 

Modern American drama from O'Neill to the present, together with sig- 
nificant television plays and movies. 
Not offered in 1968-69. 



49-50 EUROPEAN THOUGHT AND LETTERS, 1100-1600. 
(Also called History 49-50) 

History of ideas in the later Middle Ages and Renaissance, with emphasis 
on the relations between literature and the philosophical and religious 
development of the epoch. The course begins with consideration of medieval 
universities. Authors read include Abelard, Aquinas, Dante, Petrarch, Eras- 
mus, More, Montaigne, Hooker, Bacon, and others. In addition to the 
required reading, students are given opportunity to follow some relevant 
topic of special interest to them. 

Offered in 1969-70 and alternate years. 



61 CHAUCER AND THE CHAUCERIANS Mr. Quinn 

A study of the Canterbuiy Tales, Troilus and Criseyde, Chaucer's prose, and 
the work of Henryson and Dunbar. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. 
Enrollment limited. 



62 TOPICS IN SHAKESPEARE Mr. Sargent 

Close study of a few plays. Seminar. Prerequisite: English 23, 24, or English 
39, or consent of the instructor. Enrollment limited. 

90 



63 TOPICS IN AMERICAN LITERATURE Mr. Ashmead 

1968-69: American short fiction: Poe, Henry James, Hemingway. 



65 TOPICS IN AMERICAN LITERATURE Mr. Rose 

1968-69: T. S. Eliot 



66 TOPICS IN ENGLISH LITERATURE Mr. Ransom 

1968-69: Wallace Stevens 

81, 82 PROJECTS Staff 

Project courses consist of individual study and writing under the supervision 
of a member of the department. They are available only to advanced 
students and are offered only at the discretion of individual teachers. Candi- 
dates for honors are expected to undertake, in the last semester of the senior 
year, a project leading to the honors paper. 

100 SENIOR DEPARTMENTAL STUDIES Staff 

A required course for majors, English 100 reviews the work of the major 
program in preparation for the Comprehensive Examination through (1) 
assignments in literature and in literary history, and (2) regular meetings 
devoted to the answering of sample questions in oral recitation, with 
criticism thereof. 



FINE ARTS 

11 SCULPTURE Mr. Oxman 

An introduction to the basic principles of art through the medium of 
sculpture. Life and portrait modelling preparatory to individual creation; 
aesthetic analysis of works of sculpture. Slide lectures and field trips will 
enrich studio work. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Enrollment limited. 

Also offered in second semester as lib. 



FRENCH 

(See Romance Languages) 

91 



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GENERAL COURSES 

HUMANITIES 1-2-3-4 THE WESTERN TRADITION 

Messrs. Gillis, Gutwirth, Lane, and J. Thompson 

A double-credit course which must be taken as a sequence of four semesters. 
The first year will be spent on readings in the epic and historical literature, 
poetry, drama, religion and philosophy of the ancient world. The second 
year will be devoted to reading major texts from Dante to Freud, with 
additional exploration of the artistic achievements of the West since the 
Middle Ages. Students will write frequent papers and participate in small 
tutorial groups. Enrollment will be limited to 16 freshmen. Students taking 
this course will not register for English 11-12. 

HUMANITIES 21-22 INTERPRETATION OF LIFE IN WESTERN LITERA- 
TURE Messrs. Butman, Ransom, and Rose 

A study in their entirety of selected literary and philosophic works which 
are great imaginative presentations of attitudes toward life. The course spans 
Western culture from Homer to the present, and the readings are drawn 
from all the major literatures of the West, in the best available translations. 
Stress is laid on student involvement in issues raised by these books; con- 
sequently, the class work is handled entirely by the discussion method. 

HUMANITIES 45-46 INTERDEPARTMENTAL SEMINAR 

Study of a literary genre or of the thought and letters of a particular period 
across national and linguistic boundaries. Individual students will be expected 
to take a leading part in the discussion of works falling within their major 
subjects. Faculty consultants will be called in from time to time to lecture 
or participate in the discussion of specialized topics. A reading knowledge 
of one foreign language relevant to the topic is required. Limited to 12 
students. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. 
Not offered in 1968-69. 

LINGUISTICS 21, 22 INTRODUCTION TO LINGUISTICS Miss Dorian 

The first semester deals with anthropological linguistics; the second, with 

historical and descriptive linguistics. 

Offered at Bryn Mawr as Interdepartmental Course 308. 

LINGUISTICS 28 LINGUISTICS AND LITERATURE Mr. Ashmead 

(Also called English 28) 

An application of recent linguistic analysis of literature (grammar, syntax, 
poetics, and stylistics, including theories of computer analysis of literature) 
to selected English and American poetry and prose. In part, the course will 
be structured around visits by researchers on linguistics and literature, and 
on computer analysis of literature. For those who require it, there will be 
individual review of necessary background in new grammar and phonetics, 
partly through programmed instruction. 
Offered only in 1968-69. 

92 



I 



PHYSICAL SCIENCE 36 HISTORY AND PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE 

(Also called Philosophy 36) Mr. Green 

This course is designed for the non-science major and the science major alike. 

The rise of modern science is discussed against the background of 16th 

and 17th century thought. The history of mechanics is carried forward to III 

the relativity theory, and the history of optics and atomic structure leads to h 

the quantum mechanics. The development of our ideas as to the nature of ^ 

science is described and the implications of such concepts as the relativity D 

of space and time, the indeterminacy principle, and complementarity, are 

discussed. Prerequisite: the consent of the instructor, or a semester of college 

mathematics. 

Not offered in 1968-69. 



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SOCIAL SCIENCE 24 SEMINAR IN CONTEMPORARY SOCIAL AND C 

POLITICAL ISSUES Mr. Wehr ]] 

(Also called Sociology 24) IH 

Interested students will select the topic for study in advance of the term jji 
and will be involved in designing the approach, developing a bibliography, 111 
and suggesting relevant resource people to be brought in during the term. ff| 
The criteria for selection of topics will be student and faculty interest, and 
relevance vis-a-vis the current social-political scene. Options might range 
from an examination of the imperatives for structural change in American 
social and political institutions to an exploration of definition of self in a 
world of violence. Enrollment limited to fifteen students. 

SOCIAL SCIENCE 25 SOCIAL CONFLICT AND NONVIOLENT 

RESOLUTION Mr. Wehr 

(Also called Sociology 25) 

Various theoretical approaches will be applied to contemporary instances of 
violent and nonviolent conflict between groups and organizations, ranging 
from urban riots to civil wars. The course will draw upon the work of 
Ardrey, Lorenz, Simmel, Coser, Boulding, Parsons, Mills, and others and 
will include a section on the theories and techniques of nonviolence as one 
approach to conflict resolution. 

SOCIAL SCIENCE 38 AFRICAN CIVILIZATION: TRADITIONS AND 

TRANSFORMATIONS Mr. Glickman, Mr. MacGaffey and Visitors 

A study of selected problems of society and the individual in contemporary 
Africa. The approaches of several social science disciplines will be utilized 
to explore the meaning of "change" and "development." The issues raised 
by a search for a synthesis of values and policies will be emphasized. Areas 
covered include: the character of emergent political systems, social restratifi- 
cation, economic development, the re-discovery of African history, artistic 
and literary expressions. The seminar will be organized around visits by 
experts in each of the areas covered; additional classes will integrate the 
materials discussed. Research papers or interpretive essays. Prerequisite: one 
year of social science and one year of humanities and consent of the 
instructor. 

93 






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GERMAN Q 

Associate Professor John R. Gary, Chairman w 

Assistant Professor Richard P. Jayne ^ 

Assistant Professor Edward F. Bauer d 

Lecturer Maria Marshall ° 

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The program in German is designed to give the student some facihty 
in hearing, speaking and reading the German language. After this prep- 
aration the student is able to approach masterpieces of German literature 
through a careful study of style and structure, of artistic and moral inten- 
tions. The student is led, furthermore, to a broader understanding of the 
human heart and mind, and to a heightened perception of artistic 
achievement. A reading in the original of the works of major writers 
such as Lessing, Goethe, Schiller, Hofmannsthal and Mann will enrich 
his acquaintance with some of the best in his own Western cultural 
heritage. 

German 11-12, 13-14, 15-16 and 21 are primarily language courses. 
All students offering German for entrance are placed at the level where 
they can presumably profit best by the course, according to a placement 
test given by the department. 

Opportunity is given to students who complete elementary or inter- 
mediate German with distinction to advance rapidly into higher courses 
by passing a special examination on a prescribed program of collateral 
reading. 

Residence in the German House (Yarnall House) and participation 
in the German Club afford an opportunity for supplementary oral 
practice. A language laboratory is available. 

Students who might profitably spend their junior year in Germany 
are encouraged by the department to apply for admission to the insti- 
tutions sponsoring foreign study groups. 

Students majoring in German are encouraged to spend a summer in 
Germany or in a German-speaking country. Foreign summer schools 
and projects sponsored by the American Friends Service Committee 
and other organizations offer exceptional opportunities in this regard. 

The German departments of Haverford College and Bryn Mawr 
College cooperate in order to offer the widest possible range of courses 
to students in both colleges. One course (Haverford 37; Bryn Mawr 
306a) is offered jointly. Bryn Mawr German courses open to Haverford 
students are listed on page 98. 

95 



MAJOR REQUIREMENTS 

German 31 and one other period course; German 35 and one other genre 
course; German 43, 44, 100. Supporting courses to be arranged in conference with 
the major supervisor. A comprehensive examination. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR HONORS 

Honors in German will be awarded on the basis of a consistently high perform- 
ance in the literature courses — at least one of which must be a project course — 
and a grade of 90 or better in the comprehensive examination. High honors will 
be awarded on the basis of a further oral examination. 

1-2 ELEMENTARY AND INTERMEDIATE GERMAN 

A double-credit course, meeting five times a week, offering a foundation of 
the language with emphasis on the aural-oral method. Increased importance 
is given to reading as the course progresses. Satisfies the foreign language re- 
quirement. Enrollment limited to 12 students. 
Not offered in 1968-69. 

11-12 ELEMENTARY GERMAN Staff 

The aural-oral method is emphasized. Reading is stressed increasingly as the 
course progresses. German 1 1 meets five times a week with corresponding 
reduction in outside preparation. This course is not open to freshmen who 
have had over two years of high school German. 

13-14 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN: READING AND AURAL 

COMPREHENSION Messrs. Bauer, Gary and Jayne 

Emphasis on the acquisition of reading skills and ability to understand spoken 
German. Works of literary and cultural interest will be read. Prerequisite: 
German 1 1-12 or a satisfactory performance on a placement test. 

15-16 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN: CONVERSATION, COMPOSITION, 

AND READING Mrs. Marshall 

Especially recommended, in place of German 13-14, for those students who 
wish to improve their ability to speak and write German. Development of 
reading ability is also part of the course. Prerequisite: German 11-12 (or a 
satisfactory performance on a placement test) and consent of the instructor. 

21 CONVERSATION AND COMPOSITION Mr. Bauer 

Intended for students who desire to strengthen their proficiency in speaking 
and writing German. Selected works of contemporary prose and poetry are 
read and discussed in German. Oral reports and compositions. Prerequisite: 
permission of the department. 

22 READINGS IN GERMAN LITERATURE Mr. Jayne 
Prose and poetry, essay and fiction from various periods. Discussion, reports, 
papers, lectures in German. Not a survey course. Prerequisite: German 21, 
or permission of the department. 

96 




LESSING, GOETHE, SCHILLER Mr. Gary 

Selected major works of these writers. Lectures, discussion, essays. Pre- 
requisite: German 22 or the equivalent. 

Not offered in 1968-69 

CLASSICS OF THE NINETEENTH CENTURY Mr. Gary 

A survey of German literary developments from the death of Goethe to 
Hauptmann and Nietzsche. Lectures, discussion, essays. Prerequisite: German 
22 or the equivalent. 

Not offered in 1968-69. 

MODERN GERMAN LITERATURE Mr. Jayne 

A survey of German literary developments from 1870 to the present: poetry, 
drama, prose fiction. Lectures, discussion, essays. Prerequisite: German 22 
or the equivalent. 

Not offered in 1968-69. 

GERMAN LYRIC POETRY 

Study of the work of various major poets from Goethe to the present. 
Various critical approaches will be discussed and used. Lectures, discussion, 
essays. Prerequisite: German 22 or the equivalent. 
Not offered in 1968-69. 

GERMAN DRAMA Mr. Banziger and Mr. Gary 

Study of selected major themes and playwrights. Emphasis will be on the 
confrontation of the individual with political and philosophical authority. 
Prerequisite : consent of the instructor. 

Offered in 1968-69 jointly with Bryn Mawr. 

THE GERMAN NOVELLE Mr. Bauer 

Study of the genre and literary technique of the Novelle through reading 
and discussion of representative works of the 19th and 20th centuries. Pre- 
requisite: German 22 or the equivalent. 
Offered in 1968-69. 

ADVANCED TOPICS IN GERMAN LITERATURE Mr. Jayne 

The modern German novel in the context of the Existentialist Movement: 
A survey of Rainer Maria Rilke, Hermann Broch and Robert Musil. Pre- 
requisite: consent of the instructor. 
Offered in 1968-69. 

ADVANCED TOPICS IN GERMAN LITERATURE Mr. Gary 

The Faust theme in literature and folklore. Emphasis will be on Goethe's 
Faust and Mann's Dr. Faustus. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. 

Offered in 1968-69. 

97 



81, 82 SPECIAL PROJECTS IN GERMAN LITERATURE 

Messrs. Bauer, Cary and Jayne 

This course offers the student of German Hterature an opportunity to probe 
more deeply and more independently into a problem or an area in which he 
is particularly interested. The nature of the course will therefore vary to suit 
the needs of each individual student. 

100 SENIOR DEPARTMENTAL STUDIES 

Conferences on selected writers. Members of the department will share in the 
conducting of the conferences, which will focus on the works of authors to 
be included on the comprehensive examination. 

COURSES OFFERED AT BRYN MAWR 

300b GERMAN LITERATURE FROM THE BEGINNING TO THE 

BAROQUE Miss Holli 

An intensive survey of the literature of the Middle Ages, Humanism and 
the Reformation, and representative works of the Baroque period. The older 
works will be read in modern German translations. Prerequisite: consent of 
the instructor. 

306b MODERN GERMAN DRAMA Mr. Banziger 

Trends in modern German drama from the nineteenth century to the Theater 
of the Absurd. Emphasis will be on the plays of Brecht and Diirrenmatt. 
Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. 



98 



HISTORY J 

Associate Professor John P. Spielman, Jr., Chairman 

Professor Wallace T. MacCaffrey*** 

Professor Craig R. Thompson*** 

Professor Edwin B. Bronner 



***0n sabbatical leave 1968-69. 

tOn appointment first semester, 1968-69. 



99 



Cfl 

H 




Visiting Professor F. Smith Fussner H 

Associate Professor Roger Lane ^ 

Visiting Associate Professor Seymour MANDELBAUMf 
Assistant Professor Linda G. Gerstein 

The courses in history are designed to give some conception of the 
development of the civilizations which exist in Europe, in the Near 
East, and in the United States today. Since history is the story of what 
men have done, it is related to every other field in the curriculum, 
but the limitation of time forces a selection of those aspects of human 
activity which can be treated in any course. An attempt is made to 
give a reasonably rounded view of those developments which are deemed 
most important in the period under consideration as a background for 
understanding other subjects in the fields of the humanities and the 
social sciences. With a variation of emphasis in each course, caused in 
part by the nature of the growth of civilization in the period and in part 
by the amount and the kind of historical evidence which has survived, 
attention is given to such phases of development as the political, con- 
stitutional, social, economic, religious, and intellectual. History 11-12 
is intended to be an introductory course, and, although it is not a pre- 
requisite for the election of any other course in the department, it is 
required for those who major in history. 

The study of history provides a background against which current 
problems of internal and external policies may be viewed to advantage. 
It also helps to develop critical standards for the evaluation of evidence 
which can often be applied in forming opinion with regard to the solu- 
tion of such problems. Finally, it is useful as a foundation for pro- 
fessional studies not only in history but also in such subjects as public 
administration, journalism, and law. 

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS 

History 11-12 (or Humanities 3-4) and four other full year courses (or three 
full year courses and two half year courses) in history; History 100. 

Two full year courses or their equivalent in related departments. At least two 
semesters of these courses must be in courses numbered 21 or higher. 



Majors in history must take at least one year course in each of three of the 
following fields: 1) Ancient History, 2) Medieval European History, 3) Modern 
European History, 4) North or South American History. Two comprehensive 
examinations are given, each three hours in length. The first is uniform for all 
majors and examines general ability to handle historical material and problems. 
For the second comprehensive examination each student is required to select a 
special field (a list of special fields offered is available from the chairman of the 
department) which will form the subject of that examination; History 100 will 
be used by the student to prepare for this examination. Students opting for a 
special field in Modern European or Medieval European history will be expected 
to have a competence in French or German; those in Ancient history a compe- 
tence in Latin or Greek. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR HONORS 

Honors will be granted to those senior majors whose cumulative grade average 
for all college courses in their fifth, sixth, and seventh semesters is 82 or better; 
who have an average of 85 or better in all history courses and who earn a 
comprehensive examination grade of 85 or better. High honors may be awarded 
to students showing unusual distinction in meeting all these criteria. 



COOPERATION WITH BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

The history departments of Haverford College and Bryn Mawr College cooper- 
ate in arranging their oflferings so as to enrich as much as possible the oppor- 
tunities open to students in both institutions. Two courses (Haverford 21-22 and 
25-26; Bryn Mawr 202 and 225) are offered jointly. These courses are given 
each year, alternating from one college to the other. Bryn Mawr history courses 
open to Haverford students are listed on pages 103-104. 

11-12 INTRODUCTION TO WESTERN CIVILIZATION 

Messrs. Spielman, Fussner, and Mrs. Gerstein 

A study of Western European civilization from the fall of Rome to the 
present. The course will be concerned with the principal institutions and 
with the major intellectual currents in Western European history. Firsthand 
materials as well as secondary historical accounts will be the basis for 
conference discussion. 

Open to freshmen and sophomores only. 

19 CLASSICAL CIVILIZATION: GREEK HISTORY AND LITERATURE 

(See Classics 19) Mr. Gillis 

20 CLASSICAL CIVILIZATION: ROMAN HISTORY AND ARCHAEOLOGY 

(See Classics 20) Miss Simpson 

21-22 AMERICAN HISTORY Mr. Lane 

American history from colonial times to the present. 

100 



I 



23-24 MEDIEVAL EUROPEAN CIVILIZATION 

(Also called Religion 23-24) 

A survey of Western European civilization from the fall of Rome to about 

1300, including detailed study of religious thought and institutions as well as 

major political and economic development. Occasional lectures, extensive 

reading, papers, and discussion, with a final examination. 

Not offered in 1968-69. 

25-26 EUROPE SINCE 1848 Mrs. Lane 

The main political, social, and cultural development of the European states 
since the mid-nineteenth century, and their diplomatic relations and imperial 
expansion. The first semester extends to the First World War. 
Offered in 1968-69 at Bryn Mawr as History 225. 

27 THE IMPRESSIONIST ERA Mr. Raskin 

(See French 23) 

29 SEMINAR IN GREEK CIVILIZATION 

(See Classics 29) 

Offered in 1969-70 and alternate years. 

30 SEMINAR IN ROMAN CIVILIZATION Miss Simpson 
(See Classics 30) 

Offered in alternate years. 

33-34 HISTORY OF ENGLAND TO 1960 Mrs. Samuels and Miss Robbins 

The treatment is topical, although a general chronology is maintained. 
Prehistoric, Roman, Saxon, Norman and later English society, constitutional, 
economic, and intellectual development are among the subjects studied. 
Ireland, Scotland and Wales receive special attention. 
Offered in 1968-69 at Biyn Mawr as History 201. 

36 THE PROTESTANT REFORMATION Staff 

(See Religion 36) 

Offered in 1968-69 and alternate years. 

37-38 REVOLUTIONARY EUROPE Mr. Spielman 

The political, intellectual, and technological revolutions in Europe from 
1763 to 1848. 

Offered alternately at Bryn Mawr College as History 204. 

40 HISTORY AND PRINCIPLES OF QUAKERISM Mr. Bronner 

(Also called Religion 40) 

The Quaker Movement is studied in relation to other intellectual and reli- 
gious movements of its time, and in relation to problems of social reform. 
The development of dominant Quaker conceptions is traced to the present 
day and critically examined. The course is designed for non-Friends as well 
as for Friends. Open without prerequisite to sophomores, juniors, and seniors. 

101 



41 TOPICS IN AMERICAN HISTORY Mr. Mandelbaum 

Class discussion and papers based on readings in the sources and secondary 
works. May be repeated for credit with change of content. Topic for 1968-69: 
Differentiation and Division in American Urban Society from 1920 to the 
Present. 



43-44 HISTORY OF RUSSIA Mrs. Gerstein 

A topical study of Russian history from Kiev to the death of Lenin. The 
first semester will deal with the problem of Russian medieval culture, the 
growth of Muscovite absolutism, and the impact of the West in the 
eighteenth century; the second semester will cover modernization, the 
growth of the radical intelligentsia, and the Russian Revolution to 1924. 



45b SEMINAR IN THE HISTORY OF WESTERN RELIGIOUS THOUGHT 

(See Religion 45b) Mr. Slater 



49-50 EUROPEAN THOUGHT AND LETTERS, 1100-1600 Mr. C. Thompson 
(See English 49-50) 

Offered in 1969-70 and alternate years. 



51 TOPICS IN REGIONAL HISTORY Mr. Bronner 

A study of the institutional and cultural developments of the Delaware 
Valley beginning with the pre-colonial period. The history of Pennsylvania 
both as a colony and as a state will be emphasized. Students will prepare 
research papers based upon the rich manuscript resources available in this 
region. 



55 TOPICS IN MODERN EUROPEAN HISTORY Mr. Spielman 

Seminar meetings and an extensive paper based on reading in source ma- 
terials and secondary works. May be repeated for credit with change of 
content. Topic for 1968-69: the French Revolution, 1787 to 1795. Prerequi- 
site: a reading knowledge of French. 



56 TOPICS IN MODERN EUROPEAN HISTORY Mrs. Gerstein 

Class discussion and papers based on reading in the sources and secondary 
works. May be repeated for credit with change of content. Topic for spring 
1968-69: The Second International: revolutionary practice and Socialist 
theory. Prerequisite: History 11-12 and permission of the instructor. 



57 TOPICS IN BRITISH HISTORY Mr. Fussner 

Class discussion and papers based on reading in the sources and secondary 
works. May be repeated for credit with change of content. Topic for fall 
1968-69: England, 1560-1640. Prerequisite: History 11-12. 

102 



58 HISTORIOGRAPHY AND THE PROBLEMS OF REVOLUTION 

Mr. Fussner 
A consideration of the problems faced by the historian in the investigation 
of revolution as an historical phenomenon. Discussion, wide reading, and 
papers. Primarily for history majors but open to interested students with 
adequate background. Instructor's consent required. 



81, 82 PROJECT COURSES IN HISTORY Staff 

100 SENIOR DEPARTMENTAL STUDIES Staff 



COURSES OFFERED AT BRYN MAWR 

203b MEDIEVAL CIVILIZATION Mrs. Samuels 

Western European development in the high Middle Ages. Economic, institu- 
tional and intellectual developments in the major kingdoms of the West 
and the history of the Latin Church will be included. 

207 LATIN AMERICA: COLONIES AND REVOLUTION Mrs. Dunn 
In the first semester the conquest of South America, the transplantation and 
modification of European institutions, the colonial society, economy and 
culture will be studied; in the second semester, the revolutionary movements 
and the establishment of new nations. 

Offered in 1969-70. 

208 THE BYZANTINE EMPIRE Mr. Brand 

Political, institutional, and cultural history of the Byzantine (Later Roman) 
Empire from the reforms of Diocletian and conversion of Constantine to 
the capture of Constantinople in 1453. Contacts with Arabic, Turkish, 
Armenian, Slavic and West European peoples will be stressed. 
Offered in 1969-70. 

210 TOPICS IN THE HISTORY OF THE NEAR EAST Mr. Silvera 

A survey of the European impact on the Ottoman Empire and the Arab 
world in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Among the topics to be 
studied will be the legacy of Islam, the imperial policies of Great Britain 
and France, the rise of Arab nationalism. 
Offered in 1969-70. 

212a THE CLOSING OF THE MIDDLE AGES: EUROPE IN THE 

FOURTEENTH CENTURY Mr. Airo-Farulla 

The course will deal with the decline of the Medieval Church and the 
spread of heresy; the conflict between Church and State; the Hundred Years 
War; the closing of the European frontier; early Italian humanism. 

103 



212b RELIGIOUS STRUGGLES AND THE RESHAPING OF EUROPE: 

1555-1648 Mr. Airo-Farulla 

The course will take up topics such as the Spanish Empire under Philip II, 
the Catholic Reformation and the expansion of Calvinism, the Thirty Years 
War, the emergence of absolutism in France, the impact of the expansion 
of Europe overseas. 



213a MINORITY PEOPLES IN THE UNITED STATES Mr. Dudden 

An introductory program of investigations into the uneven results of 
acculturation, assimilation, and emancipation. This course will encourage 
students to undertake biographies within selected social groupings, and it 
will also be directed towards the problem of achieving social biography 
in an aggregate sense. Numerous reports will be required as well as a 
semester's essay. For sophomores and juniors only. 



306b GREAT HISTORIANS Miss Robbins 

Each week the work of one or two historians is read and discussed in 
relations to the historical and scholarly presuppositions of its age. Emphasis 
is laid on reading and analysis rather than on any attempted survey of 
historical literature. The course, however, pursues a roughly chronological 
order starting with the Greeks and ending with Spengler and Toynbee. 



309a THE EMERGENCE AND DECLINE OF STATES IN EUROPE AND 
ASIA IN THE SEVENTEENTH AND EIGHTEENTH CENTURIES 

Miss Robbins 

Among topics discussed will be: the decline of Spain, Poland, and the 
Mogul Empire; the ascendancy of France; the rise of Sweden, Russia, 
Prussia, the Manchu Dynasty; mercantilism and the commercial revolution; 
the structure of absolutism, mixed monarchy and federal governments; the 
development and rivalries of the French, English, and Dutch East India 
Companies; religious controversies and movements — Jesuit, Jansenist, 
Deist, Mystic. 



310a MEXICO: A STUDY IN TRADITION AND REVOLUTION, 

HISTORICAL CONTINUITY AND CHANGE Mrs. Dunn 

Emphasis will be placed on cultural conflict; the historical development of 
institutions such as church, hacienda, caciquismo; and on the nature and 
dynamics of the protracted revolutionary movement from Hidalgo to Car- 
denas. Prerequisites: History 207 or Interdepartmental 305a, or by per- 
mission of the instructor. 
Offered in alternate years. 

104 



HISTORY OF ART 9 

Under the co-operative arrangement between the colleges, Haverford P 

students who wish to major in the history of art, or to take advanced -j 

courses in the subject, may do so at Bryn Mawr College. For particulars T 

see the Bryn Mawr undergraduate catalog. in 



MATHEMATICS 

Associate Professor Dale H. Husemoller, Chairman*** 

Assistant Professor David P. Kraines, Acting Chairman 

Assistant Professor Harry L. Rosenzweig 

Assistant Professor Francis X. Connolly 

Instructor Joseph E. Yeager 

The aims of courses in mathematics are: (1) to promote rigorous 
thinking in a systematic, deductive, intellectual discipline; (2) to present 
to the student the direction and scope of mathematical development; 
(3) to foster technical competence in mathematics as an aid to the 
better comprehension of the physical, biological, and social sciences; 
and (4) to guide and direct the mathematics majors toward an interest 
in mathematical research. 

The following sequences are open to qualified entering students: 13, 
14; 13, 16; 13, 18; and 13, 14, 18; and 19, 20. Students will be sec- 
tioned according to their previous background. Students with the equiva- 
lent of one or two semesters of college calculus may be admitted to 
Mathematics 19 only upon consent of the department. 

The more advanced courses cover work in the fields of analysis, 
algebra and topology. The student majoring in the department extends 
his studies into all of these areas. 



***0n sabbatical leave 1968-69. 

105 



> 



21, 22 INTRODUCTION TO THE HISTORY OF ART 

The course is designed as an introduction to the methods and scope of art 
history in the field of Western art from medieval to modern times. Studio ^ 
work, two hours weekly, forms a required part of the course. 

Offered at Bryn Mawr as Histoiy of Art 101. 



n 

(0 



A program consisting of Mathematics 13, 14, 21, and 20 or 22 and 
Mathematics 31 through 34 is especially suited for the needs of the 
physical sciences, while Mathematics 18 deals with those concepts of 
statistics and probabihty which are fundamental to the biological and 
social sciences. The course sequence 13, 16 is especially appropriate 
for the general liberal arts student. 

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS 

Mathematics 21, 22, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 100, and either 61, 62, or 63, 64. 
Recommended collateral courses are Physics 13, 14, 19, 20; Astronomy 45, 
Economics 24, or for prospective actuaries. Economics 11, 12, 23. 

Prescribed parallel reading on the history and general principles of mathe- 
matics. Two written comprehensive examinations, each three hours in length. 

It is recommended that faciUty in reading French and German be acquired 
early in the college course. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR HONORS 

A student may be awarded honors in mathematics on the basis of course work 
in mathematics, performance on the comprehensive examinations, an additional 
oral examination, and general evidence of superior ability, initiative, and interest 
in the study of mathematics. 

13 ONE VARIABLE CALCULUS Staff 

Differentiation and integration of functions of one variable. Applications: 
Taylor's formula and series. Elementary differential equations. 

14 MULTI-DIMENSIONAL CALCULUS AND LINEAR ALGEBRA Staff 
Vectors in n-space. Partial derivatives. Multiple integrals. Theorems of 
Green and Stokes. Divergence theorem. Introduction to linear algebra. Pre- 
requisite: Mathematics 13. 

16 NUMBER THEORY AND THE THEORY OF EQUATIONS Mr. Yeager 

Theory of divisibility and congruence for numbers and polynomials. Topics 
drawn from: quadratic reciprocity law, ruler and compass constructions, 
elementary field and Galois theory. The historical development of these 
topics will be considered. 

18 PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS Mr. Yeager 

Introduction to probability with applications to statistics. Least squares 
approximations. General properties of distribution functions. Prerequisite: 
Mathematics 13. 

19 CALCULUS AND ANALYSIS Mr. Yeager 

Review of calculus. Series. Partial derivatives and multiple integrals. Intro- 
duction to linear algebra. Open to students with a background in calculus, 
but who have not taken Mathematics 13 or 14. Prerequisite: permission of 
the instructor. 

106 




20 ELEMENTARY COMPLEX ANALYSIS Mr. Rosenzweig 

Line integrals. Complex derivatives. Cauchy theorem and residue calculations. 
Elementary conformal mapping. Harmonic functions. Introduction to Laplace 
transforms. Prerequisite: Mathematics 19 or 14. 

21 LINEAR ALGEBRA Mr. Rosenzweig 

Groups. Vector spaces. Linear transformations. Matrices. Eigenvalues and 
eigenvectors. Inner product spaces. Multilinear algebra. Prerequisite: Mathe- 
matics 14 or 18. 

22 ANALYSIS I Mr. Rosenzweig 

The real number field. Rigorous development of differential and integral 
calculus. Metric spaces. Fundamental theorem of ordinary differential equa- 
tions. Prerequisite: Mathematics 21. 

31, 32 ANALYSIS II, III Mr. Connolly 

Differential calculus on Euclidean space. Inverse and implicit function theo- 
rems. The Riemann and Lebesque integrals. Manifolds. Stokes theorem on 
manifolds. Calculus of variations. Prerequisite: Mathematics 21 and 22. 

33, 34 ALGEBRA Mr. Kraines 

Topics will be drawn from field theory, ideal theory of commutative rings, 
group theory, structure of rings. Examples to illustrate the theory will be 
drawn from Mathematics 21. Prerequisite: Mathematics 21 and 22. 

35, 36 TOPOLOGY Mr. Rosenzweig 

General topology. Homotopy theory and fibre bundles. Singular homology 
theory. Prerequisite: Mathematics 21 and 22. 

45 THE DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS OF ASTRONOMY AND PHYSICS 

{See Astronomy 45) Mr. Green 

Offered in 1969-70 and alternate years. 
61, 62 SPECIAL TOPICS IN ALGEBRA AND TOPOLOGY 

63, 64 SPECIAL TOPICS IN ANALYSIS AND GEOMETRY 

Mr. Yeager, Mr. Connolly 

In the first semester of 1968-69, the topic is complex analysis and in the 
second semester, differential geometry. 

100 SENIOR DEPARTMENTAL STUDIES Staff 

Review and correlation of the various branches of mathematics. Content 
varies to fit student needs. This course may be taught as a seminar, a 
tutorial, or a lecture course, depending on student needs. 

107 



c 



MUSIC 

Professor William H. Reese, Chairman 
Associate Professor John H. Davison 

Lecturer Harold Boatrite CD 

The courses offered in music have as their objectives ( 1 ) the mastery n 
of music materials and theory through the discipUnes of counterpoint, 
harmony, and analysis, and subsequently (2) the stimulation of the 
creative energies of the student through musical composition, (3) a 
knowledge of the styles and literature of a great art with its interrela- 
tion of trends, influences, aesthetic principles, personalities, and crea- 
tive processes in musical creation over the centuries, and (4) the de- 
velopment of perceptive listening and refined hearing in connection 
with the aims stated above. The furthering and strengthening of the 
disciplines of music and of music history is of value both to the general 
student and to the student with specialized musical interest and talent. 
For the latter, instruction in instrument or voice can be arranged 
independently, or under the Arts and Service Program (see pages 151- 
153). Advanced and specialized work in musicology is available in the 
form of supplementary courses at Bryn Mawr and Swarthmore colleges 
and the University of Pennsylvania. At Haverford the program seeks 
in part to stimulate free composition in the vocal and instrumental 
forms with a view to public performance of a successfully completed 
work. 

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS 

A rounded course of study of music includes (1) work in theory, possibly em- 
bracing composition, (2) the study of music history, and (3) direct expression in 
music through the medium of instrument or voice. The music major will work in 
both academic fields of theory and history, specializing in one of them. 

Required courses: For specialization in music theory and composition: Music 
11 or 12, 13-14, 23, 24, 31 or 32. 33, 81, 82, 100. For specialization in music 
history: Music 11 or 12, 13-14, 23 or 24, 31, 32, 81, 82, 100. 

Supporting courses are to be arranged in such related fields of the humanities, 
history, language, history of art, and others, as may be approved by the depart- 
ment. 

In addition the music major is expected to reveal a proficiency and interest in 
instrumental playing and/ or choral singing to the degree of participating actively 
in public performances from time to time during his college career. This will 
assure his having a direct experience with the living practice of a creative art. 
In addition, he must demonstrate a keyboard facility sufficient to encompass the 
playing of a Bach chorale and to realize features of his compositions. 

For those specializing in music theory and composition, the comprehensive 
examination for majors will consist of: (1) the completion by the candidate 
of a musical composition for instruments or voices in one of the larger forms, 
(2) an examination in music history, (3) a small composition, theoretical 
analysis, and exercises to be completed during the examination period. 

109 



For those specializing in music history, the comprehensive examination for 
majors will consist of: (1) an examination in music history, (2) analysis of a 
work and other exercises involving theoretical musical knowledge, (3) the 
completion of a paper on an assigned subject in music history. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR HONORS 

The honors candidate must perform satisfactorily in all required courses for 
music majors, and submit (a) in the case of specialization in composition, an 
orchestral composition of considerable stature showing creative talent as well as 
technical craftsmanship, and hence worthy of a public performance, or (b) in 
the case of specialization in music history, a successfully completed project in 
musicological research, demonstrating mastery of the tools of musicological 
research and involving original thought, and showing ability in the creative 
interpretation of assorted materials bearing on a specific subject. 

11 INTRODUCTION TO MUSIC HISTORY Mr. Reese 
A study of the principal forms of musical literature of the 17th, 18th, and 
19th centuries. No previous knowledge of music is required. 

12 SURVEY OF MUSIC HISTORY Mr. Reese 

A historical survey of the development of musical thought from the plain- 
song era to contemporary idioms. This course complements Music 11, but 
may be taken without it. No prerequisite. 

13-14 ELEMENTARY MUSIC THEORY Messrs. Danson and Boatrite 

The basic materials of music — melody, scales, intervals, chords, meter, and 
rhythm. Counterpoint in two and three parts and harmony in four parts will 
be studied and implemented by ear-training, dictation, and sight-singing. 
Previous instruction or experience in some aspect of music is desirable. 

23, 24 ADVANCED THEORY AND COMPOSITION 

Messrs. Boatrite and Davison 

A continuation of Music 13-14, involving ear-training, keyboard harmony, 
sight-singing, analysis, and composition, along with an introductory study 
of strict counterpoint as exemplified in the vocal style of the sixteenth 
century. In the second semester pieces are written in the eighteenth-century 
forms of the chorale-prelude, fugue, suite, and sonatina. Successful student 
compositions will be performed at demonstration concerts. Prerequisite: 
Music 13-14 or the equivalent. 

31, 32 SEMINARS IN MUSIC HISTORY Messrs. Reese and Davison 

The detailed study of certain epochs in music history or of the works of 
individual composers having special significance in the history of music. The 
content of Music 31, 32 will be altered from year to year so that a diversity 
of subject matter will be available. It may be repeated, for credit, with 
change of content. Prerequisite: Music 11 or 12 or the equivalent. 

Topics for 1968-69 

Music 3 1 : The music of J. S. Bach. 
Music 32: Music of the twentieth century. 

110 



I 

F 



33 SEMINAR IN MUSICAL COMPOSITION Mr. Davison 

Continuation of composition in small forms, with emphasis on the con- 
temporary musical language. Representative twentieth century pieces will 
be discussed and analyzed, and the student will, in his own compositions, 
explore such areas of style and technique as modality, synthetic scales, -^ 
secundal and quartal harmony, total chromaticism, irregular meter, and Q 
jazz harmony. Prerequisite: Music 24 or the equivalent. Ill 

36 OPERA Mr. Reese Q 

A brief history, with concentrated investigation of representative works and 
theories. Lectures, reading, analysis, reports. Prerequisite: Music 11 or 12 or 



D 



the equivalent. i 

81, 82 PROJECTS IN MUSIC Staff K 

100 SENIOR DEPARTMENTAL STUDIES Staff 

PHILOSOPHY 

Professor Richard J. Bernstein, Chairman 

Professor Paul J. R. Desjardins 

Associate Professor L. Aryeh Kosman*** 

Assistant Professor Josiah D. Thompson, Jr. 

Assistant Professor Asoka Gangadean 

Assistant Professor Robert H. KANEf 

Visiting Assistant Professor Yehouda Landau 

Visiting Lecturer Ting Shih Chia 

The philosophy curriculum has three major aims. In the first place, 
it attempts to help each student develop a more self-critical attitude 
toward life and the world by means of a confrontation with the thought 
of great philosophers of the past and present. The student is introduced 
to philosophical treatments of such problems as the nature of individual 
and social man, the nature of the world in which he lives, and the 
nature of his apprehension of and response to that world. Secondly, the 
philosophy curriculum is meant to help each student acquire philosophi- 
cal materials and skills which supplement and help integrate his other 
studies, whether in the arts, the social sciences, the natural sciences, or 
religion. Finally, the philosophy curriculum is designed to offer certain 
students a foundation in knowledge and technique for further studies in 
philosophy or related fields at the graduate level. 

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS 

Philosophy 11-12 (or equivalent), 100 and eight other semester courses ap- 
proved by the major supervisor, four from the philosophy department and four 

***0n sabbatical leave 1968-69. 

t Appointed on the Sloan Foundation Grant. 

Ill 



from some other department or departments closely related to the student's 
special study in philosophy. 

A written comprehensive examination and an oral examination. The written 
examination will cover the history of philosophy, ethics, social and political 
philosophy, philosophy of religion, logic, metaphysics, the theory of knowledge, 
and philosophy of science. The oral examination will be based on the written 
examination. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR HONORS 

Honors in philosophy are awarded for special work of high quality, usually in 
the form of a thesis, on an important topic, problem, or philosopher approved 
by the major supervisor. One or more project courses may be used toward this 
end. Honors will not be given unless the candidate has an average grade of at 
least 85 in the comprehensive examination; high honors require an average of 
at least 90. 



11-12 HISTORICAL INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY Staff 

An understanding of the nature and functions of philosophy and its relations 
to other fundamental human concerns such as religion, the sciences, and 
the arts is sought through a study of selected works of the great philosophers 
in Western history. No prerequisite. Closed to juniors and seniors except in 
very special cases. 

13-14 THE ORIGINS OF PHILOSOPHY Mr. Desjardins 

The relative functions of myth, logic, and history in Homer, Hesiod, the 
Pre-Socratics. These themes will be investigated in three non-Western cul- 
tures: Chinese, Japanese, Dogon. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. 

Offered in 1968-69 and alternate years. 



15-16 PHILOSOPHY EAST AND WEST Mr. Desjardins 

Critical examination of theories about the differences between East and 
West in light of selected classical texts: Plato's Republic, the Confucian 
Corpus, the Tao Te Ching, and some early Chinese, Japanese and Buddhist 
literature. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. 
Offered in 1969-70 and alternate years. 

17 LOGIC Mr. Gangadean 

Examination of classical term logic (syllogistic inference, categorical syllo- 
gisms), propositional logic (truth-function theory), and introduction to 
quantification theory. The interrelations between these will be examined. 
Stress will be on logic as a theory of discourse — the connection between 
logic and language will be explored. The above logical theories will be 
applied to inferences and arguments in ordinary discourse. Examination of 
validity, formal proof and properties of a formal system. Some attention 
will be given to inductive inference. 

112 



18 ADVANCED LOGIC Mr. Davidon 

A study of the capabilities and limitations of algorithms for proving or 
refuting conjectures formulated in a first order predicate logic. Topics con- 
sidered include the Godel completeness and incompleteness theorems, de- 
cidable and undecidable theories, and the use of computers for proof searches. 
Some aspects of the foundations of mathematics will be explored. Pre- 
requisite: permission of the instructor. 

21 PLATO Mr. Desjardins 

A study of a selected group of the dialogues. Prerequisite: permission of 
the instructor. 

24 ARISTOTLE Mr. Landau 

A study of a selection of the primary works of Aristotle. Prerequisite: 
permission of the instructor. 

25, 26 RELIGIOUS TRADITIONS IN INDIA AND EAST ASIA Mr. Long 

(See Religion 25, 26) 

29b RELIGIOUS IDEAS IN MODERN CULTURE Mr. Long 

(See Religion 29b) 

31, 32 EARLY MODERN PHILOSOPHY Mr. Landau 

A study of the development of philosophic thought in the seventeenth and 
eighteenth centuries. Attention will be focused on writing of representative 
thinkers. Selections from some of the following: Bacon, Locke, Berkeley, 
Hume, Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. 

34 KANT Mr. Bernstein 

A study of selected major texts with special emphasis on the first Critique. 
Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. 

Offered in 1969-70 and alternate years. 

36 HISTORY AND PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE Mr. Green 
(See Physical Science 36 under General Courses) 

Not offered in 1968-69. 

37 RELIGIOUS ETHICS Mr. Slater 
(See Religion 37) 

38 PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION Mr. Slater 
(See Religion 38) 

39 PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE Mr. Kane 

A study of important philosophical issues raised by the sciences concerning, 
among other topics, the nature of scientific explanation and knowledge, law 
and chance, theory and observation, causality, purpose, freedom and de- 
terminism. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. 

113 



40 PHILOSOPHICAL ISSUES IN THE HISTORY OF SCIENCE Mr. Kane 

The influence upon the general development of Western thought of funda- 
mental revolutions in the history of science and the men who took part in 
them (Copernicus, Galileo, Newton, Darwin and others). Class discussion 
will focus on philosophical issues about the nature of science and scientific 
views of the world as well as on historical issues. Prerequisite: permission 
of the instructor. 



42 SEMINAR IN MODERN PHILOSOPHICAL RELIGIOUS THOUGHT 

{See Religion 42) Mr. Spiegler 

43-44 HEGEL AND POST-HEGELIAN THINKERS 

After a brief review of selected Hegelian texts in their cultural milieu, the 
course of 19th and 20th century philosophy will be examined. Principal 
texts from some of the following movements will be studied: Marxism, 
Existentialism, Phenomenology, and Analytic Philosophy. Prerequisite: per- 
mission of the instructor. 

45 THE PHILOSOPHY OF EXISTENCE 

A study of some of the principal texts of nineteenth-century existentialism. 

Readings in Kierkegaard or Nietzsche. Prerequisite: permission of the 

instructor. 

Not offered in 1968-69. 

46 THE PHENOMENOLOGY OF EXISTENCE 

A study of selected texts in twentieth-century phenomenology. Readings in 
Heidegger, Sartre, or Merleau-Ponty. Prerequisite: permission of the in- 
structor. 

Not offered in 1968-69. 

47 LITERARY THEORY AND CRITICISM Mr. Rose 

(See English 47) 

48 PHILOSOPHY OF LOGIC Mr. Gangadean 

The focus will be on logic as an organon for philosophy. Theory of predica- 
tion will be compared and contrasted with propositional logic and quantifi- 
cation theory. The effectiveness of each as an instrument for dealing with 
typical philosophical questions arising out of ordinary language as well as 
typical metaphysical and ontological questions will be discussed. Such 
meta-logical issues as the relation between intensional and extensional logic, 
between meta-language and object language, between propositional negation 
and predicate denial, between propositional and predicative truth, etc., will 
be examined. Selected writings of Aristotle, Frege, Russell, Ramsey, Quine, 
Strawson, and Sommers will be studied. Prerequisite: Philosophy 17 or 
permission of the instructor. 

114 



50a MODERN ANALYTIC PHILOSOPHY Mr. Bernstein 

A study of the historical and theoretical development of analytic philosophy 
in England and America. Selected writings of Russell, Wittgenstein, Ayer, 
Wisdom, and others with special emphasis on theory of language. Pre- 
requisite: permission of the instructor. 



51b METAPHYSICS AND EPISTEMOLOGY Mr. Gangadean 

A study of conceptions of reality, knowledge and action. Prerequisite: per- 
mission of the instructor. 



52a ETHICS Mr. J. Thompson 

A study of certain major proposals concerning the norms which ought to 
govern human life. Topic for 1968-69: Ethics after Nietzsche. Prerequisite: 
permission of the instructor. 



53 SOCIAL PHILOSOPHY Mr. Bernstein and Miss Shumer 

A critical exploration of the web of problems that concern man's place in 
society. Classical approaches will be studied and the student will be en- 
couraged to apply these approaches to the understanding of the salient social 
problems of his time. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. 
Taught jointly with Political Science 47. 



54 CONTEMPORARY PHILOSOPHIC PROBLEMS Mr. Bernstein 

A study of contemporary treatments of philosophic problems in Europe and 
America. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. 



56 THE LOGIC OF EXPLANATION Mr. Kane 

A study of what the natural and social sciences have to say about the 
nature of the physical world, and the inquiring mind within it. Topic for 
1968-69: Mind and Matter. Prerequisite: Some previous science and phil- 
osophy courses and permission of the instructor. 



81, 82 PROJECT COURSES Staff 

Individual consultation with independent reading and research. Prerequisite: 
permission of the instructor. 



100 SENIOR SEMINAR Staff 

Seminar meetings, aimed at helping senior philosophy majors achieve 
greater comprehension and comprehensiveness with regard to the history of 
philosophy and selected problems. Required of and open only to senior 
philosophy majors. 

115 



I 
-< 



n 

> 



m 
D 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION ^ 

Professor Roy E. Randall, Chairman*^ 

Professor William Docherty, Jr. 
Associate Professor Ernest J. Prudente 

Assistants: Francis E. Dunbar (D 

R. Henri Gordon 

Frederick Hartmann 

Warren K. Horton 

Joseph McQuillan f" 

James Mills 

Richard O. Morsch 

Howard Price 

Frederick C. Schulze, Jr. C 

Dana W. Swan f| 

John B. Wilson ^ 

College Physician: William Lander, M.D. j 

PHILOSOPHY AND AIMS OF THE DEPARTMENT OF 7{ 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION ^ 

The Physical Education Department stresses three elements in its fc 
program: the promotion of physical fitness as beneficial to physical and 
mental health, the attainment of proficiency in sports with "carry-over" 
value, especially in group endeavor, and the development of sportsman- 
ship and community spirit through intramural and intercollegiate com- 
petition. 

The Department aims to guide the student to activities which are 
commensurate with his level of physical development while teaching 
him the physiological and psychological advantages of physical activity. 

The Department places special emphasis on providing facilities for 
and instruction in sports with "carry-over" value. Haverford's courses in 
physical education seek to insure that each student will develop both in- 
terest and proficiency in a sport which he can maintain after graduation. 

The intramural program offers a variety of individual and team 
activities from which the student may derive the rewards and satisfac- 
tions of working with others and of sharing responsibility in a group 
endeavor. Intramurals also provide an important component in the 
recreational offerings of the College. 

The athletic program as a whole, from basic instruction to intercol- 
legiate competition, is concerned with the individual student's develop- 
ment and enjoyment. The sports selected are determined mainly by 
current student interest. 



**0n sabbatical leave, second semester, 1968-69. 

117 



PROGRAM AND REQUIREMENTS 

Freshmen are required to take non-academic work in all three terms. 
At least two terms of physical education are required and physical edu- 
cation must be taken in the fall term of the freshman year. Freshmen 
who demonstrate satisfactory progress in the fall term may petition the 
Non-Academic Programs Committee for permission to take a course from 
the Arts Program or the Community Service Program (see pages 151- 
153) in one of the remaining terms. Sophomores and juniors are re- 
quired to take two terms of non-academic work, at least one of which 
is in physical education. The student may schedule the remaining term 
in the sophomore, junior or senior year. Any student who receives an 
unsatisfactory grade in any term must then take non-academic courses 
every term until he is caught up in his requirements. 

The intercollegiate program consists of varsity and sub-varsity 
schedules in 13 sports: football, soccer, cross country, basketball, 
fencing, swimming, wresding, cricket, baseball, track, golf, tennis and 
sailing. Participation in these activities may be substituted for the 
physical education requirement. The following table summarizes the 
sports activities available. 





Intercollegiate 










Physical 




Varsity and 


Varsity 


Education 




sub-varsity 


only 




fall: 


Football 


Cross Country 


* Touch football 




Soccer 


Sailing 


* Soccer 
*Tennis 
Weight lifting 


winter: 


Basketball 


Swimming 


Badminton 




Fencing 




Handball 




Wrestling 




^Basketball 
^Volleyball i 
Weight lifting 


spring: 


Baseball 


Golf 


* Softball 




Tennis 


Cricket 


*Tennis 




Track 


Sailing 


Golf 



*Intramural competition available 

Evidence of satisfactory physical condition is required by the de- 
partment before a student is permitted to participate in any aspect of 



118 



n 

(D 



the program. A swimming test is given to all entering students. This W 
test must be passed by all students before graduation. Swimming in- ^ 
struction is given in the gymnasium pool during the fall and spring. ~^ 

The outdoor facilities include: Walton Field for football and track "V 
with a 440-yard oval and a 220-yard eight lane straight-away cinder Uf 
track; AV2 mile cross country course within the campus limits; the 
Class of '88 - '22 and Merion Fields — which are used for soccer in 
the fall and Softball in the spring; a skating pond, Cope Field for cricket, 
the Class of '16 Field used for practice football in the fall and baseball 
in the spring; fifteen tennis courts, six of which are all-weather; a driving 
range with green and sandtraps for golf practice, and the privileges of 
Merion West Course for the varsity golf team. 

Indoor facilities include the Gymnasium and Alumni Field House. 
The basement of the Gymnasium contains dressing rooms, showers, 
lockers, a swimming pool, wrestling room and training room. Through 
the generosity of the Class of 1928 it has been possible to provide addi- 
tional locker and dressing facilities, a new stock room, and a laundry 
and drying room. A regulation basketball court is on the main floor, 
with handball and badminton courts. On the upper floors are department 
offices. 

Alumni Field House, donated by alumni and friends of the College, 
became available in 1957 and provides ideal facihties for the further 
development of the athletic program. This "indoor playing field" includes 
a 7-lap track, with areas for field events, a dirt area 120' by 120' for 
outdoor events under cover, a batting cage for baseball and cricket, nets 
for golf, a wooden area 120^ by 120' with two basketball courts, two 
tennis courts, and seating capacity for 1000 spectators. 

PHYSICS 

Professor Fay Ajzenberg-Selove, Acting Chairman 

Associate Professor William C. Davidon 

Associate Professor Douglas G. Miller 

Assistant Professor Gustav A. SAYERf 

Assistant Professor Walter J. TRELAf 

The physics curriculum acquaints students with the physical world, 
introduces them to the concepts which are now fundamental in science, 
and provides them an opportunity for firsthand experimental investi- 
gations. For the student with professional aims in science, the depart- 
ment offers a program of study which leads to a strong major in physics, 
providing sound preparation for graduate work. 

tAppointed on the Sloan Foundation Grant. 

119 



Whenever possible, students interested in a physics major should take 
physics in their freshman year. If their training in high school has not 
included calculus, Physics 13, 14 (and Math 13, 14) are recommended. 
If their preparation in high school has included a year of calculus, and if 
they are admitted to Mathematics 19, they can, upon consent of the 
instructor, take Physics 19, 20. 

Students intending to major in chemistry, biology and engineering, and 
pre-medical students, are urged to take Physics 13, 14 in their freshman 
or sophomore year since this course serves as a general background for 
many of the other science courses. Physics 27 may also be of interest to 
many students outside of physics. 

Students interested in physics for non-professional reasons should 
consider Physics 17. 

In its program of studies for physics majors, the department desires 
to stimulate a maximum of independent thought and initiative con- 
sistent with a thorough development of understanding. To this end, 
a basic sequence of mechanics, electromagnetism, and atomic and 
nuclear physics is required. Upper level courses encourage a further 
exploration of physics. The senior year features an opportunity for an 
extended research project, with an emphasis on independent work, oral 
and written expression, and the close relation between theory and 
experiment. 

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS 

Physics 19, 20, 25, 26, 100, and six additional courses in physics numbered 
27 or above, including two courses in the 60's; Mathematics 13, 14 (or 19), 
20, 21. 

A student may propose to the Physics Department a major program which 
substitutes upper level courses in other departments for certain of the advanced 
physics courses. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR HONORS 

The granting of honors in physics will be based upon excellence (an average of 
85 or better) in course work, the quality of performance in the senior project 
course and the results of the oral and written comprehensive examinations 
(Physics 100). 

13, 14 PRINCIPLES OF PHYSICS Messrs. Davidon and Sayer 

Four hours, including one laboratory period a week 

Certain fundamental concepts of contemporary physics are presented, with 
particular emphasis on conservation laws and symmetry principles. These 
concepts are used in the analysis of both microscopic and macroscopic 
phenomena. In Physics 13, the focus is on conservation of energy, linear 
momentum, and angular momentum, while in Physics 14, electric charge, 
entropy, and baryon number are considered. Those mathematical concepts 
beyond high school algebra which are necessary for the course will be de- 
veloped as needed. No prerequisites. 

120 



17 ULTIMATE CONSTITUENTS OF MATTER Mr. Miller 

Three hours, no laboratory 

Modern concepts of the atom and its interior will be emphasized. Experi- 
ments are discussed in order to help the student without previous experience 
in physics to expand his observations to the submicroscopic realm and to 
induce intrinsic properties of individual particles. Everyday experiences of 
symmetry are invoked to unify the treatment of physical change and to 
delimit the possible structures of matter. There will be considerable emphasis 
on broad intellectual concepts such as mass-energy equivalence and the 
uncertainty principle. No prerequisites. 

Offered in 1968-69 and 1969-70. 



19, 20 MECHANICS AND ELECTROMAGNETISM 

Physics 19: Mrs. Selove 

Physics 20: Messrs. Sayer, Miller (Fall) 

Messrs. Davidon, Miller (Spring) 

Four hours; Physics 19: three lectures and one recitation (or occasional 

labs); Physics 20: three lectures and one laboratory period each week 

Problems in non-relativistic and relativistic dynamics; conservation of en- 
ergy, and of linear and angular momentum; -orbital motion; scattering prob- 
lems; normal modes; fields due to charges at rest and in uniform motion; 
solutions of boundary value problem; induced fields and Maxwell's equations. 
Prerequisite: Math 19 (or concurrently). 

In 1968-69, Physics 19 will be offered in the Fall Semester and Physics 20 
will be given in both the Fall and Spring Semesters. 



25, 26 WAVE MECHANICS OF ATOMS AND NUCLEI Mrs. Selove 

Four hours; three lectures and one laboratory period 

Electromagnetic radiation; inference of quantum principles from experiment; 
uncertainty principles; algebra of symmetries and conservation laws; energy 
levels of the hydrogen atom; intrinsic spin and the exclusion principle; 
emission and absorption of light; nuclear binding and decay; nuclear models. 
Prerequisites: Physics 19, 20; Math 21 concurrently. 

In 1968-69, Physics 25 will not be offered and Physics 19, 20 will be the 
sole prerequisites for Physics 26, which will be offered in the Spring. 



27 EXPERIMENTAL METHODS IN PHYSICS Mr. Trela 

Three hours, including one laboratory 

Analysis of D.C. and A.C. circuits covering both vacuum tubes and transis- 
tors. Topics include basic amplifier principles, frequency considerations, 
feed back, oscillators, pulse and digital circuits. Optical devices and tech- 
niques including the use of lasers to investigate diffraction, interference and 
coherence. Basic vacuum techniques and principles. Prerequisites: Physics 
13, 14 (or equivalent). 
Offered in 1968-69. 

121 



35 DYNAMICS OF WAVES AND PARTICLES Mr. Davidon 

Three hours 

Analysis of particle motion in conservative force fields and of wave motion 
in non-dissipative media by use of Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formulations 
of mechanics and Maxwell's equations. Liouville's Theorem and the prop- 
erties of phase space. Oscillations, normal modes. Scattering, absorption, 
focusing, and polarization of waves and particles. Prerequisites: Physics 
19, 20. 
Offered in 1968-69 and alternate years. 

41 GENERAL RELATIVITY AND COSMOLOGY Mr. Green 

(See Astronomy 41) 

Offered in 1969-70 and alternate years. 

42 QUANTUM MECHANICS Mr. Miller 
Three hours 

Charge and current conservation, lepton and baryon conservation, discrete 
symmetry operations such as particle exchange, reflection and time reversal, 
decay processes. Prerequisite: Physics 26 (or permission of the instructor). 
Offered in 1968-69 and alternate years. 

43 PARTICLE PHYSICS Mr. Davidon 
Three hours 

Classification of particles, isotopic spin, baryon number, hypercharge and 
SU.3 symmetry. Scattering theory including relativistic kinematics. Produc- 
tion and decay of unstable particles and interactions of particles with mat- 
ter. Prerequisites: Physics 25, 26 (or permission of the instructor). 
Offered in 1969-70 and alternate years. 

44 STATISTICAL AND THERMAL PHYSICS Mr. Trela 
Four hours, including one laboratory period 

Statistical formulation of the description of a system of many particles. 
Basic macroscopic thermodynamic concepts and laws developed and then 
applied to ideal gases, phase transition, magnetic systems, production of 
low temperatures. Methods and results of classical statistical mechanics, 
quantum statistics, elementary kinetic theory, transport processes. Pre- 
requisite: Physics 25. 
Offered in 1969-70 and alternate years. 

45 THE DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS OF ASTRONOMY AND PHYSICS 

(See Astronomy 45) Mr. Green 

Offered in 1969-70 and alternate years. 

46 SOLID STATE PHYSICS Mr. Trela 
Four hours, including one laboratory period 

The properties of crystalline solids are studied. Crystal symmetries, binding 
forces, lattice vibrations, specific heats, free-electron theory of metals, energy 
bands, semi-conductors, magnetisms in solids, superconductivity. Prerequi- 
site: Physics 25. , 
Offered in 1968-69 and alternate years. \ 

122 



61, 62 THEORETICAL PHYSICS Mr. Davidon 



65, 66 HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS Messrs. Sayer and Miller 



§0n leave 1968-69. 

123 



u 





48 MATHEMATICAL PHYSICS Mr. Davidon 

Three hours 

Applications to physics of linear algebra, Fourier analysis, integration in 
the complex plane, differential equations, calculus of variations, and group | 
theory. Prerequisites: Mathematics 20, 21. 
Offered in 1969-70 and alternate years. 



n 

A program of lectures, readings and independent work on current problems ^ 

and methods in theoretical physics. Applications of group theory to the |" 
study of symmetry in physics will be emphasized. 

63, 64 NUCLEAR STRUCTURE PHYSICS Mrs. Selove U* 

Student research in nuclear spectroscopy and related problems. Appropriate \§ 

projects may be carried out at the University of Pennsylvania Tandem " 

Accelerator. Analysis of the results will be carried out using computers. Ill 



Z 

A research seminar on the forces which hold the proton together. Experi- |J 
mental work with the 3 GeV proton accelerator at Princeton will be III 
planned, executed and analyzed. 

67, 68 LOW TEMPERATURE PHYSICS Mr. Trela 

Student research in the area of superconductivity, liquid helium and other 
solid state phenomena. Experiments are performed at temperatures down 
to 1°K. 

100 SENIOR DEPARTMENTAL STUDIES Staff 

A course of informal seminars, readings, and occasional lectures to review 
and interrelate the student work in other physics courses. The examination 
in this course will be in two parts. One part, late in the first semester, will 
test the student's knowledge of the basic ideas of physics. The second part 
of the examination will be given at the end of the spring semester and will 
be based upon the student's advanced work. Seniors should register for 
Physics 100 in both terms. Only one course credit can be earned for the 
course. 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Associate Professor Harvey Glickman, Chairman 

Assistant Professor Robert A. Mortimer 

Assistant Professor Sidney R. Waldman§ 

Assistant Professor Sara M. Shumer 

The political science curriculum is designed to give students an 
understanding of political organization and political forces in modern 
society, to provide knowledge and a basis for insight and judgment 
on the problems involved in the relationship of the individual to 



government and of governments to one another. The broad areas 
of study include: analysis of political theory in relation to its insti- 
tutional environment; comparison and appraisal of different types 
of governments and political organization; American political behavior 
and institutions; and problems of international relations. 

The courses are designed primarily for a liberal arts education and 
are intended to create intelligent and lasting interest and participation 
in the formulation of public policy. The training will also serve the 
needs of men contemplating scholarship and teaching in political science, 
as well as other professional careers, such as law, journalism, and the 
public service. 

In advanced courses, emphasis is placed upon individual research and 
analysis — practice in concept formation, location, organization, and 
presentation of data; and independent judgment. 

Majors in political science are expected to understand the relationship 
of this field to other social studies as well as to the purposes and methods 
of the social sciences as a whole. They are thus expected to take support- 
ing courses in economics, history, sociology, and psychology. 

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS 

Political Science 11, 12, 100, and seven other courses in political science dis- 
tributed among three of the four areas of study: (1) comparative politics; (2) 
American politics; (3) international relations; and (4) political theory and 
political philosophy. 

Four approved semester courses in other social sciences. 

A comprehensive examination covering a major and a minor field chosen from 
the four areas of study indicated above. 

In the senior year majors will enroll in the appropriate Research Seminar (41, 
43, 45, or 47) or Political Science 81 in the first semester and in Political Science 
100 in the second semester. This will cover seminar participation (or independ- 
ent research), preparation of a senior thesis, and review for comprehensive 
examinations. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR HONORS 

Candidates must submit an outstanding thesis of independent research or 
original theoretical analysis and must pass an oral examination on the thesis as 
well as on general attainment in the field. The award of honors will be deter- 
mined on the basis of the thesis, the oral examination, quality of course work, 
and performance in the comprehensive examination. 

II POLITICAL SYSTEMS: NATIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL Staff 
An introductory analysis of forms of government, political institutions, and 
relations among states. The major functional problems of political organiza- 
tion and development are considered in examining the governments of the 
United States, the U.S.S.R., and emergent political systems of Africa. The 
dynamics of the modern nation state system are examined by studying a 
key problem of international politics. 
Open to freshmen and sophomores only. 

124 ' 



II 



12 POLITICAL THEORY: IDEAS AND ISSUES Staff 

An introduction to the analysis of political problems presented with the help 
of original works of theorists who have had a major influence on shaping 
modern ideas and practice. Particular attention is given to the central issue 
of reconciling individual freedom and collective authority. 

Open to freshmen and sophomores only. 

Political Science 11 and 12 together provide the student with a basic under- 
standing of the major elements of the political process; they are prerequisites 
for further work in political science. They should normally be taken in the 
order listed above, although exceptions can be made with the consent of 
the instructor. 

21 AMERICAN POLITICAL PROCESS: PRESIDENT AND CONGRESS 

Mr. Waldman 

A functional and behavioral analysis of the policy-making process. Political 
parties, legislative behavior and powers and the interactions between the 
President and Congress will be examined. Prerequisite: Political Science 11, 
12 or consent of instructor. 

Not offered in 1968-69. 

22 PUBLIC OPINION, PRIVATE INTERESTS, AND THE POLITICAL 
SYSTEM Mr. Waldman 

An in-depth analysis of the formation of political attitudes, the functions of 
public opinion in shaping public policy, and the impact of interest groups 
on that policy. Prerequisite: Political Science 11, 12 or consent of instructor. 
Not offered in 1968-69. 

23 COMPARATIVE POLITICS: WESTERN SYSTEMS Mr. Glickman 
An institutional-functional analysis of government and politics in selected 
states, emphasizing Great Britain and certain Commonwealth countries. Com- 
parisons with several European states. The major categories for study are: 
political culture; the organization, distribution, and manipulation of power; 
the pattern of interest and ideology; political parties. Prerequisite: Political 
Science 11, 12 or consent of the instructor. 

24 COMPARATIVE POLITICS: NON-WESTERN SYSTEMS Mr. Glickman 

A study of political ideologies, systems, and processes in new states, with 
emphasis on sub-Saharan Africa. Problems include the impact of the West 
on traditional societies, the growth and effects of nationalism, moderniza- 
tion, stability and popular government. Prerequisite: Political Science 11, 12 
or consent of the instructor. 

25 INTERNATIONAL POLITICS AND FOREIGN POLICY Mr. Mortimer 
Using United States foreign policy as a case study, the course will deal with 
the factors that influence the foreign policies and the power of states in an 
expanding international system. The problems of managing power and re- 
solving international conflicts without resort to war are considered. Pre- 
requisite: Political Science 11, 12 or consent of the instructor. 

125 



26 INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATION Mr. Mortimer 

A study of various attempts to adapt the practices of international relations 
to the conditions of international interdependence, focusing on the United 
Nations system and regional organizations such as the OAU as one approach 
to the peaceful organization of the international system. The nature and 
capacities of international organizations operating in a system of state 
sovereignty, and other theoretical approaches to the establishment of the 
world order, will be considered. Prerequisite: Political Science 11, 12 or con- 
sent of the instructor. 

27 POLITICAL THEORY: THE CONTEXT OF PUBLIC POLICY 

Miss Shumer 
Public policy is formulated within the limits and potentials established by a 
specific political culture and set of political institutions. This course will 
explore the classical and modern literature on the theoretical assumptions 
and implications of the American political system: theories of constitution- 
alism, mass society, organization and pluralism. Prerequisite: Political Sci- 
ence 11, 12 or consent of the instructor. 

28 PUBLIC POLICY: CIVIL RIGHTS AND POVERTY Miss Shumer 

An historical and analytical inquiry into the scope and nature of the prob- 
lems in the selected policy area of civil rights and poverty; and the sys- 
tematic analysis of the capacity of the present political system (including 
both the government and non-government groups) to deal effectively with 
these problems. Prerequisite: Political Science 11, 12 or consent of the 
instructor. (Political Science 21 and Political Science 27 are recommended.) 

30 THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY PHILOSOPHES Mrs. Ringold 
(See French 24) 

31 POLITICAL ANALYSIS Mr. Waldman 
Inquiry into the scope of political studies and the methods conducive to 
arriving at reliable and verifiable results. The philosophical basis of be- 
havioral political science is examined. Student research projects. Prerequisite: 
Political Science 11, 12 or permission of the instructor. (Majors in natural 
sciences are encouraged to take this course.) 

Not offered in 1968-69. 

32 THE SOVIET SYSTEM Mr. Hunter 
(See Economics 32) 

33 GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS IN EAST ASIA Mr. Kennedy 

An approach to modern Asian politics (prior to 1950) through a study of 
the major philosophic and institutional features of dynastic China and areas 
under Chinese cultural influence. India and Japan are considered for com- 
parative purposes. 

Offered at Bryn Mawr as Political Science 203a. 

126 



35 METROPOLITAN GOVERNMENT Mr. Ross 

Analysis of the forces affecting the structure of metropoHtan regions. The 
functions and politics of American government at the local and metropolitan 
levels. Current administrative and planning practices. Problems of economic 
development, urban renewal, and poverty. Field work in Greater Philadel- 
phia. 

Offered at Bryn Mawr as Political Science 218a. 



36 PROBLEMS OF URBAN POLITICS Mr. Ross 

A research seminar on selected topics in urban politics. 
Offered at Bryn Mawr as Political Science 316b. 



37 INTERNATIONAL LAW Miss Leighton 

An examination of the doctrines and practices of international law. Tradi- 
tional material is considered in the context of the contemporary political 
process, with some emphasis on methodological problems. 

Offered at Bryn Mawr as Political Science 221a. 



41 RESEARCH SEMINAR IN AMERICAN POLITICS Mr. Waldman 

Student research into problems of American political institutions and be- 
havior: voting studies, small group research, legislative behavior. Pre- 
requisite: Political Science 21, 22 or consent of the instructor. 

Not offered in 1968-69. 



42 WEST EUROPEAN INTEGRATION Mr. Frye 

An analysis of postwar moves toward integration in Western Europe, with 
special emphasis upon the factors behind integration and upon the impact 
of integration upon member societies. 
Offered at Bryn Mawr as Political Science 304b. 



43 RESEARCH SEMINAR IN COMPARATIVE POLITICS Mr. Glickman 

Student research into problems of developed and developing political sys- 
tems, emphasizing the use of cross-national and cross-cultural data and 
hypotheses. Prerequisite: Political Science 23, 24 or consent of the instructor. 
Topic for 1968-69: Political Transformation: Evolution and Revolution. 



45 RESEARCH SEMINAR IN INTERNATIONAL POLITICS Mr. Mortimer 

Student research into problems of developed and developing political sys- 
discussion of various methods of research and analysis of the international 
political system. Prerequisite: Political Science 25, 26 or consent of the 
instructor. Topic for 1968-69: The Developing States in International Poli- 
tics. 

127 



47 RESEARCH SEMINAR IN POLITICAL THEORY AND PUBLIC POLICY 

Miss Shumer and Mr. Bernstein 
Student research into some of the major issues of poUtical inquiry, such as 
bureaucratization and mass society, ethics and poHtics, freedom and consent. 
Prerequisite: PoUtical Science 27, 28 or consent of the instructor. Topic for 
1968-69: The Nature of Contemporary Political Theory. 
Taught jointly with Philosophy 53. 

48 CHINA AND JAPAN: PROBLEMS OF MODERNIZATION Mr. Kennedy 
The course focuses on internal responses to the Western impact as revealed 
in changing attitudes, revised values and new institutions; and on external 
policies and relations. Special attention to evidence of continuity and change 
and to comparison of political developments in the two countries. 
Offered at Bryn Mawr as Political Science 312b. 

49 LAW AND SOCIETY Miss Leighton 

An introduction to the nature of legal obligation and its relation to selected 
social institutions. Typical legal problems pertaining to the family, property 
and government are discussed. 
Offered at Bryn Mawr as Political Science 301a. 

81, 82 INDEPENDENT PROJECT COURSES Staff 

Individual consultation; supervised independent reading and research 

Research papers and oral reports on special topics based upon the individual 
interests of advanced students. Enrollment only by permission of the in- 
structor. May be taken as semester or year course by arrangement with the 
instructor. 

100 SENIOR DEPARTMENTAL STUDIES Staff 

Completion of senior essay normally begun as part of the work in the 
research seminars and preparation for comprehensive examination. All staff 
members will be involved in any given year in the supervision of senior 
essays. After completion of the essay on April 15, there will be a period 
of reading and review leading to a written comprehensive examination for 
all senior majors. 



128 



I 



PSYCHOLOGY U 

Associate Professor Sidney I. Perloe, Chairman ffl 

Professor Douglas H. Heath*** ^ 

Assistant Professor Thomas D'Andrea |i^ 

Assistant Professor Preston B. Rowe, Jr. -jj 

Instructor James L. Vaughan X 

The psychology program is designed to give the student an under- U 
standing of the empirical approach to the study of behavior, a knowl- i 
edge of the psychological principles which have emerged from empirical U 
research, and an acquaintance with the problems to which contem- Q 
porary research is directed. The student is encouraged to make active ^ 
use of his knowledge in two ways : first, by developing through laboratory 
courses a working familiarity with the experimental method as applied 
in psychology, ordinarily culminating in an individual research project 
in the junior or senior year; second, by attempting to apply known 
psychological principles to an understanding of the behavior of in- 
dividuals and groups in all areas of human endeavor. 

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS 

A major program in psychology includes Psychology 11, 14, 16, 23, 35, 100, 
and two additional advanced courses in the department. Students may, but are not 
required to, concentrate in any one of the three following areas: experimental 
psychology, personality psychology and social psychology. Students concentrating 
in the first area should strongly consider taking Mathematics 18, Probability and 
Statistics 50a, and Philosophy 50, Modern Analytic Philosophy. Students who 
concentrate in Social Psychology are expected to take Sociology 43, The Sociology 
of Small Groups. Students contemplating a psychology major are advised to com- 
plete at least one or two semester courses beyond the introductory one by the end 
of the sophomore year. Students should note that the Sociology Department also 
offers social psychology as a special area. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR HONORS 

The award of departmental honors signifies that a student has maintained a 
consistently high standard of performance in the work of his major program, and 
has done distinguished work on an independent empirical research project as well 
as on the comprehensive examination. Honors candidates should plan to take 
Psychology 5 1 and 52 during the senior year. 

11 INTRODUCTORY PSYCHOLOGY Staff 

The course will cover the following topics, drawn from the three major 
areas of psychology: conditioning, learning, and the experimental analysis 
of behavior; the development of theories of motivation with emphasis on 
achievement motivation, frustration and aggression; the influence of motiva- 
tion and learning on perception. 

***On sabbatical leave 1968-69. 

129 



14 LEARNING Mr. D' Andrea and Mr. Rowe 

Three lectures and one laboratory period each week 

The course focuses on the theoretical interpretations of learning in humans 
and animals with emphasis on the empirical evidence on learned behavior. 
Topics covered will include classical and instrumental conditioning, memory 
and forgetting, S-R and cognitive models of learning, and learning sets and 
problem-solving. The laboratory will include research in both human and 
animal learning. Prerequisite: Psychology 11. 

16 SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY Mr. Perloe 

(Also called Sociology 16) 

A consideration of the individual aspects of social behavior. Initially atten- 
tion will be focused on some problems in social perception. The following 
topics will then be examined: the motivational determinants of group 
membership and social conformity, the effects of society and personality on 
social attitudes, the psychological aspects of social conflict and the psycho- 
logical aspects of social roles and social systems. Prerequisite: Psychology 
11 or Sociology 11 or permission of the instructor. Juniors and seniors 
electing the course will be expected to do some additional work. 

22 PSYCHOLOGY OF LANGUAGE Mr. D'Andrea 

The course will concentrate on the development of modern psycholinguistics. 
Such topics as semantics, the interpretation of language in terms of associa- 
tion theories, the relation between language and thinking, and the implications 
of recent work in generative grammars for a psychology of language will 
be discussed. Students will have the opportunity to pursue their particular 
interests, whether they be in the philosophical or mathematical theories of 
language, in culture and language, or in more conventional linguistics. 
Prerequisite: Psychology 11 or the consent of the instructor. 

23 THEORIES OF PERSONALITY Mr. Vaughan 

Although the course will cover the major personality theorists, it will go 
most extensively into Freudian and neo-psychoanalytic personality theory. 
Theorists such as Jung, existentialist personality theorists, and the proponents 
of a trait approach to personality will also be discussed. Wherever possible, 
reading will be in original sources. Class discussion and papers will con- 
centrate on clarifying and evaluating the merits of different theories. 
Prerequisite: Psychology 11. 

24 DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY Mr. Heath 

The course will be organized around the major developmental problems of 
childhood, adolescence and the adult, and the types of controls used to 
master these problems. Emphasis will be placed on Piaget's and the ego 
psychologists' theories of child development. Consideration will also be 
given to the psychological aspects of identity, marriage, religion, old age, 
and death. Prerequisite: Psychology 23 and the consent of the instructor. 
Not offered in 1968-69. 

130 



I 



25 ANALYSIS OF BEHAVIOR Mr. D'Andrea 

Three lectures and one laboratory period each week 

The course systematically formulates and analyzes the problems of scientific 
method, learning, motivation, and emotion in terms of the principles of 
operant conditioning. Detailed analysis will be made of such problems as 
primary and conditioned reinforcement, reinforcement schedules, and avoid- 
ance conditioning. Lectures will emphasize the systematic principles and 
their application to a variety of human behaviors. The laboratory will involve 
the study of an individual animal's behavior (e.g., acquisition, extinction, 
discrimination). Students will also do an independent research project. 
Prerequisite: Psychology 11 or the consent of the instructor. 



PHYSIOLOGICAL PSYCHOLOGY Mr. Thomas 

Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory each week 

The physiological and anatomical bases of behavior. Prerequisite: Psychology 

14. 

Offered at Bryn Mawr as Psychology 301b. 



ANIMAL LEARNING Mr. Bitterman 

Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory each week 

Comparative studies of conditioning and selective learning; theories of learn- 
ing; the evolution of intelligence. Prerequisite: Psychology 14. 

Offered at Bryn Mawr as Psychology 201a. 



29 CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM AND BEHAVIOR Mr. Thomas 

Three hours of lecture and one laboratory period each week 

The neural basis of a wide range of psychological phenomena including: 
learning, emotion, motivation and thought. 

Offered at Bryn Mawr as Psychology 301a. 



30 HUMAN LEARNING AND THINKING Mr. Gonzalez 

Two hours of lecture and four hours of laboratory each week 

Verbal learning and retention; meaning and creative thought. Prerequisite: 
Psychology 14; Psychology 27 recommended. 

Offered at Bryn Mawr as Psychology 203b. 



31 PERCEPTION Mr. R. Davidon 

Three hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory each week 
Differentiation and organization of the perceived environment, visual, audi- 
tory and tactual-kinesthetic. Prerequisite: Psychology 11. 

Offered at Bryn Mawr as Psychology 305a. 

131 



34 ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY Mr. Vaughan 

Three hours of class and field work each week 

The seminar will introduce the student to the inner world and dynamics of 
schizophrenia from detailed case studies and reading in both the theoretical 
and research literature. Following a survey of other behavior disorders likely 
to be encountered in the field work, the seminar will examine the theoretical 
and methodological issues involved in personality assessment and therapy. 
The field work offers closely supervised experience in observational pro- 
cedures, participation in the various services of a research mental hospital, 
and discussion with the professional staff following demonstrations of 
personality assessment methods, and therapeutic interviews. Prerequisite: 
Psychology 23 and the consent of the instructor. 



35 HUMAN INFORMATION PROCESSING Mr. Rowe 

Three hours of seminar and one laboratory period each week 

Seminar discussion will center upon the experimental investigation of human 
information processing. A variety of experimental approaches to the study 
of structure and dynamics in cognitive processes will be reviewed critically. 
The following are some of the topics to be covered : the stabilization of one's 
perceptual-cognitive world, the codification and classification of information, 
and reasoning and judgment in problem solving. An experimental term proj- 
ect will be required. Prerequisite: Psychology 11 or consent of the instructor. 



37 COMMUNICATION, PROPAGANDA, AND ATTITUDE CHANGE 

(Also called Sociology 37) Mr. Perloe 

A detailed coverage of recent psychological research and theory on per- 
suasive communications and attitude change. Consideration will be given to 
the effects of the following factors: the nature of the communicator, the 
use of emotional appeals, the structure of persuasive communications, the 
personalities of the communication recipients and the occurrence of incon- 
sistencies between belief and action. The consequences of gross situational 
changes such as "brain washing" will be discussed. The last part of the 
course will be organized as a seminar devoted to individual research projects. 
Prerequisite: Psychology 12 or the permission of the instructor. 



40 DESIGN, ANALYSIS AND THEORY IN BEHAVIORAL RESEARCH 

Mr. Rowe 

A consideration of strategies, problems and philosophical questions relevant 
to the conduct of behavioral research. Some frequently used statistical 
methods will be covered in detail along with a nontechnical treatment of 
the nature of statistical reasoning. Students will be expected to acquire some 
familiarity with computer programming while taking the course. Prerequisite: 
permission of the instructor or one laboratory course in psychology; the 
latter may be taken concurrently. 

132 







51, 52 RESEARCH TOPICS IN PSYCHOLOGY Staff Jl 

This course will introduce students to the problems of hypothesis formation mi 
and definition, experimental design, data analysis, and report writing by •^j* 
means of seminars, closely supervised experimental research projects, and T 
oral reports. Students must have selected the general topical area within 
which they wish to do research prior to admission to the course. Prerequisite: 
Psychology 14, 35 and 40, and the consent of the instructor; students with 
preparation in statistics will be excused from the Psychology 40 prerequisite. 

81, 82 READING PROIECTS IN PSYCHOLOGY Staff 

100 SENIOR DEPARTMENTAL STUDIES Staff 

The course will meet as a seminar to consider significant issues in psycho- 
logical theory and methods, the relations between psychology and other 
disciplines, the value implications of psychological knowledge and the role 
of psychology in the solution of social problems. The specific topics dis- 
cussed will depend in part upon the interests of the students. Several papers 
and a final exam will be required. 



RELIGION 

Associate Professor Gerhard E. Spiegler, Chairman 

Assistant Professor C. Peter Slater 

Assistant Professor J. Bruce Long 

Visiting Lecturer Samuel Lacks t 

The Department of Religion is concerned with (1) the historical 
study of religious traditions in the Hebrew-Christian culture; (2) the 
historical-phenomenological study of non-Western religious traditions; 
and (3) the philosophical study of religious thought, East and West, 
particularly its modern forms of expression. 



MAJOR REQUIREMENTS 

The exact structure of the program must be determined in consultation with 
the major supervisor. The program must include the following courses: 

a. Religion 15, 16 

b. Four additional half-year courses in religion. 

c. Three half-year courses beyond the introductory level in some other depart- 
ment to be approved as related courses by the major supervisor. 

d. Such additional language courses as deemed essential by the department for 
the proposed course of study. 

A comprehensive examination consisting of three parts: 

(a) passing of Religion 100; (b) a senior research paper; (c) an oral ex- 
amination on the paper but not necessarily restricted to it. 

133 



REQUIREMENTS FOR HONORS 

Honors in religion are awarded for a prearranged special study of the works 
of some major theologian or work on a major theological problem. The usual 
method for testing such study is by a three-hour written examination. Honors 
will not be given unless the candidate receives a grade of 85 or better in the 
regular comprehensive examination in religion, and high honors require a mini- 
mum grade of 90. 

15, 16 RELIGION AND CULTURE Staff 

A study of man's pre-philosophical, religious conceptions of himself and 
society through a detailed examination of selected myths and rites, found 
in the traditions of tribal Africa, Vedic India, and the Ancient Near East. 
An introduction to and testing of divergent methodologies and theories of 
religion in the study of major religious forms and types developed in the 
Hebrew-Christian tradition. In the second semester modern forms of religious 
expressions and critiques of religion will be studied in the work of such 
men as Kierkegaard, Marx, Freud, T. S. Eliot, Buber, Reinhold Niebuhr, 
Camus, Tillich, Bultmann and Gandhi. Religion 16 may be taken without 
prerequisite. 

21 THE RELIGION OF ISRAEL Mr. Kee 

The development of Israelite religion in the religious and cultural setting 

of the ancient Near East; the rise of Judaism in the Persian and Hellenistic 

periods. 

Offered at Bryn Mawr as History of Religion 201a. 

22 THE BEGINNING OF CHRISTIANITY Mr. Kee 
Offered at Bryn Mawr as History of Religion 201b. 

23-24 MEDIEVAL EUROPEAN CIVILIZATION 

(Also called History 23-24) 
Not offered in 1968-69. 

25, 26 RELIGIOUS TRADITIONS IN INDIA AND EAST ASIA Mr. Long 

(Also called Philosophy 25, 26) 

First semester, the rise and spread of Hinduism and Buddhism in India. 
Second semester, the spread of Buddhism to China and Japan, its meeting 
with their Taoist and Confucian traditions, and the rise and spread of Islam. 
Throughout the course textual study will be interspersed with interpretive 
materials from the phenomenology of religion. Prerequisite: Religion 15 or 
consent of the instructor. 

29b RELIGIOUS IDEAS IN MODERN CULTURE Mr. Long 

(Also called Philosophy 29b) 

A study of some theological and philosophical problems and issues in con- 
temporary literature. Special attention is given to theistic and nontheistic 
existentialism, theological naturalism and confessional theology. The work 
of such men as Kafka, Camus, Buber, Heidegger, Barth and Tillich will be 
examined respectively. First-hand acquaintance with selected writings of four 
of these men; reports, lectures, and class discussions. 



tOn appointment first semester 1968-69. 

134 



36 THE PROTESTANT REFORMATION Staff 

(Also called History 36) 

A study of the rise and development of the Protestant Reformation during 
the sixteenth century, its history and thought, with special attention to the 
work and thought of Luther and Calvin. Prerequisite: Religion 23-24 or 
consent of the instructor. 
Offered in 1968-69 and alternate years. 



37 RELIGIOUS ETHICS Mr. Slater 

(Also called Philosophy 37) 

An examination of Western and non-Western approaches to such topics as 
freedom and order, love and justice, vocation and avocation, church and 
state, just war theory and non-violent resistance, population control and 
personal responsibility in the uses of power. Reports, lectures and discussions 
with visiting specialists. Prerequisite: Religion 16 or consent of instructor. 
Enrollment limited. 



38 PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION Mr. Slater 

(Also called Philosophy 38) 

A study of classical and contemporary treatments of such topics as faith and 
knowledge, theology and history, science and religion, the nature and exist- 
ence of God, evil and life after death, and problems to do with truth-claims 
and meaningfulness in religious discourse. Lectures, reports, and class dis- 
cussions. Prerequisite: Religion 16 or one course in Philosophy. 



40 HISTORY AND PRINCIPLES OF QUAKERISM Mr. Bronner 

(See History 40) 



41 ANTHROPOLOGY OF RELIGION Mr. MacGaffey 

(See Sociology 41) 



42 SEMINAR IN MODERN PHILOSOPHICAL RELIGIOUS THOUGHT 

(Also called Philosophy 42) Mr. Spiegler 

Specialized study of the works of some major philosopher and theologian 
or work on a major theological problem. May be repeated for credit with 
change of content. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. 



43 SEMINAR IN HISTORY OF RELIGIONS Mr. Lachs 

Intensive study of some period or set of problems in the field. May be 
repeated for credit with change of content. Prerequisite: Religion 25, 26 or 
consent of the instructor. Topic for 1968-69: Judaism. 

135 



45b SEMINAR IN THE HISTORY OF WESTERN RELIGIOUS THOUGHT 

(Also called History 45b) Mr. Slater 

Intensive study of a major thinker or movement in the history of Christianity. 
May be repeated for credit with change of content. Prerequisite: consent 
of the instructor. Topic for 1968-69: conceptions of philosophy and religion 
in classical and early modern times. (Given in conjunction with the visit of 
Professor Henry Chadwick of Oxford University. ) 

46 SOCIOLOGY OF RELIGION Mrs. Porter 

(See Sociology 46) 

Offered at Bryn Mawr College as Sociology 209b. 

81, 82 PROJECT COURSES Staff 

Individual consultation; independent reading and research. 

100 SENIOR DEPARTMENTAL STUDIES Staff 

A staff seminar for departmental majors and other interested upperclassmen 
focusing on current issues and problems in religious studies. The course 
will be spaced out through an entire year, with papers, discussions and 
examinations. 



136 



B 



ROMANCE LANGUAGES 

Professor Marcel M. Gutwirth, Chairman U 

Professor Manuel J. Asensio 

Associate Professor Bradford Cook 

Assistant Professor Richard R. Raskin 

Instructor Jeannette Ringold 

Instructor Therese C. Rawson 





m 



> 

2 

n 
m 

Admission of new students to all French and Spanish courses except |" 
French 11-12 and Spanish 1 1-12 is contingent upon placement examina- ^ 
tions administered by the department prior to the opening of such "^ 
courses. ^ 

Opportunity is given to students who complete French 11-12, Spanish UJ 
11-12 or Spanish 13-14 with distinction to advance rapidly into higher C 
courses by passing a special examination in September on a prescribed ^ 
program of vacation study. 

Residence in the French and Spanish Houses and participation in 
the Cercle Frangais and Club Espaiiol afford an opportunity for sup- 
plementary oral practice. Ol 

Students who might profitably spend their junior year in France or 
Spain are encouraged by the department to apply for admission to the 
institutions sponsoring foreign study groups. 

Students majoring in a Romance language are encouraged to spend a 
summer in France or in a Spanish-speaking country. Foreign summer 
schools and projects sponsored by the American Friends Service Com- 
mittee and other organizations offer exceptional opportunities in this 
regard. 

FRENCH 

The program in French is designed to give the student some facility 
in handling the French language, by elucidation and review of funda- 
mentals, by a progressive course of reading, constant practice in hearing, 
speaking, writing French. Through the masterpieces of French liter- 
ature, which he is then ready to approach, by close study of style and 
structure, of moral and artistic intentions he is led to enlarge his under- 
standing of the human heart — as well as of the mind — and to heighten 
his perception of artistic achievement. A reading in the original of the 
works of major figures like Pascal, Moliere, Balzac, Flaubert, Proust, 
moreover, will perfect his acquaintance with some of the best in his own 
heritage, the culture of the West. 

137 



MAJOR REQUIREMENTS 

French 31, 32, 33, 34, 41, 42, and 100. 

Supporting courses to be arranged in individual conference with the major 
supervisor. 

Comprehensive examination. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR HONORS 

Honors in French will be awarded on the basis of consistently distinguished 
work in the literature courses — including at least one project course — and of 
a grade of 90 or better on the comprehensive examinations. High honors will 
be determined by a further oral examination. 



11-12 INTRODUCTION TO FRENCH LANGUAGE AND THOUGHT 

Staff 
Pronunciation and intonation; grammar, with oral and written exercises. 
Reading, in the second semester, of easy texts of literary merit. 
This course is not open to freshmen who have had more than two years 
of high school French. 



13-14 INTERMEDIATE FRENCH Staff 

Training in the language is pursued on the basis of a wide sampling of 
literary works designed to acquaint the student with the range of French 
literature, from the Chanson de Roland to the present. Grammar review, 
die tees, short written compositions, classes conducted in French. Prerequisite: 
French 11-12 or satisfactory performance on a placement test. 



21 DICTION AND COMPOSITION IN FRENCH Mrs. Ringold 

Intensive language work in a small class. Grammar review, compositions, 
pronunciation drill, oral reports. The work will be centered on literary 
topics (e.g., the contemporary theatre), but the emphasis will be on perfect- 
ing linguistic performance. Prerequisite: permission of the department. 



22 EXPLICATION DE TEXTES Mr. Raskin 

An introduction to the study of French literature by the method of intensive 
analysis of style and structure applied to the several genres. Prose and poetry, 
essay and fiction drawn from a variety of periods will come under scrutiny. 
Prerequisite: French 21 or the equivalent. 



31 THE CLASSICAL AGE 

Readings in the French 17th century, from Pascal's Pensees to La Bruyere's 
Caracteres, with special attention to the flowering of the classical drama. 
Prerequisite: French 22 or the equivalent. 

Offered in 1969-70 and alternate years. 

138 



32 THE TWENTIETH CENTURY 

Three generations, those of Gide, Malraux, and Sartre, will be examined 
in representative novels, plays, essays, and poems. Prerequisite: French 22 
or the equivalent. 

Offered in 1969-70 and alternate years. 

33 NINETEENTH CENTURY LYRIC POETRY Mr. Cook 
The lyrical rebirth of the 19th century: Vigny, Baudelaire, Rimbaud, 
Mallarme. Prerequisite: French 22 or the equivalent. 

Offered in 1968-69 and alternate years. 

34 THE NOVEL FROM LACLOS TO PROUST Mr. Raskin 

The rise of the modern novel in France from the late 18th to the early 20th 
century with particular attention to Balzac, Stendhal, Flaubert, Zola, and 
Proust. Prerequisite: French 22 or the equivalent. 
Offered in 1968-69 and alternate years. 

41 ADVANCED TOPICS IN FRENCH LITERATURE Mr. Raskin 

1968-69: Rabelais 

In this seminar, we will attempt to follow the advice Rabelais offers in his 
prologue to Gargantiia: we will try to break the bone of his symbols and 
suck out the "substantific marrow." We will take Rabelais at his word when 
he promises that this marrow will reveal "horrific mysteries concerning our 
religion as well as the political state and economic life." Prerequisite: 
consent of the instructor. 

42 ADVANCED TOPICS IN FRENCH LITERATURE Mr. Cook 

1968-69: Proust 

Le Cote de Guermantes, Sodome et Gomorrhe, La Prisonniere, Le Temps 
retrouve. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. 

81, 82 SPECIAL PROJECTS IN FRENCH LITERATURE Staff 

This course offers the student of French literature an opportunity to probe 
more deeply and more independently into a problem or into an area in 
which he is particularly interested. The nature of the course will therefore 
vary to suit the needs of the individual student. 

100 SENIOR DEPARTMENTAL STUDIES Staff 

Masterworks from the Renaissance to the present. 

A representative sample of major works by twelve writers of the first rank 
is assigned in this course, together with a recent scholarly appraisal of each 
writer, to allow the student to form a view of the high points of the literary 
tradition against a background of authoritative, up-to-date assessment. From 
Montaigne to Proust the readings cover a span of four centuries, and they 
range from Voltairian polemic wit to Baudelaire's aesthetic detachment. The 
object of the course is to cap the student's acquaintance with French litera- 
ture by a reconsideration of some of its main achievements. Among the 
writers presented are: Pascal, Moliere, Racine, Flaubert, Gide. Prerequisite: 
senior standing, or permission of the department. 

139 



FRENCH CIVILIZATION 

23 THE IMPRESSIONIST ERA Mr. Raskin 

(Also called History 27) 

A study of mid- 19th century Frencli civilization centering on the relation 
of the arts (music, painting, poetry, and the novel) to the social and political 
scene constituted by the Third Republic. Guest lectures by music and art 
specialists, as well as slides and records. Enrollment limited. A knowledge of 
French is not required. 

24 THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY PHILOSOPHES Mrs. Ringold 
(Also called Political Science 30) 

Montesquieu, Voltaire, Rousseau, Diderot. Readings in English from the 
works of these four major figures of the European Enlightenment, whose 
contribution to sociology, political theory, and theory of education singularly 
broadened the idea of the writer's function in society. Some attention wUl 
also be given to Helvetius, Condillac, and the Encyclopedie. 

COURSES OFFERED AT BRYN MAWR 

305a BAUDELAIRE Miss Jones 

305b CAMUS-MALRAUX Mr. Maurin 

SPANISH 

The courses offered in Spanish are designed to give the students a 
thorough knowledge of the Spanish language and an understanding of 
Spanish and Spanish-American thought and culture. Elementary Spanish 
and Intermediate Spanish are primarily language courses, with emphasis 
on grammar, reading, and conversation. Even in these elementary courses 
the approach corresponds to the liberal tradition of the College, placing 
emphasis on the human value of the language, and its importance in 
international and continental solidarity and understanding. The elemen- 
tary courses are followed by general courses in civilization and literature, 
as the basis for the more advanced courses covering special periods, 
works, and authors in Spanish and Spanish-American literatures. In- 
terested students should consider, in addition to the courses listed below, 
the offerings in Spanish at Bryn Mawr College. 

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS 

Spanish 21-22; 23-24, 33, 81 or 82, and 100. 

History of Spain and Spanish America, as a background for literature. 

Supporting courses to be arranged in individual conference with the major 
supervisor. 

Comprehensive examination. 

Spanish majors are advised^ to take Spanish 202 (Spanish readings and com- 
position) at Bryn Mawr College. 

140 



REQUIREMENTS FOR HONORS 

Honors in Spanish are awarded to students who consistently show high quaUty 
work in their literature courses and undertake study beyond the normal require- 
ments. Every honors student must complete at least one project course. A 
minimum grade of 88 is required in the comprehensive examinations. High honors 
are awarded on the basis of a further oral examination. 



11-12 ELEMENTARY SPANISH Mr. Asensio 

Grammar, with written and oral exercises; reading; thorough drill in con- 
versation. 

13-14 INTERMEDIATE SPANISH Mr. Asensio 

Review of grammar, with written and oral exercises; composition, reading 
and conversation. Prerequisite: Spanish 11-12 or the equivalent. 

21-22 INTRODUCTION TO SPANISH LITERATURE Mr. Asensio 

A survey of Spanish literature from the beginnings to modern times; lectures, 
written and oral reports. Prerequisite: Spanish 13-14 or the equivalent. 
Not offered in 1968-69. 

23-24 INTRODUCTION TO LATIN- AMERICAN LITERATURE 

Mr. Asensio 
A survey of Latin-American literature from the Colonial period to modern 
times; lectures, written and oral reports. Prerequisite: Spanish 13-14 or the 
equivalent. 

25-26 INTRODUCTION TO HISPANIC CIVILIZATION Mr. Asensio 

Geographic, cultural, and historical background. Emphasis is laid on basic 
attitudes underlying the Spanish and Spanish-American culture pattern and 
contrasting with characteristic American attitudes. Lectures, reading, discus- 
sion, written reports. Prerequisite: Spanish 13-14 or the equivalent. 
Not offered in 1968-69. 

33 THE AGE OF CERVANTES Mr. Asensio 

The development of Cervantes' art in the drama, the short story, and the 
novel, with special attention to Don Quixote. 

81, 82 SPECIAL TOPICS IN SPANISH LITERATURE Mr. Asensio 

Reading and lectures; written and oral reports. This course may be repeated, 
with change of content for full credit. 

100 SENIOR DEPARTMENTAL STUDIES Staff 

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RUSSIAN J] 

Professor Frances de Graaff, Chairman f" 

Assistant Professor Ruth C. Pearce* HI 

Part-time Instructor Frederick Schulze* rn 

The courses in Russian are designed to offer the students the op- w 
portunity to learn to read and speak Russian and to achieve an under- ^ 
standing of the thought and culture of pre-revolutionary as well as b 
contemporary Russia. Russian 11-12 and 21-22 are primarily language 
courses. The elementary course teaches the basic grammar and enough 
vocabulary to enable the student to speak and understand simple Russian. 
The intermediate course introduces the student to the Russian literary 
language; also some newspaper articles and other contemporary material 
are read. 

Students who have completed Russian 21-22 can continue with the 
more advanced courses offered at Bryn Mawr College. 

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS 

(Courses numbered above 100 are offered at Bryn Mawr College.) 

Students majoring in this field will be required to take: 

Eight semester courses in Russian language and literature: 11-12, 21-22, 201, 
a 300 course chosen from 301, 302, 303, 304, in addition to the 100 course. 

Three semester courses in Russian history and institutions: History 43-44 (His- 
tory of Russia); Political Science 32 (The Soviet System). 

Other related courses, including Russian 200 (Advanced Training in the 
Russian Language), and Russian 203 (Russian Literature in Translation), are 
recommended. 

A comprehensive examination of the Russian language, a special period of 
Russian literature, and Russian history. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR HONORS 

Honors in Russian will be awarded on the basis of consistently high quality 
work in literature, and a research paper. High honors will be awarded on the 
basis of further oral examination. 

11-12 ELEMENTARY RUSSIAN Mrs. Pearce and Mr. Schulze 

Five periods a week 

Russian grammar, conversation, and reading. This course meets five times a 
week with corresponding reduction in outside preparation; three hours credit. 

21-22 INTERMEDIATE RUSSIAN Mrs. Pearce 

Four periods a week 

Grammar review, reading in Russian classics and contemporary materials, 
conversation. Prerequisite: a grade of 70 or higher in Russian 12, or the 
equivalent. 



*0n appointment at Bryn Mawr College. 

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SOCIOLOGY AND ANTHROPOLOGY ||) 

Professor A. Paul Hare, Chairman Q 

Visiting Professor Edward BAXsoNf Q 

Assistant Professor Wyatt MacGaffey S 



r 

SOCIOLOGY AT BRYN MAWR Q 

Professor Eugene V. Schneider, Chairman (j) 

Assistant Professor Judith R. Porter '^ 

The curriculum in sociology and anthropology is designed to develop 
the student's understanding of social structure, process, and change in 
human societies. The subject matter deals with man, his groups, his 
organizations and his communities. 

In the introductory course and in the advanced theory course there 
is an opportunity to become familiar with past and present theories of 
social behavior. A further understanding of these concepts can be gained 
through field experience and by the analysis of concrete cases of inter- 
personal behavior, organizations, social change, etc. An opportunity to 
apply and to test these theories is provided in the laboratory courses and 
research seminars. 

A student who wishes a general knowledge of sociology and anthro- 
pology can supplement the basic required courses with any of the courses 
listed below. However, it is also possible to specialize in social psychol- 
ogy, institutional analysis, or anthropology by taking a majority of the 
courses listed in one of the following sequences: 

Social psychology— 16, 22, 23, 37, 43, 44, 62. 

Institutional analysis — 14, 20, 21, 25, 26, 30, 46, 63. 

Anthropology — 12, 34, 39, 41, 61 as well as Biology 36, Philosophy 39, and 
Psychology 22. 

The attention of students interested in anthropology is drawn to the depart- 
mental offerings at Bryn Mawr, Swarthmore, and Penn. 



MAJOR REQUIREMENTS AT HAVERFORD 

A major program in sociology and anthropology at Haverford includes courses 
11, 31, or 34, 33, 100 and four additional courses in sociology or anthropology. 

A comprehensive examination designed to test the student's knowledge as well 
as his ability to utilize and integrate the subject matter of the behavioral sciences 
required in the senior year. 



tOn appointment first semester, 1968-69. 

145 



REQUIREMENTS FOR HONORS 

Candidates for final honors in sociology and anthropology will be required to 
demonstrate high competence and seriousness of purpose in their major courses, 
to complete one research paper, and to pass the comprehensive examination 
with distinction. 

11 SOCIETY AND THE INDIVIDUAL Messrs. Hare and MacGaffey 

An introductory examination of the nature and significance of group struc- 
ture and process, highlighting the principal alternative interpretations (e.g., 
those of Marx, Freud, and Weber) of the bases of social order and effective- 
ness. The course will focus on classic and contemporary anthropological 
and sociological concepts and theories useful in the analysis of several con- 
temporary social problems, including mental illness, ethnic relations, political 
extremism, and social change. Field work in a mental hospital or settlement 
house will be undertaken. 

12 AFRICAN SOCIETY Mr. MacGaflfey 

An introduction to social anthropology through the study of Subsaharan 
African peoples. Special attention to kinship and economic institutions, 
relating patterns of exchange to social structure. 

14 AMERICAN SOCIAL STRUCTURE Mr. Schneider 

Analysis of the structure and dynamics of complex, industrial societies. 
Examples are drawn from several societies, but major emphasis is on the 
United States. 

Offered at Bryn Mawr as Sociology 102b. 

16 SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY Mr. Perloe 

(See Psychology 16) 

18 PERSONALITY AND SOCIAL STRUCTURE Mr. Schneider 

An analysis of the relationships between personality, both deviant and non- 
deviant, and major elements of the social structure and culture. Several 
theories linking personality, social structure, and culture will be considered. 

Offered at Bryn Mawr as Sociology 208b. 

20 SOCIOLOGY OF POVERTY Mrs. Porter 

An analysis of the causes and effects of poverty in the U.S. Issues covered 
will include the culture of poverty, the effects of poverty on institutions like 
the family, and the government poverty program. Prerequisite: introductory 
sociology at Haverford or Bryn Mawr. 

Offered at Bryn Mawr as Sociology 212b. 

21 RACE RELATIONS Mrs. Porter 

An examination of theories of prejudice and attitude change. The structure 
of the minority community and its relationship to the majority group will be 
discussed, with major emphasis placed on analysis of Negro-white relations 
in the United States. Prerequisite: Sociology 11. 
Offered at Bryn Mawr as Sociology 207a. 

146 



22 ANALYSIS OF INTERPERSONAL BEHAVIOR Mr. Hare 

The aim of the course is to improve the student's abilities to observe, 
analyze, and understand his own behavior and that of others in everyday 
interpersonal situations. The class constitutes a self-analytic training group 
in which the student is expected to demonstrate his abilities by effective par- 
ticipation in his group as well as in periodic written analysis. Problems for 
analysis are drawn from events in the group and from written cases. 

23 SOCIAL DISORGANIZATION AND DEVIANT BEHAVIOR Mr. Batson 

An analysis of the theories and problems of social disorganization and 
deviant behavior of individuals and groups. Field trips to mental hospitals 
and prisons. 

24 SEMINAR IN CONTEMPORARY SOCIAL AND POLITICAL ISSUES 
(See General Courses, Social Science 24) Mr. Wehr 

25 SOCIAL CONFLICT AND NONVIOLENT RESOLUTION Mr. Wehr 
(See General Courses, Social Science 25) 

26 ORGANIZATIONAL ANALYSIS 

An analysis of the operation and evolution of large-scale organizations, 
especially mental hospitals, schools, political parties, and business firms. The 
course will examine, in cross-cultural perspective, the sources and conse- 
quences of various types of authority and communications systems, goals, 
sanctions, competition, and innovation. The focus will be on problems of 
effectiveness, bureaucratization, and the relations among personality, organi- 
zational structure, and social context. A field study of a "live" organization 
will be undertaken. 

Not offered in 1968-69. 

27 AFRICAN SOCIAL STRATIFICATION Mr. Batson 

Findings, methods, and implications of stratification studies in East and 
Southern Africa. Topics will include concepts, units, biological and socio- 
cultural bases, and functions of stratification. Illustrations will be drawn 
mainly from field research in Zanzibar, Rhodesia, Lesotho, and the Republic 
of South Africa. 

30 SOCIAL STRATIFICATION Mrs. Porter 

Examination of theoretical and methodological problems in the field of social 
stratification, with special reference to the relationship between the class 
structure and the culture and personality systems. The connection between 
the stratification system and other social institutions, the possibility of class 
differences in value systems, and the effect of social class membership on 
socialization and personality development will be among issues considered. 

Not offered in 1968-69. 

Offered at Bryn Mawr as Sociology 205b. 

147 



31 SOCIAL RESEARCH AND ANALYSIS Mr. Hare 

Selection, design, and execution of a study on a contemporary social prob- 
lem with a view toward understanding methods of data gathering and 
analysis in sociological research. Topics will include the relation between 
theory and methodology, selection of problems and hypotheses, research 
strategies, theory of measurement, questionnaire construction, interviewing, 
elementary social statistics, and models of explanation. 

32 DATA PROCESSING AND COMPUTER TECHNIQUES Staff 

An advanced course in sociological research methods with emphasis on 
computer processing of survey data. Students learn to write programs in the 
FORTRAN computer language and to use basic computer programs for 
statistical analysis. 

33 SOCIAL THEORY Mr. Schneider 
Analysis of the theoretical work of several classical and modern thinkers. 
Offered at Bryn Mawr as Sociology 302a. 

34 ANTHROPOLOGICAL RESEARCH METHODS Mr. MacGaffey 

Historical development of research methods in anthropology. Theory of 
corporate groups. Practical problems in field research and epistemology. 

37 COMMUNICATION, PROPAGANDA, AND ATTITUDE CHANGE 

(See Psychology 37) Mr. Perloe 

39 SOCIAL CHANGE IN DEVELOPING AREAS Staff 

An examination of the impact of the drive toward modernization upon tradi- 
tional social structures. Of special concern will be problems involved in the 
development of local social, political and economic institutions capable of 
defining and responding to the material and social needs of rural populations 
in the United States and other countries. Case materials will be drawn from 
studies in the PhiUppines and Africa. 

41 ANTHROPOLOGY OF RELIGION Mr. MacGaffey 

Contemporary ethnographic work in the field of religion considered in 
relation to the most important theoretical contributions, particularly those 
of French authors. A knowledge of French is helpful but not essential. 

43 SOCIOLOGY OF SMALL GROUPS Mr. Hare 

Theoretical and experimental analysis of the structure and process of inter- 
action in small discussion, therapy, or work groups. The effects of variables 
such as leadership, group size, members' personalities, and the communica- 
tion network will be examined. Class members will conduct and observe 
experimental groups in the laboratory and use the computer to simulate 
observed interpersonal behavior. 

148 



44 THE DRAMATURGICAL APPROACH TO SOCIAL INTERACTION 

An extension of dramaturgical theory to the analysis of interpersonal be- 
havior and mass communication. The course will examine, in cross-cultural 
perspective, such topics as styles of presentation of self in everyday life, 
role playing and rehearsal, the dialectic of role development, sources and 
consequences of societal heroes, villains, and fools, the dramatic structure of 
social encounters, and the significance of comedy and tragedy. 
Not offered in 1968-69. 



46 SOCIOLOGY OF RELIGION Mrs. Porter 

Analysis of the interrelationship between religion and society, drawing upon 
the works of major social theorists. Emphasis will be placed on the connec- 
tion between religious systems and secular culture and social structure. 
Among topics considered will be the role of religion in social change, the 
connection between religious and secular values, and the relation between 
religion and the personality system. Prerequisite: Sociology 11. 

Not offered in 1968-69. 

Offered at Bryn Mawr as Sociology 209b. 



50 SEMINAR IN CONTEMPORARY SOCIAL AND POLITICAL ISSUES 

Mr. Wehr 
Interested students together with a faculty member will select the topic for 
study in advance of the term and will design the approach, develop a 
bibliography, and suggest relevant resource persons. The criteria for selection 
of topics will be student and faculty interest and relevance to the current 
social-political scene. Options might range from an examination of the 
imperatives for structural change in American social and political institu- 
tions to an exploration of definition of self in a world of violence. Enroll- 
ment limited. Prerequisite: permission of instructor and a social science 
course above the introductory level. 



61 SEMINAR IN POLITICAL ANTHROPOLOGY Mr. MacGaffey 

Selected topics in the comparative study of government and law, including 
insurrectionary phenomena such as revolution, rebellion, and messianism. 



62 RESEARCH SEMINAR ON SOCIAL INTERACTION 

Participation in designing and conducting research on social interaction 
either in the laboratory or in a natural setting. 



63 RESEARCH SEMINAR ON URBAN PROBLEMS Staff 

Field research in surrounding communities on problems of poverty and 
racial tensions, political pressure groups, and related aspects of the urban 
setting. 

149 



81, 82 PROJECT AND READING COURSES Staff 

Research papers and reading courses on special topics based upon the indi- 
vidual interests of advanced students. Prerequisite: approval of a research or 
reading proposal by the department. 

100 SENIOR DEPARTMENTAL STUDIES Staff 

Collaboration with staff in designing a course in the social sciences at the 
high school level and teaching a tutorial group. Seminar discussions of teach- 
ing experiences and problems in the sociology of education. Required of 
majors and open to others with the permission of the instructors. 



SPANISH 

(See Romance Languages) 



150 



ARTS AND SERVICE PROGRAM 



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The faculty of Haverford College adopted in the spring of 1947 a 
program designed to cultivate aesthetic perception, creative control of 
materials, a love of fine workmanship, and other important areas of w 
learning and of experience, such as community service, which have ^ 
usually been omitted from the liberal arts program. The faculty feels b 
that, though courses in these areas cannot properly be included in the Q 
academic curriculum, they are of no less importance in the develop- 
ment of personality than strictly intellectual work. Hi 

Every student is required to take eight terms (a "term" in this sense IH 
being approximately nine weeks in either the autumn, winter, or spring) jQI 
of work which is not academic in nature. It is mandatory that five of ^ 
these terms be taken in physical education. Freshmen must take non- — i 
academic work all three terms and must take physical education in the fj 
fall term. Upon satisfactory completion of the fall term in physical ff| 
education, freshmen may petition the Non-Academic Programs Com- 
mittee for permission to take one of the remaining terms in the Arts and 
Service Program. Thus, freshmen must take a minimum of two terms of 
physical education and may petition for Arts and Service work only if 
they satisfactorily complete the fall term of physical education. Sopho- 
mores and juniors are required to take two terms of non-academic work, 
at least one of which must be in physical education. The student may 
schedule the appropriate remaining term of non-academic work as he 
sees fit. Because of the flexibility in scheduling non-academic work, the 
Non-Academic Programs Committee will consider requests to postpone 
fulfillment of the requirement only in unusual circumstances. Fulfillment 
of the requirement means satisfactory completion of three terms of non- 
academic work, at least two of which are in physical education, by the 
end of the freshman year; satisfactory completion of five terms, at least 
three in physical education, by the end of the sophomore year; satis- 
factory completion of seven terms, at least four in physical education, 
by the end of the junior year; and satisfactory completion of all eight 
terms, of which five are in physical education, by graduation. A student 
who receives an Unsatisfactory in any term must take appropriate non- 
academic work every term until he is caught up in the requirements. 

In its non-academic work, the College insists on the same high quality 
of teaching which it demands in its academic courses. A distinction in 
the two types of work is needed not because one is thought to be less . 
important than the other, but because in the opinion of the faculty 
the two kinds of work are different and should not be equated. 

151 



A student wishing to receive Arts and Service credit for any super- 
vised activity outside the specific programs Hsted below, must apply in 
advance to the Non-Academic Program.s Committee. His petition must 
outline in detail the activity, and propose an acceptable means for 
evaluating his accomplishment. Although students are urged to diversify 
by taking different courses in the Arts and Services Program, the Non- 
Academic Programs Committee will consider petitions requesting credit 
for another term for continuing in an activity. 

APPLIED MUSIC Mr. Reese 

Three and a half hours a week 

Students may receive Arts and Service credit for serious and purposeful study 
of a musical instrument or voice. The study will be at the student's expense. 
To receive credit for any term the student must study with an instructor 
approved by the Chairman of the Music Department and who will remain 
in contact with the Department. The student will fulfill an aggregate of at 
least one half-hour lesson a week and three hours of practice covering the 
corresponding time of each physical education term — fall, winter or spring. 

COMMUNITY SERVICE Mr. Hetzel 

This course provides an opportunity for students to participate in the affairs 
of the community. Upon petition in advance to the Non-Academic Programs 
Committee arrangements are made for scheduled activities such as Boy Scout 
and YMCA leadership, volunteer service in weekend workcamps, the Haver- 
ford State Hospital, penal institutions, etc. 

GLASS BLOWING Mr. Kusel 

Three hours a week 

A course in basic glass blowing. A minimum of four students and a maxi- 
mum of six. Offered in the fall term. 

MACHINE-TOOL WORK 

Three hours a week 

This course, designed for beginners, will include machine-tool work on the 

lathe, milling machine, shaper, and drill-press. Those who have sufficient 

skill will be permitted to use the scheduled period for approved projects of 

their own choice. Offered in the fall and winter terms. Limited to five 

students. 

MODELING AND SCULPTURE Mr. Dioda 

Three hours a week 

A course open to beginning and advanced students. It includes composition, 
portrait, and modeling from life. Students will begin in plasteline, cast in 
plaster, and develop creative compositions in various materials. As artists 
have long been taught to read, so this course aims to teach academic 
students to see. Offered in the fall and winter terms, for a minimum of five 
and a maximum of ten students. 

152 



PAINTING AND GRAPHIC ARTS Mr. Janschka 

Three hours a week 

The purpose of instruction in this course is to help the student in acquiring 
perception and skill in artistic creation and rendition through the media of 
drawing, printmaking, and painting. It will involve an investigation of the 
uses and potentialities of different techniques, employing still life, life models, 
and imagination. For the advanced student the stress is on picturemaking, 
but prior experience is not required. Offered in the fall and winter terms. 
Limited to twelve students each term. 

PHOTOGRAPHY 

Three hours a week 

This is a course for beginners, and will include instruction in the use and 
characteristics of photographic equipment, the processing of films and papers, 
and the composition of subject material both indoors and outdoors. Offered 
in the fall and winter terms. Limited to four students. 

RADIO COMMUNICATION Mr. Benham 

Three hours a week 

This course consists of projects in radio, such as instruction in the Interna- 
tional Morse Code, a study of basic principles, or a construction project 
(the cost of materials to be borne by the student). It may serve as prepara- 
tion for the amateur license examination given by the Federal Communica- 
tions Commission. Offered in the winter term. Admission with the consent 
of the instructor. 

READING AND RECORDING FOR THE BLIND Messrs. Benham and Butman 

Three hours a week 

This course offers the opportunity of reading to students at the Overbrook 
School for the Blind, or making tape recordings of short stories, novels, and 
poetry. Admission with the consent of the instructors. Offered in the winter 
'term, but students wishing to enroll in this course should see Mr. Benham at 
the time of registration for the fall term. 

THEATER ARTS— MOVEMENT ON THE STAGE Mr. Butman 

Three hours a week 

In this course the student is taught how to move on the stage, both in mime 
and regular acting. The purpose is mainly to overcome self-consciousness 
and to help the student in self-expression. Offered in the fall term. 

THEATER ARTS— SPEAKING ON THE STAGE Mr. Butman 

Three hours a week 

A course in which the student is taught how to use his voice on the stage, 
both as a formal speaker and as an actor. Training is given in dramatic 
speaking, verse reading, and public speaking. Offered in the winter term. 

TUTORIAL Mrs. D'Andrea 

Students will be assigned to neighborhood children who are in need of aid 
in academic subjects through the Haverford Tutorial Project. The emphasis 
is on individual attention to the child's specific needs. 

153 



STUDEIMT 



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ACTIVITIES 



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HEALTH PROGRAM 

The Haverford College health program is under the direction of the 
College physician, who holds office hours at the Infirmary at stated hours 
and is available in any emergency. Also available to all College students 
by appointment at the College Infirmary, is a qualified psychiatrist. The 
advice and help of expert medical consultants may be obtained readily 
at the Bryn Mawr Hospital. When necessary, additional consultants are 
obtained from one of the University Hospitals in Philadelphia. The 
College nurse is on duty at the Infirmary at all times. 

Each student is required to have a complete physical examination 
by his own physician before entering the College and each year before 
returning to campus. A report of this examination, on a form supplied 
by the College and signed by the student's physician, must be submitted 
to the College physician not later than October 1 each year. Follow-up 
examinations are given when indicated by the College physician. In- 
fluenza vaccine is recommended and given to the entire student body 
each year, at no additional cost to the student. Immunization against 
smallpox, tetanus, poliomyelitis, and typhoid fever is required before 
entering the college. Pre-entrance chest X-ray examination is strongly 
recommended. 

Each student is entitled to unlimited dispensary service, at stated 
hours, and emergency service at any time. 

In case of illness, each student is entitled to two weeks of residence 
in the Morris Infirmary each semester, ordinary medicine, diagnostic 
laboratory work, and X-rays needed for diagnosis, and the services of 
the College physician and resident nurse. 

Students will be charged $5 a day for residence in the Infirmary after 
their first two weeks. Day students will be charged for board in addition, 
while in the Infirmary. 

Each student is also covered by a blanket accident policy which pays 
actual expenses resulting from any accident up to a limit of $1000, for 
each accident. The expenses covered include X-rays, medicine, surgical 
appliances, hospital bills, nursing care, physician's fee, surgeon's fee, 
and also dentist's bills for repair or replacement of natural teeth as a 
result of an accident, subject to the approval of the College physician. 
The coverage is in force from 12:01 a.m. Standard Time three days 
before the date when registration of entering students begins until 
midnight three days after Commencement Day. 

All of these services and benefits are covered by the unit fee which 
is paid by all students (see page 40) . 

156 



STUDENT GOVERNMENT 

The Students' Association is made up of all undergraduates at 
Haverford College. The College has delegated to the Students' Associa- 
tion — and the Association has accepted — the responsibility for nearly 
all aspects of student conduct and of student organizations on the 
campus. The main instrument for exercising this unusual degree of 
self-government is the Students' Council, composed of elected repre- 
sentatives from each class. 

The Students' Council is both an executive and a judicial body. It 
handles all phases of the administration of regulations of the Students' 
Association. It manages extracurricular activities, exclusive of athletics, 
and allocates to each organization a percentage of the unit fee. 

The presidency of the Students' Council is the most important under- 
graduate office at Haverford. The president represents the student body 
before the Board of Managers, the College administration, and the 
faculty, serving both as liaison officer and as executive. 

HONOR SYSTEM 

The honor system at Haverford is based on the belief that students 
can successfully take the responsibility of establishing and maintaining 
standards in social and academic life. In the academic area the honor 
system stipulates that one should distinguish clearly between one's own 
work and material from any other source. Since examinations are not 
proctored at Haverford, suitable conduct is required by accepted code. 
In the social area the guiding principle is respect for women guests and 
for the College community. 

The honor pledge is called to the attention of each applicant for 
admission to Haverford College: 

"I hereby accept the Haverford College Honor System, 
realizing that it is my responsibility to safeguard, uphold, 
and preserve each part of the Honor System and the atti- 
tude of personal and collective honor upon which it is 
based." 

Specifically, each student who enters Haverford pledges himself to 
uphold three responsibilities under the honor system: (1) to govern 
his own conduct according to the principles which have been adopted 
by the Students' Association; (2) in case of a breach of the honor 
system to report himself to the Students' Council; (3) if he becomes 
aware of a violation by another student, to ask the offender to fulfill 
his pledge by reporting himself. If the offender refuses, the student 

157 



is pledged to report the matter to the Students' Council. In this manner 
each individual becomes personally responsible for the successful opera- 
tion of the entire honor system. 

There are several ways in which the honor system contributes to the 
quality of student life at Haverford. There is educational value in 
considering carefully the factors which make standards necessary and 
in deciding as a group what standards and regulations are needed in a 
College. It follows that a large degree of self-government is made 
possible since students are willing to respect those standards which 
they themselves have set up. At the same time Haverford successfully 
meets its responsibility to the community by maintaining an acceptable 
level of conduct. With his privileges and responsibilities more clearly 
defined, a Haverford student enjoys a freedom which contributes to 
the atmosphere of integrity and mutual confidence that prevails at the 
College. 

Each entering student must feel confident before selecting Haverford 
that he can give his active support to the honor system. He should 
realize that its success, which is of great importance to him personally 
and to the whole student body, and indeed to the College itself, de- 
pends upon his willingness to give it his complete support. 

Because of the honor system, students at Haverford can schedule 
their own midyear and final examinations within the period of time 
set aside for them. The inequities which result when the examination 
schedule is arranged impersonally are thus eliminated. The system is 
administered by a student committee cooperating with the Registrar, 
and is perpetuated by serious student commitment to academic re- 
sponsibility and the honor system. 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS AND COMMITTEES 

The Drama Club, in conjunction with the Bryn Mawr College 
Theatre, produces on the average three major plays a year, alternating 
between the Bryn Mawr and Haverford stages. The workshop of the 
club, with lectures and discussions on all vital aspects of play produc- 
tion, is open to all regardless of previous experience. 

The Haverford College Glee Club, the chief musical organization 
of the College, is open to all students who have a love of music and 
enjoy singing. A schedule of trips and joint concerts with choruses of 
the principal women's college is planned each year, sometimes in- 
cluding a concert tour during spring vacation. The club presents major 
choral works as well as numbers for male voices. Rehearsals are held 
twice weekly. 

158 



The Heinrich Schutz Singers (mixed chamber chorus of Haverford 
and Bryn Mawr students) is open to qualified singers who are members 
of the College Glee Club. 



The Radio Club operates the College radio station, WHRC, which 
broadcasts to both the Bryn Mawr and Haverford campuses. Members 
of the club arrange programs, operate the station, and build or buy 
necessary equipment. The studios are located in the Union building. 



The Varsity Club of Haverford College, organized in 1936, is 
composed of undergraduates who have won varsity letters. Its purpose 
is to advance the interests and ideals of the College through athletics. 



The Social Action Committee unites all civil rights, civil liberties, 
peace, and other social movements under a single organization. 



Aiesec (Association Internationale des Etudiants en Sciences Eco- 
nomiques et Commercials) is an international student organization with 
chapters in 26 countries. Its purpose is to place students in foreign 
countries during the summers in order that they may experience differ- 
ent cultural surroundings along with some practical business experience. 



The Social Committee plans for mixers, weekends, and trips. 



The Community Relations Committee secures good public rela- 
tions with the area through tutoring and recreation programs. 



The Customs Committee is in charge of introducing the freshmen 
to the College in September. 



The Campus Culture Committee publishes a listing of Philadelphia 
area cultural events, organizes trips to museums, plays, and opera in 
New York and Philadelphia, and directs the Student Ticket Agency 
(STAGE) for discount orchestra and theatre tickets. 

159 



STUDENT PUBLICATIONS 

The Haverford News is a weekly newspaper, published on Fridays, 
during the college year, by undergraduates. There are opportunities 
for all interested men on both editorial and business staffs. 

The Haverford College Handbook is published each fall under 
the auspices of the Students' Council. It contains information par- 
ticularly valuable to new students. 

The Record, the College yearbook, is published annually by the 
senior class, with the financial support of the Students' Association. 

The Haverford Revue is a magazine devoted to student literary 
efforts. It is normally published twice a year. 



160 



FELLOXA/SHIPS, 
SCHOLARSHIPS 

AIMD 
I 




* ::^1^^-' 



ENDOWED FELLOWSHIPS FOR HAVERFORD GRADUATES 

Clementine Cope Fellowships, established in 1 899 by Clementine 
Cope, granddaughter of Thomas P. Cope, member of the Board of 
Managers from 1830 to 1849. 

These fellowships are to "assist worthy and promising graduates of 
Haverford College in continuing their studies at Haverford or at some 
other institute, in this country or abroad, approved by the Board of 
Managers." 

First and Second Cope Fellows are nominated by the faculty, and 
selected by the Board of Managers. Individual stipends, not to exceed 
$1,000, are determined by the Board, 

Letters of application, accompanied by relevant statements of extra- 
curricular activities, must be in the hands of the President by March 1. 

Augustus Taber Murray Research Fellowships, established in 
1964 by two anonymous friends "in recognition of the scholarly attain- 
ments of Augustus Taber Murray, a distinguished alumnus of Haverford 
College of the Class of 1885." 

These fellowships are for further study in English literature or 
philology, the classics, or German literature or philology, in other In- 
stitutions, toward the degree of Doctor of Philosophy or its future 
equivalent. 

Only unmarried students are eligible. Further considerations are the 
candidate's promise of success in graduate work and the availability of 
other financial assistance in his proposed field of study. 

Usually one Augustus Taber Murray Research Fellow is nominated 
by the faculty, on recommendation of the Committee on Honors and 
Fellowships. Individual stipend is $900. The same student may be 
awarded the fellowship for two or three years. 

Letters of application must be in the hands of the President by 
March 1. 

ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIPS 

(It is not necessary for applicants to mention specific scholarships in 
their applications except in those cases where they meet the special condi- 
tions stated for the award.) 

1890 Memorial Scholarship Fund — Estabhshed by a member of 
the Class of 1923 in memory of his father, of the Class of 1890, and in 
recognition of his father's friendship with the members of his class. The 
income from this fund is to be awarded as a scholarship by the College 
to a deserving student. 

162 



M. A. Ajzenberg Scholarship Fund — Established in 1962 in 
memory of M. A. Ajzenberg, for students planning to major or majoring 
in physics or astronomy, preferably graduates of public schools in New 
Jersey or New York City. 

Joseph C. and Anne N. Birdsall Scholarships — Scholarships, 
awarded at the discretion of the faculty to some student or students 
preparing for medicine, the selection to be based on character, scholar- 
ship, and financial need. 

Caroline Chase Scholarship Fund — Established December 10, 
1951, by Caroline Chase, daughter of Thomas Chase, one-time President 
of the College. This fund is an expression of Thomas Chase's enthusiastic 
appreciation for its high standards of scholarship in Greek, Latin, and 
English literature. 

Class of 1904 Scholarship Fund — Established June 4, 1954, in 
commemoration of the 50th Anniversary of the Class of 1904. The in- 
come from this fund, which was contributed by the class and the families 
of its deceased members, will provide one scholarship. 

Class of 1912 Scholarship Fund — The fund was given in com- 
memoration of the 50th Anniversary of the Class of 1912. The 
income is to be used for scholarship purposes, such scholarship being 
awarded preferably to an African or Asian student, but if no such 
recipient is available this scholarship may be assigned to some other 
deserving student. 

Class of 1913 Scholarship — One scholarship, preference to be 
given to descendants of members of the Class of 1913 who may apply 
and who meet the usual requirements of the College. 

Class of 1917 Scholarship — One scholarship, preference to be 
given to descendants of members of the Class of 1917 who may apply 
and who meet the usual requirements of the College. 

Class of 1936 Scholarship Fund — Established in 1961 by the 
Class of 1936 as a 25th Anniversary Gift, the income is to be used for 
scholarship aid without restriction. 

W. W. Comfort Fund — This fund was established in 1947 by the 
Haverford Society of Maryland. Grants from this fund are made with 
the understanding that the recipient shall, at an unstated time after 
leaving College, repay to the fund the amount which he received while 
an undergraduate. 

163 



J. Horace Cook Fund — Established in 1955 by a bequest under 
the will of J. Horace Cook, of the Class of 1881, for a scholarship, 
one to be awarded each year so that there will be a student in each class 
receiving his tuition from this fund. 

Howard M. Cooper Scholarship — Upon her death, on April 11, 
1966, a gift of part of the residue from a Deed of Trust created by 
Emily Cooper Johnson, a friend of the College, became effective. This 
fund is for the establishment of the "Howard M. Cooper Scholarship," 
the use of which is intended for such students as need assistance to 
acquire education, preference being given to members of the Religious 
Society of Friends and especially to those affiliated with Newton Prepara- 
tive Meeting of Friends of Camden, New Jersey, of which Howard M. 
Cooper was a life-long member. 

Thomas P. Cope Scholarship — One scholarship. 

Daniel E. Davis, Jr. Memorial Scholarship — One scholarship, 
awarded at the discretion of the faculty, "on the basis of character, 
scholarship, and financial need." 

Kathleen H. and Martin M. Decker Foundation Scholarship 
— Established in 1958, the Kathleen H. and Martin M. Decker Founda- 
tion Scholarship is awarded annually to young men preparing themselves 
in the fields of physics, mathematics, chemistry, and biology. The Scholar- 
ship Committee, in making their selections, will have regard for candi- 
dates who rank high in scholarship, leadership, and character. At least 
one scholarship will be given each year with a maximum grant of $1000. 
The (actual amount of the stipend will be determined by the financial 
need of the candidate. 

Jonathan and Rachel Cope Evans Fund — Founded in 1952 by 
the children and grandchildren of Jonathan and Rachel Cope Evans, one 
half of the income of this fund is to be used for scholarships. 

The F of X Scholarship — Established by the bequest of Legh Wilbur 
Reid, who died April 3, 1961 and who was the esteemed professor of 
mathematics at the College from 1900 to 1934. His will provides that 
the scholarship is to be known as The F of x Scholarship. The scholar- 
ship is to be awarded to a student in the sophomore, junior, or senior 
class who has successfully completed the freshman course in mathematics 
at Haverford College, who has shown a real interest in mathematics and 
who has given promise for the future of his work in that subject. 

164 



Christian Febiger Memorial Scholarship — One scholarship, es- 
tabhshed June 13, 1946, by Mrs. Madeleine Seabury Febiger in memory 
of her husband, Christian Febiger, of the Class of 1900. The income of 
this fund is applied in paying tuition and other College expenses of 
worthy, needy students. 

Elihu Grant Memorial Scholarship Fund — Two or more schol- 
arships, established February 2, 1944, by Mrs. Elihu Grant to commem- 
orate the service to Haverford College of Dr. Elihu Grant, from 1917 to 
1938 a member of the College faculty. The income from this fund is 
applied to scholarship assistance to students in humanistic studies, pri- 
marily those specializing in the study of Biblical Literature and Oriental 
subjects. In special circumstances the income may be utilized to assist 
those working for a postgraduate degree at Haverford College. 

Roy Thurlby Griffith Memorial Fund — Established in June 
1952, by Grace H. Griffith, in memory of Roy Thurlby Griffith of the 
Class of 1919. The income from this fund is to be awarded as a scholar- 
ship by the College, preference to be given to boys who have no father 
and who are in need of financial assistance. 

Samuel E. Hilles Memorial Scholarship — One scholarship. 

Sarah Tatum Hilles Memorial Scholarship Fund — Founded 
November 1, 1954, by bequest of $75,534.58 from Joseph T. Hilles, 
Class of 1888, in memory of his mother, Sarah Tatum Hilles; to provide 
for such number of annual scholarships of $250 each as such income 
shall be sufficient to create; to be awarded by the Managers to needy and 
deserving students; and to be known as Sarah Tatum Hilles Memorial 
Scholarships. 

Isaac Thorne Johnson Scholarship — One scholarship, available 
for a student of Wilmington College or a member of Wilmington (Ohio) 
Yearly Meeting of Friends. 

Mary M. Johnson Scholarship — One scholarship. 

Jacob P. Jones Endowment Fund — This fund was established in 
1897. The donor stated: "My hope is that under the blessing and favor 
of God there will come from this source a revenue which shall be pro- 
ductive of growth and vigor in the institution as well as help at this 
critical period of their lives to many deserving young men of slender 
patrimony." 

Richard T. Jones Scholarship — One scholarship. 

165 



RuFus Matthew Jones Scholarship Fund — Established in 1959 
by Clarence E. Tobias, Jr., as a testimonial to Rufus Jones "and in 
gratitude for the excellent educational facilities Haverford provided for 
me and my son." The principal and income of this fund are to be used 
for scholarships or loans to students majoring in philosophy. Preference 
is to be given to seniors. The recipient will be selected by the chairman 
of the Philosophy Department in consultation, if he desires, with his 
departmental associates and in accord with the usual scholarship practice 
of the College. The donor welcomes additions to the fund from any who 
might be interested. 

George Kerbaugh Scholarship — This fund was estabhshed in 
1960 in recognition and appreciation of the leadership and personal 
generosity of George Kerbaugh, Class of 1910, who headed the efforts 
of the Triangle Society to provide additional stands for Walton Field. 

George Kerbaugh's many services to the College include his chairman- 
ship of the committee which raised the funds of the Library addition 
built in the 1930's. The Board of Managers then expressed to him 
"its heartfelt appreciation and its sense of great obligation for a notable 
achievement." 

C. Prescott Knight, Jr. Scholarship — Established by the Haver- 
ford Society of New England for a New England boy from a New 
England school. In the award of this scholarship a committee, com- 
posed of alumni of the New England area, will consider character and 
personal qualities as well as the scholastic record and need of the 
applicant. 

Morris Leeds Scholarships — Established in 1953 by the Board of 
Managers of the College in memory of Morris E. Leeds, a member of 
the class of 1888 and chairman of the Board from 1928 to 1945. 

Max Leuchter Memorial Scholarship — Established in December 
1949, in memory of Max Leuchter, father of Ben Z. Leuchter of the 
Class of 1946. One scholarship, awarded at the discretion of the faculty, 
on the basis of character, scholarship, and financial need. 

Archibald Macintosh Scholarship Fund — This fund was estab- 
lished in 1959 and later added to by admirers and friends of Archibald 
Macintosh, and shall be used preferably for scholarship purposes. 

Joseph L. Markley Memorial Scholarship — One scholarship, 
awarded at the discretion of the faculty, on the basis of character, 
scholarship, and financial need. 

Sarah Marshall Scholarship — One scholarship. 

166 



Charles McCaul Fund — Established in 1951 by Mary N. Weath- 
erly. One or more scholarships which shall be awarded to students who 
show special interest in the field of religion and the social sciences. 

William Maul Measey Trust — Estabhshed in 1952 by William 
Maul Measey, a friend of the College, who has been deeply interested 
in education and who has wished to help students of high quality in the 
pursuit of their education. 

J. Kennedy Moorhouse Memorial Scholarship — One scholar- 
ship, intended for the member of the freshman class who shall appear 
best fitted to uphold at Haverford the standard of character and conduct 
typified by the late J. Kennedy Moorhouse of the Class of 1900 — "a 
man modest, loyal, courageous, reverent without sanctimony; a lover of 
hard play and honest work; a leader in clean and joyous living." 

W. LaCoste Neilson Scholarship — Established in 1957 by the 
family and friends of W. LaCoste Neilson, Class of 1901, in his memory. 
The income is to be used for the payment of one or more scholarships 
at the discretion of the College, preference if possible being given to 
students taking scientific or practical courses rather than those in the 
field of the arts. 

Scholarship of the New York Haverford Society — Established 
in 1963 for a resident of the New York area who is a member of the 
freshman class. 

Paul W. Newhall Memorial Scholarship — One scholarship. 

Inazo Nitobe Scholarship Fund — Established in November, 1955, 
under the will of Anna H. Chace, the income to be used and applied 
for the education at Haverford College of a Japanese student who shall 
be a resident of Japan at the time of his appointment to such scholarship 
and for his traveling expenses from and to Japan and his living expenses 
during the period he shall hold such scholarship. 

The Jose Padin Puerto Rican Scholarship Fund — The fund was 
established in October 1966 by a gift from Paulina A. Padin in memory 
of her husband, Dr. Jose Padin, of the Class of 1907. As both Dr. and 
Mrs. Padin had their origins in Puerto Rico, the donor desires that this 
fund should benefit deserving students from that island. The amount of 
the scholarships, their number and the method of locating such deserving 
students is to be in the hands of the administration of the College. It is 
the principal wish of the donor that Puerto Rico should profit by the 
education of its students at Haverford College and that this fund should 
be a perpetual memorial for Jose Padin, who during his lifetime did so 
much for education in his native country. 

167 



Louis Jaquette Palmer Memorial Scholarship — This scholar- 
ship is awarded on application, preferably to a member of the freshman 
class who, in the opinion of a committee representing the donors and the 
President of the College, shall give evidence of possessing the qualities 
of leadership and constructive interest in student and community welfare 
which his friends observed in Louis Jaquette Palmer of the Class of 1894. 

Reader's Digest Foundation Scholarship Fund — This fund was 
established in July 1965 by a grant of $2500 from the Reader's Digest 
Foundation, and substantially increased in 1966 and 1967. The income 
only is to be used for scholarship purposes. 

Scott Award — Established in 1955 by the Scott Paper Company 
Foundation. A two-year scholarship award for the junior and senior 
years, to be given to that student who is planning to embark upon a 
business career and who is judged by both students and faculty as an 
outstanding member of the sophomore class. 

Geoffrey Silver Memorial Scholarship — One scholarship, avail- 
able to a public school graduate in this general area who may enter 
Haverford. 

Daniel B. Smith Scholarship — One scholarship, awarded in the 
discretion of the faculty, as an annual scholarship for some young man 
needing financial aid in his college course. Preference is to be given to a 
descendant of Benjamin R. Smith, if any such should apply. 

Jonathan M. Steere Scholarship Fund — Established in Decem- 
ber, 1948, by Jonathan M. Steere of the Class of 1890. The scholarship 
is intended primarily for a graduate of Moses Brown School, Providence, 
R. I., who shall be a member of the Society of Friends. 

Summerfield Foundation Scholarship Fund — Established in 
February, 1956. One scholarship, awarded at the discretion of the faculty, 
on the basis of character, scholarship, and financial need. 

William Graham Tyler Memorial Scholarship — Founded in 
1949 in memory of William Graham Tyler of the Class of 1858. Prefer- 
ence shall be given to students from Oskaloosa, Iowa, or from William 
Penn College, on the basis of character, scholarship, and financial need. 

A. Clement Wild Scholarship — Established May 14, 1951, by 
Mrs. Gertrude T. Wild in memory of her husband, A. Clement Wild of 
the Class of 1 899. The income from this fund is to be awarded as a 
scholarship by the College to a deserving student. Preference shall be 
given to an English exchange student or someone in a similar category. 

168 



Isaiah V. Williamson Scholarship — Three scholarships, usually 
awarded to members of the senior and junior classes. 

Caspar Wistar Memorial Scholarship — One scholarship, avail- 
able preferably for sons of parents engaged in Christian service (includ- 
ing secretaries of Young Men's Christian Associations) or students de- 
siring to prepare for similar service in America or other countries. 

GiFFORD K. Wright Scholarship Fund — Established in December, 
1955, in memory of Gifford K. Wright of the Class of 1893. 

Edward Yarnall Scholarship — One scholarship. 

Robert Martin Zuckert Memorial Scholarships — Two or more 
scholarships, preference to be given to a native of New York or Con- 
necticut who now resides in one of those states. 

PRIZES AND AWARDS 

Alumni Prize for Composition and Oratory — A prize of $50 
was established by the Alumni Association in 1875 to be awarded 
annually for excellence in composition and oratory. Competition is open 
to freshmen and sophomores, but the same man may not receive the 
prize twice. The competition for this prize is administered by the Depart- 
ment of English. 

John B. Garrett Prizes for Systematic Reading — A first prize 
of $150 and a second prize of $75 will be given at the end of the sopho- 
more, junior, or senior year to the two students who, besides creditably 
pursuing their regular course of study, shall have carried on the most 
profitable program of reading in a comprehensive topic during a full 
college year. 

Candidates for these prizes must register with the chairman of the 
department under whose supervision the work will be performed. The 
department is responsible for guiding the work and, not later than 
April 15, for reporting the achievement to the Committee on Honors 
and Fellowships, for final judgment. Either on both of these prizes may 
be omitted if, in the judgment of the committee, the work does not 
justify an award. 

Interested students should apply directly to a relevant department for 
information. 

Class of 1896 Prizes in Latin and Mathematics — Two prizes of 
$10 each, in books, to be known as the Class of 1896 Prizes in Latin 
and Mathematics, were established by the bequest of Paul D. I. Maier 

169 



of the Class of 1896. They are awarded at the end of the sophomore 
year to the students who have done the best work in the departments 
concerned. 

Lyman Beecher Hall Prize in Chemistry — A prize of $100 was 
estabhshed by the Class of 1898 on the 25th Anniversary of its 
graduation, in honor of Lyman Beecher Hall, Professor of Chemistry at 
Haverford College from 1880 to 1917. 

This prize may be awarded to a student who has attained a high 
degree of proficiency in chemistry and who shows promise of contribu- 
ting substantially to the advancement of that science. It may be awarded 
to a junior, to a senior, or to a graduate of Haverford College within 
three years after graduation. It may be awarded more than once to the 
same student, or it may be withheld. 

Class of 1902 Prize in Latin — A prize of $10, in books, is offered 
annually by the Class of 1902 to the freshman whose work in Latin, in 
recitation and examinations combined, shall be the most satisfactory. At 
the discretion of the professor in charge of the department, this prize 
may be omitted in any year. 

Department Prize in Mathematics — A first prize of $30 and a 
second prize of $20 are awarded on the basis of a three hour examina- 
tion on selected topics in freshman mathematics. The examination is 
held annually on the first Monday after the spring recess, and is open 
to freshmen only. 

Elliston p. Morris and Elizabeth P. Smith Peace Prizes — 
These have been combined into a single competition offering three 
awards of $400, $200 and $100 respectively. It is open to all under- 
graduates and to graduate students. 

The prizes are awarded for the best essays bearing on the general topic 
of "Means of Achieving International Peace." Essays should be deposited, 
with the Registrar not later than May 1. The judges shall be appointed 
by the President of the College. Prizes will not be awarded, if, in the 
opinion of the judges, a sufficiently high standard of merit has not been 
attained. 

Prizes in Philosophy and Biblical Literature — A first prize of 
$40 and a second prize of $25, in books, are offered annually to the 
students who, in the judgment of the professor in charge, do the most 
satisfactory outside reading in philosophy in connection with the courses 
in that department. 

170 



A first prize of $40 and a second prize of $25, in books, are offered 
annually to the students who, in the judgment of the professor in charge, 
do the most satisfactory reading on the Bible and related subjects. 

Scholarship Improvement Prizes — A first prize of $50 and a 
second prize of $45 are awarded at the end of the senior year to the two 
students who, in the opinion of the judges appointed by the President of 
the College, show the most steady and marked improvement in scholar- 
ship during their college course. 

Founders Club Prize — A prize of $25 is awarded annually by the 
Founders Club to the freshman who is judged to have shown the best 
attitude toward College activities and scholastic work. 

S. P. LiPPiNCOTT Prize in History — A prize of $100 is offered 
annually for competition in the Department of History under the follow- 
ing general provisions : 

First — Competition is open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors who 
have taken or are taking work in the Department of History. 

Second — The prize shall not be awarded twice to the same student. 

Third — The prize may be withheld in any year if, in the opinion of 
the judges, a sufficiently high standard of merit has not been attained. 

Fourth — An essay of not less than 5000 words, written in connection 
with course or honors work in history, or independently of course work, 
treating a subject selected with the approval of a member of the History 
Department, shall be submitted as evidence of scholarly ability in the 
collection and presentation of historical material. It shall be typewritten 
and deposited with the Registrar not later than May 1. 

Newton Prize in English Literature — A prize of $50 estab- 
lished by A. Edward Newton may be awarded annually on the basis of 
final honors in English, provided that the work of the leading candidate, 
in the judgment of the English Department, merits this award. 

William Ellis Scull Prize — A prize of $50, established in 1929 
by William Ellis Scull, Class of 1883, is awarded annually to the upper- 
classman who shall have shown the greatest achievement in voice and 
in the articulation of the EngHsh language. This prize is administered 
by the Department of English. 

George Peirce Prize in Chemistry or Mathematics — A prize 
of $50 in memory of Dr. George Peirce, Class of 1903, is offered annu- 
ally to a student of chemistry or mathematics who has shown marked 
proficiency in either or both of these studies and who intends to follow 

171 



a profession which calls for such preparation. Preference is to be given 
to a student who has elected organic chemistry, and failing such a stu- 
dent, to one who has elected mathematics or some branch of chemistry 
other than organic. Should there be two students of equal promise, the 
one who is proficient in Greek shall be given preference. The prize is 
offered, however, exclusively for students who have expressed the inten- 
tion of engaging in research. 

Edmund J. Lee Memorial Award — Classmates of Edmund Jen- 
nings Lee, Class of 1942, who lost his life in the service of his country, 
have established in his memory a fund, the income for which is to be 
given annually to that recognized undergraduate organization which has 
contributed most toward the furtherance of academic pursuits, extra- 
curricular activities, spiritual growth, or college spirit in individuals or 
in the College as a whole during the year. The award is to be used in 
continuing to render such service. 

William W. Baker Prize in Greek — A prize of $25, in books, 
established in 1954 in memory of William W. Baker, professor of Greek 
at Haverford College from 1904 to 1917, is given in the study of Greek, 
and is administered by the Classics Department. 

Kurzman Prize in Political Science — A prize of $125, estab- 
lished in 1958 by Harold P. Kurzman, is awarded annually for the senior 
who has performed best and most creatively in political science, except 
when in the judgment of the department no student has done work of 
sufficient merit to warrant such award. 

Hamilton Watch Award — A Hamilton watch is awarded to that 
senior, majoring in one of the natural sciences, mathematics, or engi- 
neering, who has most successfully combined proficiency in his major 
field of study with achievements, either academic or extracurricular or 
both, in the social sciences or humanities. 

John G. Wallace Class Night Award — A silver cup to be 
awarded annually to the best actor in the Class Night performances. 

Prizes for Excellence in the French Language — The French 
Department may recommend to the Committee on Honors and Fellow- 
ships, the names of two students in French 13-14 who, in its opinion, 
are worthy of the award of a full scholarship to the Summer in Avignon 
Program of Bryn Mawr College (covering all but transportation). These 
two scholarships will be awarded upon approval of the Committee and 
acceptance of the applicant by Bryn Mawr College, as the First and 
Second Prize for Excellence in the French Language. 

The Varsity Cup — An award given to the member of the Senior 
Class who excels in leadership, sportsmanship, and athletic ability. 

172 




IIM 



IN 



PAGE 

Academic Buildings 30-32 

Academic Council 26 

Academic Flexibility 50-52 

Accident Insurance 42, 156 

Administration 19-22 

Admission 37-40 

Admission — Advanced Standing 39-40 

Admission — Early Decision 39 

Admission — Examinations .... 37-39 
Admission — Requirements for. . 37-40 
Admission — Transfer Students ... 39 

Advanced Standing 39-40 

Affiliations, Library 35 

African Studies 57, 58 

AIESEC 159 

Aims and Objectives 28-29 

Alumni Association 173-174 

Alumni Clubs 175-178 

Alumni Representatives 179-186 

Anthropology 145-150 

Application for Admission .... 37-39 

Applied Music 152 

Applied Science 83-85 

Arboretum 37 

Art Collection 35 

Art, Histoiy of 105 

Arts and Service Program . . 151-153 

Astronomy 63-64 

Athletic Facilities 36, 119 

Audited Courses 53 

Autograph Collection, 

Charles Roberts 34-35 

Bachelor's Degree 44 

Barclay Hall 36 

Biology 65-68 

Board of Managers 6-9 

Board Charges 40-41 



PAGE 

Bookstore 36, 41 

Borton Room 33 

Bryn Mawr College, 

Cooperation with 56 

Calendar 4-5 

Campus 29-37 

Campus Map 193 

Center for Nonviolent 

Resolution of Conflict 58-59 

Chase Hall 30 

Chemistry 69-72 

Classical Civilization 75 

Classics 73-75 

Collection 28 

Collections, Library 34-35 

College Calendar 4-5 

College Entrance Board Tests.. 37-39 

College History 29 

College Honors 59-60 

College Responsibility 42 

Comfort Hall 36 

Committees — Board of Managers . . 8-9 

Committees — Faculty 26 

Committees — Student 158-159 

Community Service 152 

Comprehensive Major 

Examination 44, 47-48 

Computer Center 30 

Computer Usage 30, 83 

Conflicting Courses 53 

Concentrated Program 50-51 

Cope Field 36 

Correspondence Directory 192 

Corporation Awards 43 

Corporation — Officers of 6 

Corporation — Standing 

Nominating Committee 6 

Courses Changes 53-54 



188 



PAGE 

Course Intensification 45 

Course Load 45 

Course Numbering 62 

Courses of Instruction 63-153 

Curriculum 44-60 

Degree, Bachelor's 44-49 

Developmental Reading 52 

Diets, Special 41 

Distribution Requirement 45-46 

Dormitories 36 

Drama Club 158 

Drinker Music Center 30, 32 

Dropped Course 54 

Early Decision — Admission 39 

Economics 77-81 

Electives, Free 46 

Electives, Non-Academic. . 46, 151-153 
Endowed Fellowships for 

Haverford Graduates 162 

Endowed Scholarships 162-169 

Endowment 29-30 

Engineering 83-85 

English 86-91 

Enrichment and 

Independent Study 50-51 

Evaluation of Academic 

Performance 54-56 

Examinations for Admission . . . 37-39 
Expenses 40-42 

Faculty, Members of 12-19 

Faculty, Standing Committees of . . 26 

Fees and Special Charges 40-42 

Fellowships, Augustus Taber 

Murray Research 162 

Fellowships, Clementine Cope ... 162 
Fellowships, Scholarships 

and Prizes 162-172 



PAGE 

Field House 36, 1 19 

Fifth Day Meeting 29 

Final Honors 51, 59-60 

Financial Aid 42-43, 162-169 

Fine Arts 91 

Flexibility Program 50-52 

Founders Club 60 

Founders Hall 30, 36 

Free Electives 46 

French 137-140 

French House 36 

Freshman Program 49-50 

General Courses 92-93 

General Scholarships 43 

German 95-98 

Glass Blowing 152 

Glee Club 158-159 

Government, Student 157-158 

Graduate Fellowships 162 

Greek 73.75 

Gummere Hall 36 

Gymnasium 36, 1 19 

Hall, Lyman Beecher Building ... 30 

Handbook 160 

Haverford News 160 

Health Program 156 

Heinrich Schiitz Singers 159 

Hilles Laboratory 30 

History (Courses) 99-104 

History of Art 105 

History of College 29 

Honor Pledge 157 

Honor Societies 60 

Honor System 28, 157-158 

Honors 59-60 

Housing 36, 40-41 

Humanities General Courses 92 



189 



PAGE 

Independent Study 50 

Infirmary 36, 156 

Intercollegiate Cooperation 56 

Interdepartmental Program 50 

Jones Hall 36 

Jones, Rufus M. Collection on 

Mysticism 34 

Jones, Rufus M. Study 33 

Junior Year Language Program ... 57 

Languages, Foreign 46 

Latin 73-75 

Lecture and Laboratory Courses . . 54 
Lectures and Lectureships 23-25, 57-58 

Leeds Hall 36 

Library 32-35 

Library Staff 20-21 

Lincoln University, 

Cooperation with 56 

Linguistics, General Courses ..... 92 

Lloyd Hall 36 

Loan Fund, Student 43 

Location, College 36-37 

Lunt Hall 36 

Lyman Beecher Hall Building .... 30 

Machine-tool Work 152 

Major Concentration 46-49 

Managers, Board of 6-9 

Mathematics 105-107 

Medical Staff 20 

Meeting, Friends 29 

Modeling and Sculpture 91, 152 

Monthly Payment of College Bills . . 42 

Music 32,35-36,58,109-111 

Music Center, 

Henry S. Drinker 32, 36 

Music Collection 32, 35-36 



PAGE 

Non- Academic Electives.. 46,151-153 

Observatory 3 1-32 

Organizations, Student 158-159 

Painting and Graphic Arts 153 

Phi Beta Kappa Society 60 

Philips Visitors (Fund) . . 23-24, 57-58 

Philosophy 111-115 

Photography 153 

Physical Education 117-119 

Physical Science General Course. . 93 

Physics 119-123 

Placement 44 

Political Science 123-128 

Post-Baccalaureate 

Fellowship Program 59 

Princeton University, 

Language Study at 57 

Prizes and Awards 169-172 

Professions, Preparation for .... 52-53 

Psychology 129-133 

Publications, Student 160 

Quaker Collection 34 

Radio Club 159 

Radio Communication 153 

Radio Station 159 

Reading and Recording for 

the Blind 153 

Reading, Developmental 52 

Record 160 

Regulations 53-56 

Religion 133-136 

Residence Fee 40-42 

Residence Halls 36 

Resources 29-37 

Revue 160 

Rhoads Fund 25 



190 



PAGE 

Roberts Hall 36 

Romance Languages 137-141 

Room and Board 40-42 

Russian 143 

Scholarships, 

Application for 42-43, 162 

Scholarships, List of 162-169 

Sculpture 91, 152 

Sharpless Hall 30, 3 1 

Shipley Lectures (Fund) 25 

Snack Bar 36 

Social Action Committee 159 

Social Science General Courses ... 93 

Society of Friends 29 

Sociology 145-150 

Spanish 140-141 

Special Appointments 18-19 

Special Diets 41 

Special Collections, Library . . . 34-35 

Speech 49-50 

Sports, Intercollegiate 118-119 

Staff 19-22 

Standing Committees of the 

Board of Managers 8-9 

Standing Committees of the 

Faculty 26 

Stokes Hall 30-31 

Strawbridge Memorial 

Observatory 31-32 

Student Activities Fee 40 

Student Aid 43 

Students' Association 157 

Student Committees 159 

Students' Council 157-158 

Student Government 157-158 

Student Loan Funds 43 

Student Organizations 158-159 



PAGE 

Student Publications 160 

Study Abroad 51, 56-57 

Summer Programs 21-22, 58-59 

Swarthmore College, 

Cooperation with 56 

Theater Arts 153 

Thesis Program 50 

Transfer Students 39 

Treasure Room, Library 33 

Tuition 40,41 

Tutorial 153 

Union 36 

Unit Fee 40-41,42 

University of Pennsylvania, 

Cooperation with 56 

University of Pennsylvania, 

Language Study at 57 

Varsity Club 159 

Varsity Sports 118-119 

Visiting Faculty on 

Special Funds 23-25 

Visitors and Lectures 57-58 

Walton Field 36, 119 

Whitall Hall 30, 36 

WHRC 159 

Williams House 36 

Woolman Walk 37 

Yarnall House 95 



191 



CORRESPONDENCE DIRECTORY 

For information on: Write to: 

Admissions and Catalog Requests William W. Ambler 

Director of Admissions 

Alumni Affairs William E. Sheppard 

Director of Alumni Affairs 

Athletic Affairs Roy E. Randall 

A thletic Director 

Business Matters Charles W. Smith 

Comptroller 

Gifts or Bequests Burt Wallace 

Vice President 

Graduate Schools David Potter 

Associate Dean 

Medical Affairs WiUiam W. Lander, M.D. 

College Physician 

Publications and Publicity William Balthaser 

Director of Public Relations 

Records and Transcripts Virginia H. Kline 

Registrar 

Scholarships and Loans William W. Ambler 

Director of Admissions 

Special Programs Gerhard E. Spiegler 

Provost 

Student Affairs James W. Lyons 

Dean of Students 



192 




.:m^. 







HAVERFORD 
COLLEGE 
ATHLETICS 
1967-1968 



^mititm'temri^.'i' -'•.•■■**«■ 



PHOTOGRAPHS: Carl Grunfield '68 

Theodore B. Hetzel 
Ernest J. Prudente 
Eric 0. Smith '69 




VARSITY CUP 

"Sportsmanshio. . .Leadershio. . .Athletic Ability" 

Francis P. Engel 



DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION 



JOHN R. COLEMAN, President 

ROY E. RANDALL, Director 

Head Coach of Baseball 

WILLIAM DOCHERTY, JR., 

Head Coach of Golf 

ERNEST J. PRUDENTE, Head Coach of Basketball 
Assistant Football Coach 
Assistant Baseball Coach 

NORMAN B. BRAMALL, Head Coach of Tennis 

Assistant in Physical Education 

HOWARD COMFORT, Head Coach of Cricket 

FRANCIS E. DUNBAR, Head Coach of Cross Country and Track 

R. HENRI GORDON, Head Coach of Fencing 

FREDERICK W. HARTMANN, Head Coach of Wrestling 
Assistant in Physical Education 

WARREN K. HORTON, Assistant Basketball Coach 

JOHN A. LESTER, JR., Assistant Soccer Coach 

JOSEPH McQuillan, Head Coach of Swimming 

JAMES MILLS, Head Coach of Soccer 

RICHARD 0. MORSCH, Trainer and Equinment Manager 

HOWARD PRICE, Assistant in Physical Education 

DANA W. SWAN, Head Football Coach 

OLIVER G. SWAN, Assistant Football Coach 

JOHN WILSON, Assistant Football Coach 
Assistant Track Coach 



FOOTBALL 



Co-Captains: 



Manager: 

Co-Captains 
Elect: 

Coaches: 



JAMES B. RITTER '68 

LAWRENCE S. ROOT '68 

STEVEN 0. BAILEY '69 

EDWARD M. SLEEPER '69 

WILLIAM P. BICKLEY '69 

DANA W. SWAN Head Coach 

ERNEST J. PRUDENTE Line Coach 

JOHN A. WILSON Assistant Coach 

OLIVER G. SWAN Assistant Coach 



AWARDED FOOTBALL "H' 



James E. Alcock 

Steven 0. Bailey 

Peter E. Batzell 

Stephen W. Batzell 

William P. Bickley 

Luther E. Birdzell 

Joseph D. Boggs 

Donald W. Evans 

Bruce R. Froehlke 

John R. Gleeson 

Robert M . Herron 

Kenneth A. Hicks 

Spencer H. Hipp 

Vincent 



'68 William R. Hobson '71 

'69 Christopher E. Kane '68 

'68 Martin A. Kamarck '71 

'71 William P. Loesche '68 

'69 Robert W. Mong '71 

'70 Jeffrey D. Myers '71 

'68 Samuel S. Porrecca '68 

'71 James B. Ritter '68 

'71 Lawrence S. Root '68 

'69 Jan M. Sachs '70 

'69 Frank A. Santoro '70 

'70 Edward M. Sleeper '69 

'70 Allen W. Stokes '69 

A. Trapani '69 



ADA STEFFAN WRIGHT CUP 
Samuel S. Porrecca 

ALUMNI VARSITY CLUB AWARD 
Samuel S. Porrecca 



SEASON RECORD 



Haverf ord 14 

Haverf ord 14 

Haverf ord 6 

Haverford 

Haverf ord 

Haverford 20 

Haverford 28 



Rensselaer 61 

Dickinson 34 

Johns Hopkins 53 

Wilkes 69 

F & M 47 

Ursinus 7 

Swarthmore 14 



Won; 



Lost; 







U QJ 
in OJ 
(U r- 
O CO 



*0 O (O O l- 



Q --T) o; 



*» c 

3E 
li. 0; 



01 & 
1. c 

o « 
a:: 



W3 



ttC 



FOOTBALL (Continued) 



AWARDED FOOTBALL NUMERALS 



Robert A. Bohrer 
Barry B. Coleman 
Paul J. Herrmann 



"71 Steven E. Miller 

'71 Wayne S. Marge . , 

'71 Henry S. Rivera . 

Craig S. Saxer '69 



'71 
'71 
'71 



STATISTICS 



Rushing 





( 


Times 
larried 


Yards 
Gained 


Yards 
Lost 


Net 
Gained 


Average 
Carry 


Porrecca 
Batzell, 
Sachs . , 
Myers . . 
Gleeson 


P. ...... 


108 
90 
24 
23 
12 
10 

6 

4 

1 

1 

btempts 


536 
300 
31 
71 
33 
12 

2 

6 

2 



Forward Passi 
Comp. 


60 
24 
94 
15 
15 
12 
22 

1 


11 

Comp. 


476 

276 

-63 

56 

18 


-20 

5 

2 
-11 

Yards 
Gained 


4.4 
3.1 
-2.6 
2.4 
1.5 


Evans . . 
Loesche 
Batzell, 
Coleman 


s'.. ...... 


0.0 

-3.3 

1.3 

2.0 


Saxer . . 




-11.0 




■ A1 


Had 
Intercep 


Sachs . . 




101 

50 

5 


49 

11 

3 


.486 
.220 
.600 


502 
70 
23 


8 


Porrecca 
Loesche 




6 










Pass Receivi 

No. 
Caught 


"9, 
Yards 

Gained 


Points 
Scored 






Hicks 




24 
8 
8 
5 
5 
7 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 


185 

123 

50 

93 

64 

23 

4 

1 

32 

13 

7 


6 

12 

6 
6 



6 








Batzell, P. 
Gleeson ... 
Porrecca . . 
Batzell, S. 






Myers 












Bickley ... 
Stokes 





FOOTBALL (Continued) 



Punting 











No. 
Punts 


Yards 
Gained 


Average 






Hicks .. 
Sachs . . 
Saxer . . 
Alcock . 






41 

13 

5 

1 

Scoring 


1164 

413 

151 

30 


28.4 
31.8 
30.2 
30.0 






TDs 


PAT 
Pass 


Attempt 

Run Kick Pasj 


PAT Made 
; Run Kick 


Points 
Scored 


Porrecca 

Batzell, 

Hicks 

Batzell, 

Bickley 

Sacks 


6 
P. 3 

1 
S. 1 

1 


2 

3 
1 

1 


- 


3 
1 

5 
ream Totals 


- 


2 


36 

18 

12 

8 

6 

2 






Net Gain 
Rushing 


Net Gain 
Passing 


Total 
Offense 


Points 
Scored 


Haverford 




682 


t 


595 




1277 


82 


Opponents 




1766 


1 


1039 




2804 


285 




SAMUEL S. PORRECCA 
Ada Steffan Wright Cup 

and 
Alumni Varsity Club Award 



SOCCER 



Co-Captains; 



ALAN C. SERVETNICK '6& 

GLENN F. SWANSON '68 



Manager: 

Co-Captains 
Elect: 

Coaches: 



CHRISTOPHER L. DEMATATIS '70 

STANLEY A. JAROCKI '69 

ERIC 0. SMITH '69 

JAMES MILLS Varsity Coach 

JOHN A. LESTER, JR., J.V. Coach 



AWARDED SOCCER "H' 



Renner S . Anderson '68 

Amos H. C. Chang '68 

Aruneshwar Das '70 

Bruce C. lacobucci '70 

Robert Ihrie, Jr '70 

Stanley A. Jarocki '69 

Steven S. Jones '71 



Arthur D. Newkirk '69 

Harry Ottinger, III '68 

Alan C. Servetnick '68 

Smi th '69 

L. Speller '70 

Swanson '68 

. Taylor '71 



Eric 0. 
Jeffrey 
Glen F. 
James H, 



HAVERFORD COLLEGE SOCCER TROPHY 
Glenn F. Swanson '68 



AWARDED VARSITY NUMERALS 



John A. Lewis 



'71 Bruce E. Ridley 

Arthur M. Rolfe .... '71 



'71 



SEASON RECORD 



Haverf ord 

Haverf ord 2 

Haverf ord 

Haverford 3 

Haverf ord 5 

Haverford 4 

Haverford 

Haverford 2 

Haverford 

Haverford 

Haverford 



Season: 
^League: 



Won 4 
Won 4 



Pennsylvania 3 

*F & M 

Princeton 5 

Moravian 2 

Ursinus 

Lehigh 3 

Dickinson 1 

Muhlenburg 4 

Drexel 3 

Stevens 1 

Swarthmore 2 

Lost 7 
Lost 5 



SOCCER 

Back: B.C. lacobucci ; C.J. Scott; G.R. Strohl ; B.E. Ridley; A.M. Irvinq; C. Laquer; J.H. Taylor; 
A.D. Newkirk; C.C. Dematatis 

Second: S.S. Jones; R.T. Sataloff; D.F. Berry; J. A. Speller; J. A. Dickinson; R. Ihrie; S.A. Jarocki 
E.O. Smith; J. A. Lester (J.V. Coach) 

Front: James Mills (Head Coach); D.H. Foster; J. A. Lewis; R.S. Anderson; G.F. Swanson; 
A.C. Servetnick; A.H.C. Chang; H. Ottinger: A. Das; R.O. Morsch (Trainer) 




SOCCER (Continued) 



INDIVIDUAL SCORING 



Stanley A. Jarocki 7 

Steven S . Jones 4 

Eric 0. Smith 3 

Alan C. Servetnick 1 

Aruneshwar Das 1 



AWARDED JUNIOR VARSITY NUMERALS 



Bartels, Andrew H '71 

Berry, Donald F '71 

Dickinson, Joseph A '70 

Hurd, Mollis T '71 

Irving, Andrew M '70 

Lanson, Gerald F '71 

Laquer, Christopher '71 

Yager, David 



C. 



Lightbody, Richard '69 

Lister, Eric D '70 

Reagan, Robert R '71 

Sargent, John '69 

Scott, Christopher '71 

Silberling, Stephen '71 

Strohl, G'. Ralph '70 

.... '71 



JUNIOR VARSITY SEASON RECORD 



Haverford 

Haverf ord 

Haverford 1 

Haverford 1 

Haverford 1 

Haverford 3 

Haverford 1 

Haverford 



Pri nceton 2 

Penn Frosh 8 

Westtown 3 

Drexel 

Pennsylvania J.V 4 

Ursinus 2 

Haverford School 3 

Swarthmore 6 



Won 2 



Lost 6 



Cantain: 
Manager: 
Cantains Elect; 

Coach: 



CROSS COUNTRY 

SILAS LITTLE, III '68 

ADAM BL I STEIN , '71 

STEPHEN M. ROLFE '69 

ROBERT S. WHITE '69 

FRANCIS E. DUNBAR 




CROSS COUNTRY 
Back: W.A. Hutchins; J.N. Walker; B.W. Hastings; A.M. Woodward; C. Grunfeld 

Second: A.D. Blistein; M.J. n'Leary; R.K. Gifford; S.M. Rolfe; H.D. Mason; Francis E. Dunbar (Coach) 
Front: R.S. White; R.B. Crawford; S. Little; G.L. Bollinger: K.E. Langlev 





SILAS LITTLE, III 
Alumni Varsity Club Award 



RICHARD B. CRAWFORD 
Haddleton Award 



I 



No. meets 
scored in 

No. meets 
parti ci p. 

Total 
Points 

Swarthmore 

Muhlenberg 

Ursinus 

Dickinson 

Lehigh 

Albright 

Drexel 

J. Jopkins 

Rider 

P.M.C. 

F & M 



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Swarthmore 

F & M 

P. M. C. 

Drexel 

Dickinson 

Muhlenberq 

Ursinus 

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Cantain: 
Manager: 
Co-Caotains Elect: 

Coaches: 



BASKETBALL 

Stanley A. Jarocki '69 

Ch'arles S. Whitmore '70 

Stanley A. Jarocki '69 

Kenneth C. Edgar '69 

Ernest J . Prudente Head Coach 

Warren K. Norton Assistant Coach 




BASKETBALL 
Back: E.J. Prudente (Head Coach); J. Davidson; A.D. Newkirk; M. Barnett; R.O. Morsch (Trainer) 
Second: S.O. Bailey; D.B. Thomoson; F.P. Enqel ; B. lacobucci ; W.K. Horton (J.V. Coach) 
Front: D. Berg; K.C. Edgar; S.A. Jarocki; R.G. Lyon 




Francis P. Engel 
Bennett S. Cooner 
Basketball Troohy 



BASKETBALL (Continued) 



COLLEGE RECORDS 



TOTAL POINTS - CAREER (1942 to date) 



Philip D'Arriqo, '56 
George Montgomery, Jr., '46 
Lav/rence T. Forman, '60 
Hunter R. Rav/linqs, III '66 



No. of 
Games 

56 

27 

65 

62 



Total 

Points 

1300 

607 

1020 

879 



Av. per 
Game 
23.2 
22.5 
15.7 
14.2 



MOST POINTS - ONE GAME (1954 to date) 



Philip D'Arriqo, '56 
PhiliD D'Arriqo, '56 
Philip D'Arriqo, '56 



vs. 
Delaware 
P. M. C. 
Drev/ 



Date 
2-18-56 
2-15-56 
12-17-54 



Score 
115-89 
132-91 

91-40 



Pts. 
52 
48 
41 



TOTAL REBOUNDS - CAREER (1954 to date) 



Wm. V. Dorwart, Jr., '63 
Hunter R. Rawlinqs, III '66 
Thomas M. DelBello, '61 
Lawrence T. Forman, '60 



No. of 
Games 

49 

62 

49 

49 



Total 

Rebounds 
786 
839 
594 
429 



Av. 


per 


Game 


16, 


.0 


13, 


.5 


12, 


.1 


8, 


.8 



MOST REBOUNDS - ONE GAME (1957 to date) 



Wm. V. Dorwart, Jr., '63 
Martin G. Weiqert, '58 
Francis P. Enqel '68 
Hunter R. Rawlinqs, '66 
Thomas M. Del Bello, '61 



vs. 
Swarthmore 
Ursinus 
Muhlenberg 
Swarthmore 
P. M. C. 



Date 

2-10-62 

2-12-58 

1-31-68 

2-5-66 

1-6-60 



Score 
84-71 
62-50 
65-70 
78-60 
52-64 



Reb. 
30 
28 
27 
25 
22 



Cantain: 
Manager: 
Captain Elect: 
Manager Elect: 



FENCING 

RICHARD PAPPAS '69 

JAMES F. MULLOOLY '68 

RICHARD PAPPAS '69 

STEPHEN E. BARTON '71 




FENCING 

Back: J.F. Hullooly; M.A. Zabludoff; U.S. White; M.J. Ppyor; F.J. Honevmeyer; N.J. Miller; R.H. Gordon (Coach) 
Front: R.C. Papoas; M.C. Lindsey; A. P. Cohen; S.WiCroDoer 



BOUTS LOST 



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Caotain: 
Caotains Elect: 

Coach: 



WRESTLING 

TIMOTHY L. LOOSE '68 

TIMOTHY B. GOLDING '69 

DOUGLAS R. ROSS '69 

FREDERICK W. HARTMAN 
i\ :; a 




WRESTLING 
Back: W.R. Hobson; C.S. Colvin; T.B. Golding; D.S. Will 
Second: M.E. Snyder; B.E. Ridley; W.M. Yates; D.A. Hart; A.J. Pritchard 
Front: J.M. Barbis; D.L. Thomas; T.L. Loose; D.R. Ross; F.W. Hartmann (Coach) 




TIMOTHY L. LOOSE 
Allan C. Hale Award 



Averaqe 
Doints 



OLD"*!— vouDi — LncMLnouninocj 
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SWIMMING 

Captains: E. DALE ADKINS '68 

PHILIP N. PRITCHARD '69 

Manager: G. RALPH STROHL '70 

Co-Cantains Elect: MICHAEL F. BRISELLI '70 

DAVID M. ROTHSTEIN '70 

Manager Elect: G. RALPH STROHL '70 

Coach: JOSEPH McQUILLAN 

HAVCELORD SCHOOL SWIMMING RECORDS 

r tit AT 

*-• 




SWIMMING 

Back: D.W. Jenkins; A.E. Smith; T.R. Kovaric; 

Second: J. McQuillan (Coach); J. A. Dickinson; 
M.R. Burns; E.D. Adkins; C.R. Wilson 



C.J. Heaton; D.M. Rothstein; M.F. Briselli 



Front: R. Ihrie; S.J. Shaoiro; B.T. Taylor; A.S. Tucker; R.H. Kimball; R.G. Merkler 



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SWIMMING (Continued) 



50 vd. Freestyle 


Co' 


lleqe Record 


£ 




David M. Roths tein 


'70 


24.7 


Swarthmore 


2-24-67 


Phi Tin N. Pritchard 


'69 


24.7 


MASCAC (Trials) 


3-4-67 


David L. Wilson 


'67 


24.9 


MASCAC (Trials) 


3-5-66 


100 yd. Freestyle 










Lawrence M. Russell 


'68 


54.2 


Swarthmore 


2-24-65 


Thomas E. Christy 


'66 


59.4 


Textile 


2-20-64 


Richard L. Adelman 


'65 


1:01.1 


Swarthmore 


2-7-62 


200 yd. Freestyle 










Michael F. Briselli 


'70 


2:02.7 


MASCAC (Trials) 


3-1-68 


Lawrence M. Russell 


'68 


2:08.4 


Drexel 


2-5-65 


David K. Leonard 


'63 


2:13.7 


Drexel 


1-17-62 


500 yd. Freestyle 










Michael F. Briselli 


'70 


5:51.6 


MASCAC (3rd) 


3-2-68 


David M. Rothstein 


'70 


6:05.6 


MASCAC (Trials) 


3-4-67 


Lawrence M. Russell 


'68 


6:17.6 


Textile 


2-10-65 


lOOO^yd. Freestyle 










C. Geoffrey Wilson 


'70 


14:00.9 


Glassboro 


2-17-68 


200 yd. Breaststroke 










Malcolm R. Burns 


'68 


2:32.1 


P.M.C. 


1-31-68 


Malcolm R. Burns 


'68 


2:32.6 


MASCAC (3rd) 


3-5-66 


Malcolm R. Burns 


'68 


2:36.8 


Swarthmore 


2-24-65 


200 yd. Backstroke 










David L. Wilson 


'67 


2:31.4 


Textile 


2-10-65 


David L. Wilson 


'67 


2:34.6 


Drexel 


2-8-64 


James G.M. Weyand 


'62 


2:37.8 


Temple 


2-21-62 


200 yd. Butterfly 










C. Geoffrey Wilson 


'70 


2:24.9 


MASCAC (4th) 


3-1-68 


Michael F. Briselli 


'70 


2:25.0 


Swarthmore 


2-23-68 


Michael F. Briselli 


'70 


2:26.7 


MASCAC (4th) 


3-4-67 


200 yd. Individ. Medley 










Michael F. Briselli 


'70 


2:29.8 


Johns Hopkins 


2-11-67 


S. Stanley Younq 


'66 


2:30.2 


Drexel 


2-8-64 


Thomas E. Christy 


'66 


2:42.4 


Drexel 


2-9-63 


400 yd. Freestyle Relay 










Christopher Y. Lu 


'70) 








Arthur S. Tucker 
Michael F. Briselli 


'70) 
'70)- 


3:40.8 


MASCAC (4th) 


3-4-67 


Philin N. Pritchard 


'69) 








Richard A. Linhtbody'69) 








Philin N. Pritchard 
E. Dale Adkins 


'69) 
'68)" 


3:50.0 


MASCAC (6th) 


3-5-66 


Richard L. Grossman 


'66) 








400 yd. Medley Relay 










David L. Wilson 


'67) 








Arthur S. Tucker 
Michael F, Briselli 


■70) 
'70)" 


4:13.7 


MASCAC (5th) 


3-4-67 


Philin N. Pritchard 


'69) 








David L. Wilson 


'67) 








Malcolm R. Burns 
Richard A. Liqhtbody 


'68) 
'69)" 


4:20.5 


Drexel 


1-14-66 


Richard L. Grossman 


'66) 










•— to 
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I 



BASEBALL 



Co-Caotain: 
Caotain Elect: 

Coaches: 



STANLEY A. JAROCKI '69 

STANLEY A. JAROCKI '69 

ROY E. RANDALL Head Coach 

ERNEST J. PRUDENTE Asst. Coach 



AWARDED BASEBALL "H" 



Douglas A. Berg '71 

Amos H . Chang '68 

Barton J. Craig '71 

Kenneth C. Edgar '69 

Timothy B. folding '69 

Stanley A. Jarocki '69 

Keith E. Langley '69 



Robert W . Mong '71 

Robert E . Primack '68 

John F. Pyfer, Jr '69 

Jan M. Sachs '70 

Craig S. Saxer '69 

Glenn F. Swanson '68 

Donal d B . Thompson '70 



Vincent F. Traoani '69 



GEORGE HAINES BUZBY AWARD 

Robert E. Primack 
AWARDED BASEBALL NUMERALS 



David H. Foster '69 Arthur M. 

Mark J. Greenfield '70 Daniel D. 

VARSITY SEASON RECORD 



Rolfe '71 

Williams '71 



Haverford 10 

Haverford 4 

Haverford 2 

Haverford 2 

Haverford 5 

Haverford 7 

Haverford 3 

Haverford rain 

Haverford 4 

Haverford 7 

Haverford 2 

Haverford 

Haverford 



Eastern Baptist 

Ursinus 14 

Drexel 9 

Drexel 11 

Pharmacy 3 

Franklin & Marshall 19 

P.M.C 10 

LaSalle - 

St. Josenh's 10 

Muhlenberg 11 

Swarthmore 3 

P.M.C 4 

Ursinus 8 



Won 2 



Lost 10 



c 



ex 

> 



+-> 
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TRACK 

Back: W.A. Hutchins; K.A. Hicks; P.E. Batzell ; R.K. Jarvis; M.E. Huibregtse; C. Grunfield 

Second: Francis E. Dunbar (Head Coach); L.S. Root; M.E. Snyder; A.B. Shettel ; M.P. Shaw 
J. A. Mason; John Wilson (Assistant Coach) 

Front: R.B. Crawford; S.W. Batzell; D.W. Evans; S.L. Little; D.C. Yager; M.J. O'Leary 



SILAS LITTLE, III 
Walton Cup 




Co-Cantain: 
Captains Elect: 

Coach: 



TRACK 

SILAS LITTLE, III '68 

STEPHEN M. ROLFE '69 

ROBERT S. WHITE '69 

FRANCIS E. DUNBAR 



♦Silas Little, III '68 

♦Mark P. Shaw '71 

♦Richard K. Jarvis '70 

♦A. Bruce Shettel '71 

♦Richard B. Crawford '71 

♦Lawrence S. Root '68 

♦John C. Ottenberq '70 

♦Stephen M. Rolfe '69 

♦Robert S. White, '69 

♦John S. Sargent '69 

♦David C. Yager '71 

♦Kenneth A. Hicks '70 

♦Michael E. Snyder '70 

♦Joseph A. Mason '71 

"Barry G. Coleman '71 

"William Purvis '71 

"H. Denning Mason '69 

"Alan C. Rogers '71 

"Michael L. Humphries '70 

"Arthur D. Newkirk '69 

"Robert S. Fried '69 

"Steve Batzell '71 

"Mark E. Huibregtse "71 - 

♦Robert K. Gifford '68 (Manager) 

♦William Hutchins '70 (Manager) 

Relay Points 6 



-5 

—J* 

3 
C 


Lycoming/ 
Albright 


f— 

3- 
3" 


-s 

3- 
3 
o 

-5 


BO 


c 
3- 

a- 
n> 

-5 


o 


rt 


TOTAL 
POINTS 


6 


10 


4 


8 


10 


15 


6 




59 


6 


7 


8 


10 


6 


12 


2 


6 


51 


1 


1 


4 


6 


6 


6 


9 


- 


33 


6 


2 


4 


8 


1 


5 


6 


- 


32 


1 


4 


3 


8 


6 


6 


2 


- 


30 


5 


3 


5 


5 


- 


4 


3 


- 


25 


- 


4 


3 


3 


1 


10 


1 


6 


22 


- 


5 


2 


3 


5 


5 


3 


6 


23 


1 


5 


2 


1 


3 


5 


1 


6 


18 


- 


- 


3 


5 


1 


1 


3 


- 


13 


- 


1 


3 


1 


5 


2 


1 


5 


12 


4 


- 


3 


1 


- 


1 


1 


- 


10 


1 


4 


- 


_ 


- 


4 


- 


4 


9 


- 


1 


1 


- 


2 


5 


- 


3 


9 


1 


1 


2 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


6 


- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


1 


- 


2 


3 


1 


- 


1 

1 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


1 

1 


- 


- 


1 


- 





10 



HAVERFORD 
Opponents 



33 
112 



43 
L67 

A70 



50 
95 



62 

83 



48 76 39 
92 69106 



Won: 



Lost: 



TOTAL 
POINTS 



CTir— mcvJOLn<^cMOOro<r>oCT>oovococ\ji 
LnLnco^oroojcMCvj.— r— I— I— 



Relays 



ivDi I I iuDioioiini'<d-nicMi i i 



Triole 
Jump 



I I I I I I I I I I I CTi I I «d- I I I I I I 



Broad 
Jumo 



I I I I I I 



II — I CM I I I I I It— 



High 
Jump 



I O I t <Ti I 



I I I I I I I I I I I I r— I 



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Shotput 
P. Vault 
Javelin 
Discus 
2 Mile 
220 
880 

120 HH 
100 
440 

1 Mile 
440 IH 



I I I I I 



I I I I I 



I I I CO I I I I I CO I I I 



I I I I I vc I I I I I I I 



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<U ' in <U O ' XJ'C i- ta m - m i- i- < — 

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_joo'-3oo«_)cc:ciiC3c/'>-3:t/j5:cjD-s:ce:iE^Li-cQ 



COLLEGE TRACK RECORDS 

Event Time Date 

Two Mile Run 9:53.6 Silas Little '68 4-16-66 

9:57.7 James R. Grosholz '49 5-19-48 

10:2.1 David M. Poole, '42 5-16-42 

One Mile Run 4:20.0 James R. Grosholz '49 5-3-47 

4:26.5 David M. Poole '42 5-9-42 

4:26.5 Walter C. Falconer '42 5-1-42 

880yd. Run 1:51.2 James R. Grosholz '49 6-18-49 

1:58.1 Walter C. Falconer '42 5-14-40 

2:00.8 Robert F. Edgar '31 5-22-31 

440 yd. Dash 49.7 James R. Grosholz '49 5-3-49 

50.2 Walter Palmer '10 1970 

220 yd. Dash 21.7 Malcolm L. Goggin '60 4-27-60 

21.8 Frederick D. tabbutt '53 5-5-53 

22.0 Herbert K. Ensworth '29 5-12-28 

100 yd. Dash 9.9 P. Donald Hopkins '57 5-14-55 

9.9 Eli B. Haloern '52 5-12-49 

9.9 Joseph C. Wingerd '39 5-19-38 

220 Low Hurdles 24.3 Werner E. Muller '60 4-27-60 

24.4 Frederick D. Tabbutt '53 5-5-53 

24.4 Harry H. Derr, III '39 5-19-38 

120 High Hurdles 15.2 Frederick D. Tabbutt '53 5-16-53 

15.4 J. Morris Evans '43 5-13-42 

15.4 Thomas B. Steiger '39 5-20-39 

One Mile Relay 3:25.6 Samuel M. Snipes '41 4-26-40 

John T. Sharkey '40 
Lewis L. Janney '40 
Walter C. Falconer '42 

440 IH 59.6 Mark P. Shaw '71 4-6-68 

0:60.0 Thomas H. Trapnell '67 4-26-67 

Distance 

Shot Put 46'5-l/2" J. Howard Morris, Jr. '30 4-26-30 

41' 8" Francis M. Froelieher '13 1912 

37'8" W. W. Hall '02 1899 

Discus 146' 1/4" J. Howard Morris, Jr. '30 5-24-29 

134 '9-3/8" Raymond M. Thomas '25 5-23-25 

118'8" James L. Pierce '21 1919 

Javelin 238'll-l/2" Stuart L. Levitt '63 6-14-63 

195 '9" Eric J. Harrison '58 4-23-58 

187'll-l/2" Mark H. Randall '58 4-21-56 

Pole Vault 12'll-l/2" E. J. Baylis Thomas '54 4-27-54 

12'9" John M. Hume '51 5-11-51 

12'4" Gifford P. Foley '32 5-21-32 

High Jump 6 '2-3/4" Sturgis S. Poorman '37 5-25-35 

6'!" Edward B. Conlin '99 

Broad Jump 23'7-l/8" Allan C. Thomas, Jr. '28 5-25-28 

22'l/2" William D. Rogers '25 5-16-25 

21 '10-3/4" Victor A. Lamberti '26 5-16-25 



TOTAL 
POINTS 


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Swarthmore 


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CM 
CM 


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CO 


CM 


1 


9-1/2 
8-1/2 


Drexel 


CM 

1 

CM 


CO 


CO 


CM 


1 


- ' 


CO 


4-1/2 
3-1/2 



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P. M. C. 



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CM VD 



CO 



■M 
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Texti 1 e 
Albright 
Temple 
Delaware 



CM 



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I I 

CM CM 



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CM 



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CM 

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GOLF 



Captain: 
Caotain Elect: 
Coach: 



FRANCIS P. ENGEL '68 

PETER K. COLEMAN '70 

WILLIAM DOCHERTY, JR. 




GOLh 
Back: B. Cook; B.C. lacobucci; J. Averick; C.R. Tannenbaum; R.I. Coward; William Docherty (Coach) 
Second: J.L. Allen; L.W. Spoehr; H.A. Jaffee; E.A. Helme; R. Fried 
Front: C.C. Dematatis; W.P. Loesche; F.P. Engel ; P.K. Coleman 



Francis P. Engel 
Haverford College 
Golf Trophy 




I 



TOTAL 
POINTS 



Ursinus 



Drexel 



F & M 



CM 



I 

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CTi 



00 



VO 



vo 



CM 



CM 
I 



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^^1 — ^^1 — ^^ I I O-^ I I I — ^«^i — ^^ 



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La Salle 



Rain 



■— o 



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I I I I CTi O 



OOi— O OOOOi— OOO I I I I CMI^ 



Swarthmore ••^oooo i^oooo i i i i cof— 



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J. Hopkins r-"^. — ^. — ^' — --.- I. — - 1^ I I coi 



O O 
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Lafayette Rain 



Lehigh 



Muhlenberg 



■— OOO oo<— ooooo 



CM I--. 



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r— f^ I — r— f— r— I— < 



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Moravian '~^'~;:^'~^•~;::^'~;I:^'~^ ' ' ' i-^c^o -^ 

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EVENT 



tOOC/ID t/lQ00O00Ot/1Q(/)Oc/)C! 



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* 



Captain: 
Manager: 
Caotain Elect 
Coach: 




TENNIS 
Second: T.W. Welles (Manager); R.A. Swift; F.H. Conroy; T.A. Pancoast; Norman Bramall (Coach) 
Front: R.B. Norris; T.C. Bret! ; D.R. Oelthony 



THE VIRGINIA CUP 
1968 



Robert A. Swift 





CRICKET 




Captain: 


HARRY nniNGER, III 


'68 


Vice Caotain: 


WILLIAM A. McNEIL 


'68 


Manager: 


JAMES F. MULLOOLY 


'68 


Captain Elect: 


ALEXIS SWAN 


'70 


Coach: 


HOWARD COMFORT 






CRICKET 

Back: Howard Comfort (Coach); A. Blistein 

Third: M.J. Pryor; W.A. Phillips; J.F. Mullooly; R.K. Agarwal ; H.C. Perry 

Second: A. Swan; B.E. Ridley; A. Das; W.O. Miles; V. Luketic 

Front: A.C. Servetnick; H. Ottinger; W.A. McNeil; J.D. Kunz 



CRICKET (Continued) 
AWARDED CRICKET "H" 



Ra.iesh K. Aqamal '69 William A. McNeil '68 

Aruneshwar Das '70 Harry ntti nger '68 

Joel D. Kuntz '68 William A. Phillips '69 

Richard G. Lyon '68 Alan C. Servetnick '68 

Alexis Swan ... '70 



COPE PRIZE BAT Alexis Swan (av. 12.8) 

CONGDON PRIZE BALL Harry Ottinger (av. 10.1) 

HAINES FIELDING BELT Joel D. Kunz 

CLASS OF '88 FIELDING BELT Richard G. Lyon 

BLAZER AWARD 

Rajesh K. Aqarv/al 
Aruneshwar Das 
Alan C. Servetnick 
Alexis Swan 

AWARDED CRICKET NUMERALS 

Velimir Luketic '69 Harvey C. Perry '71 

John C. Parkin '71 Miguel J. Prvor '69 

William 0. Miles '70 Bruce E. Ridley '71 

VARSITY SEASON RECORD 

Winner 

Haverford 55 University of Delaware 58 

Haverford 89 Cornell 119 Cornell 

Haverford 94 Maryland/Staten Island won by 5 wickets* ... 

Haverford 55 Fairmount/General Electric declared for 

104 after 3 wickets 

Haverford won by 3 wi ckets Al umni 49 

Haverford 59 for 3 wickets British Cormionwealth did not bat**.. 
Haverford 42 Ursinus 17 Haverford 

*xrs from both Maryland and Staten Island arrived to nlay the match 
on April 27; a match of 16 players to a side was arranged with Haver- 
ford, augmented by 2 visitors, playing the combined visiting XI 's. 

**Match abandoned after 3 wickets on account of rain. 



Commodore: 
Commodore Elect: 



SAILING 

MARTIN T. FULLER 
RICHARD W. FITE . 



'70 
'70 



I 



AWARDED SAILING "H" 

Martin T. Fuller ...'70 
W. Merrick Thomas... '70 



SEASON RECORD 



SPRING Place 

Rutgers Minor 1st 

Navy Chamnionship Eliminations 6th 

Drexel Mi nor> Regatta 3rd 

Haverford Minor Triangular Tie 1st 

Monmouth Mi nor Regatta 3rd 




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Haverford College 

Publication 



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ANNUAL REPORT/ FISCAL REPORT 



CONTENTS 

REPORTS PAGE 

Treasurer 3 

Detailed Fiscal Report 

Auditor's Report 8 

Balance Sheet 9 

Statement of Operations 10 

Statement of Changes in Fund Balances 

and Unexpended Gifts, Grants 

and Income 11 

Statement of Income 13 

Statement of Expenditures 14 

Report on Consolidated Funds 17 

Report on Non-ConsoUdated Funds 22 

Summary of Consolidated and 

Non-Consolidated Funds 23 

Classification of Investments 24 

Additions to Funds 25 

WilHam Maul Measey Trust Auditor's Report 26 

William Maul Measey Trust — 

Statement of Cash Transactions 

and Book Value 27 

Trust Funds 28 

Campus Visitors 72 

Academic Statistics 75 



Haverford College Publication, Vol. 67, No. 5 

Issued six times a year — Jan, Feb, May, Aug, Sept and Dec — by Haverford 
College, Haverford, Pa. 19041. Entered as second-class matter and postage paid 
at Haverford, Pa. 



REPORT OF THE TREASURER 

PRESENTED AT THE ANNUAL MEETING OF THE CORPORATION OF 



HAVERFORD COLLEGE 



OCTOBER 15, 1968 



1 1 is again a pleasure to report to the Corporation and the Board of Managers 
regarding the fiscal operations of the College for the year ending June 30, 1968. 
This report has been audited by Price Waterhouse and Company and the audit 
and their report is on hand. 

OPERATIONS 

With another 7/4% salary increase for faculty and increases for many non- 
faculty members of the College community, and with our now customary 
inflationary trend and, also, with our gradual increase in enrollment, the total 
cost of operating the College rose a little more than 18% from a year ago, 
$3,572,000 to $4,205,174. Our income also rose, from $3,573,549 to 
$4,066,665. Unhappily, expenses were thus slightly greater than income, leaving 
the College with a net deficit of $138,508. 



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This deficit was in part due to the very tight cash position in which the College 
finds itself. Our building program has been proceeding; we have completed the 
three new dormitories at a cost of $1 ,800,000, and are in the midst of the con- 
struction of a new dining hall and the renovation of Lloyd Hall. While we have 
pledges and gifts of more than a sufficient amount to cover these costs, some of 
the securities given being not now marketable, we do not have the cash and have 
therefore had to follow a dual course in the financing of such construction — to 
borrow from the bank, and, in effect, from ourselves, by disposing of certain of 
our securities which would appear to be selling at a rather high premium. I hope, 
and have faith, that this phase of our financial life will pass shortly — that you, 
our Board, our Alumni and friends will Hft us out of our cash difficulties! 

To revert to the operations, it is interesting to note that income and expendi- 
tures of our restricted funds this year amount to $1,050,328 and of this about 
one-half, or $495,428, is for restricted scholarship funds and the post -bacca- 
laureate program, and $294,249 is for sponsored research, the latter nearly double 
the amount received and spent last year. 

Annual Giving from all sources. Alumni, business corporations and founda- 
tions, of $180,805 was up slightly from the year before. Scholarship aid derived 
from scholarship and general funds, ($121,124) from the William Maul Measey 
Trust, ($58,571) and from donations, ($102,633) totaled $282,328 as against 
$247,634 of a year ago. Thus student aid represents 30% of our total tuition 
income. 

In a slightly different form of student aid, $37,447 was from the college budget 
for student employment, and $1 1,370 from ARA (the dining room service) to 
students as wages. 

BUSINESS OFFICE 

1 should now like to depart for a moment from figures and discuss the vitall 
role which the Business and Comptrollers office has come to play in the life of the 
College, due in a very large degree to the competence, imagination and ability of 
Charles Smith. 

When I graduated in 1931 the entire business operation of the College was 
conducted by Oscar Chase, the registrar, and Robert Johnson, the superintendent 
of buildings and grounds. The total item for wages was $40,000 and that of 
salaries for the professional staff was $168,000. Now, in our business office we 
have a staff of 1 1 people, and for the maintenance and care of grounds, under 
the able administration of Elmer Bogart, of 67 people. 

Just a listing of the items which come under the purview and are the obligation 
of Charles Smith are sufficient to show the vast increase in this department and 



the increasing complexity of the operation of the College. He is responsible for: 

Maintenance and supervision of entire accounting operations including reports 
to departments and to the Board, analysis and continued improvement of account- 
ing procedures and control mechanisms; preparation of the budget; supervision of 
such services as insurance, purchases, and maintenance of building and grounds, 
and all matters pertaining to faculty housing; supervision of housekeeping func- 
tions, hiring and firing of all employees except faculty and Presidential appoint- 
ments; supervision and administration of grants from government agencies, 
foundations and other sources and advice to professors and administration regard- 
ing such grants; complete involvement in the long-range economic planning for 
the College; preparation of budgetary and financial statements and attending and 
reporting meetings of the Property Committee, Long-range Planning Committee 
and other related committees. 

With the large amount of construction which has taken place during the past 
few years, with the increasing number of grants for faculty research, and with 
the increased amount of business and administrative details which go along with 
our larger college, the work of this office deserves more than my comment. I 
thought, however, that the Corporation would be interested in the quiet effi- 
ciency of this department. 

ENDOWMENT 

With the gradual improvement of the market, our endowed funds (ConsoUdated 
Investments) show the highest unit value in any year to date — 30.53 — or trans- 
lated into dollars — $18,848,981. The non-consoHdated funds (the largest portion 
of which is the Philips Fund with market value of $5,722,953) are in the amount 
of $7,445,460. The Measey Trust has a market value of $3,430,509, making a 
grand total of all of our invested funds and trusts of $29,748,963. Included in 
these figures are additions to funds by donation and bequest of $1 15,397 and not 
included is a bequest from Ernest R. Reynolds of $1 16,684 which has been added 
to the revolving Student Loan Account. 

It would seem in order to take note of the recent habit, if I may call it such, 
of the 25th and 50th reunion classes to give a fund to the College, in many cases 
unrestricted — joy to the Treasurer's heart. The latest of these is that of the 
Class of '43 which has contributed already $32,000 and has in pledges sufficient 
to make the amount $50,000, the largest Class gift on record. 

Sales of our securities have been, as I have stated above, relatively high in order 
to pay for construction of the several projects. This means that we have an 
unusually large number of capital gains — fortunately. In the ConsoHdated Invest- 
ment account these amount to $739,557, and in the Philips account, $533,242. 



The relative proportion of stocks and bonds is, of course, always of interest. 
This year the picture is somewhat distorted because of the 10.9% advances to 
current funds, which means securities sold (largely common stocks) to enable us 
to loan the proceeds to ourselves for construction purposes. We thus have a figure 
of 53.46% common stocks, 23.89% bonds, 4.59% preferred, 4.24% College real 
estate, 1 .5% mortgages and 1 .4% miscellaneous. 

The unit of income in our Consolidated Investments for the year rose from 
$1.18 per unit of a year ago to $1.26 this year, and the rate of return on market 
value (excluding College real estate) was 4.44% and on Philips account, 3.86%. 

Haverford is fortunate in the farsightedness of those who in past years have 
made gifts and bequests to the College, by which I mean the amount ofsuch 
gifts and bequests that are totally unrestricted both as to use of income and 
principal. These amount to over half of our total of such funds, or $11 ,161 ,263. 
This does not include the Philips fund and the Measey Trust which, as you are 
well aware, are for specific purposes. Parenthetically, one-half of the Philips 
Fund is quite unrestricted as to the use of income, but the principal may not be 
drawn down. 

COLLEGE HOUSING 

I should like again this year to report on the housing of our faculty. As I said 
last year, the College undertook to build five Techbilt houses on Duck Pond Lane. 
These were completed at an average cost of $37,226 per house, including the cost 
of sewers and roads. They are proving moderately satisfactory, but it would 
appear that it is more satisfactory to secure somewhat larger, older houses in the 
neighborhood for a lesser amount. We have thus acquired two semi-detached 
houses on Berkley Road in Ardmore, premises 421 W. Lancaster Avenue, 
practically across from the College, and 749 Rugby Road, on the Haverford edge 
of Bryn Mawr. 

Pursuant to our policy of granting mortgages (at a lower than market rate of 
interest) to those faculty who prefer to buy their own houses, we have given such 
mortgages in the amount of $1 14,000 to four faculty members. 

EXPANSION 

A final word concerning the very substantial effects of expansion on the 
finances of the College. When we started our expansion, we knew we were hard 
pressed for space in all our buildings as the student enrollment was then 450 for 
a campus planned for not more than 300 — with many of the buildings outmoded 
by reason of age. The result of our gradual increase of enrollment to the present 
625, eventually 700, has been almost a complete restructuring of the campus. 
We have built five new dormitories, we have built an entirely new science building 
and completely renovated the chemistry building and only the walls of Sharpless 



Hall are the same, so complete was the renovation of that building. We have more 
than doubled the capacity and size of the library, we are building an entirely new 
dining room complex, and there are still unmet needs. All of this construction and 
renovation has put a severe strain on our finances in spite of increasing tuition 
income and the generosity of many of our Alumni and friends. While being 
sanguine about our present status, I am also optimistic about the future. By in- 
creasing Annual Giving, by gifts and bequests we can and will, hopefully, meet 
this challenge. 



Respectfully submitted, 




Wm. Morris Maier, Treasurer 



Price \Vaterhouse &. Co. 

Independence Mau. West 
Philadelphia 19106 

October 14, 1968 



Board of Managers 

The CorporaLion of Haverford College 



We have examined the balance sheet of the Corporation of Haverford 
College as of June 30, 1968 and the related statements of operations and changes 
in fund balances and unexpended gifts, grants and income for the year then ended. 
Our examination was made in accordance with generally accepted auditing standards 
and accordingly included such tests of the accounting records and such other 
auditing procedures as we considered necefesary in the circumstances. It was 
impracticable for us to extend our examination of contributions received beyond 
accounting for amounts so recorded. 

The College follows the practice of writing off property and plant 
additions as their cost is funded. Accordingly, the cost of College property, 
other than certain residences which are included in endowment fund assets and 
unfunded construction costs, is not reflected in the accompanying statements. 

In our opinion, except that the cost of College property Is not fully 
reflected, as described in the preceding paragraph, the accompanying financial 
statements present fairly the financial position of the Corporation of Haverford 
College at June 30, 1968 and the results of its operations and changes in fund 
balances and unexpended gifts, grants and income for the year in conformity with 
generally accepted accounting principles applied on a basis consistent with that 
of the preceding year. 



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THE CORPORATION OF HAVERFORD COLLEGE 

Statement of Operations 
Year Ended June 30. 1968 



Income 

Student fees 
Endowments and trusts 
Gifts and grants 
Auxiliary enterprises 
Rental of facilities 
Other 



General 
sources 



$1,224,144 

768,727 

180,806 

730,306 

75,248 

37.107 



Restricted 
sources 
(Note 1) 



292,440 
757,888 



Total 



$1,224,144 

1,061,167 

938,694 

730,306 

75,248 

37.107 



3.016.338 



1.050.328 



4.066.666 



Expenses 



Educational and general 










Administration 


295,484 


270 




295,754 


Student services 


174,322 






174,322 


Staff benefits 


243,106 


3,759 




246,865 


General institutional 


190,330 


88,351 




278,681 


Instruction 


940,297 


71,210 


1 


,011,507- 


Libraries 


154,065 


68,960 




223,025 


Maintenance and operations 


379,130 


9,990 




389,120 


Sponsored research 


5,000 


294,250 




299,250 


Computer center 


34,021 


18.109 




52,130 




2,415,755 


554,899 


2 


,970,654 


Auxiliary enterprises 


682,609 






682,609 


Student aid 


56.482 


495.429 




551,911 




3,154.846 


1,050.328 


4 


,205,174 



Net decrease in general fund 
balance resulting from 
operations - Note 1 



$ (138,508) 



$ - 



$ (138,508) 



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THE CORPORATION OF HAVERFORD COLLEGE 



Notes to Financial Statements 



June 30. 1963 



Note 1 - Unexpended gifts, grants and income 

The College follows the practice of reflecting restricted gifts, grants 
and endowment income in the statement of operations only to the extent of expendi- 
tures from such funds during the year. Receipts in excess of current year's 
expenditures are added to the balances of unexpended gifts, grants and income. 
This method of reporting is generally acceptable for colleges. 



Note 2 - Loan funds 

Loan funds comprise the Class of 1934 Revolving Loan Fund, established 
in 1959 by gifts from the Class of 1934 (100% participation) in the amount of 
$10,784, and the Haverford College Loan Fund established in 1926. At June 30, 1968, 
pertinent information as to each fund is as follows: 



Class of 
1934 



1926 
fund 



Total 



Student loans outstanding 
Advance from endowment fund 
Fund balance 



$58,677 

50,891 

8,460 



$198,422 

173,304 

34,526 



$257,099 

224,195 

42,986 



The student loans outstanding bear interest at varying rates and are 
payable ten years after the student completes his formal education. Of the total 
loans outstanding at June 30, 1968, balances aggregating $24,165 are currently 
payable. 



12 



StaLencnt of Income 



30 June 1968 



Unresticted Restricted 



Total 



1. Educational and General 
A. Student Fees 
Tuition 
Cash 

Scholarship and General Funds 
Wm. Maul Measey Trust 
Donations 



Unit Fee 
Other Fees 

Total Student Fees 



847,106.34 $ 
121,124.26 
58,571.40 
102,633.00 



1,129,435.00 

76,660.00 
18,049.05 



$1, 224,144. 05 $ 



847,106.34 

121,124.26 

58,571.40 

102.633.00 



1,129,435.00 

76,660.00 
18,049.05 



$1,224,144.05 



B. Endovnncnt Income 

From Unrestricted Funds 
From Restricted Funds 

Library 

Special 
Stock Dividends 

Total Fndovraient Income 



$ 756,770.19 $ 



5,564.25 
6.392.13 



20,991.94 
123,474.84 



$ 756,770.19 

20,991.94 

129,039.09 

6.392.13 



$ 768,726.57 $ 144,466.78 $ 913,193.35 



C. Gifts and Grants 
Alumni 

Business Corporations 
Foundations 
Other 

Donations 

Sponsored Research 

Total Gifts and Grants 



D. Organized Activity 

Computer Center 

E. Other Sources 

Rental of Facilities S Miscellaneous 
Other 

Total Otlier Sources 
Total Educational and General 



$ 150,922.42 $ 
29,738.56 
145.00 



22,182.80 $ 173,105.22 
18,514.00 48,252.56 

71,223.70 71,368.70 



126,621.34 
294.249.56 



126,621.34 
294.249.56 



$ 


180,805.98 $ 


532,791.40 $ 


713,597.38 


$ 


23,630.46 $ 


$ 


23.630.46 



75.248.04 $ 
13.476.01 



$ 75,248.04 
13.476.01 



$ 88,724.05 $ 


$ 88,724.05 


$2,286,031.11 $ 


677,258.18 $2,963,289.29 



11. • Auxiliary Enterprises 
Athletics 

Dormitories and Dining Room 
Faculty Housing 
Bookstore 
Infirmary 
Coop 

Total Auxiliary Knterprises 

111. S luci&iir Aid 

Scliolarships and Fellowships 

Prizes 

Post Baccalaureate Program 

Total Student Aid 
Total Income 



849.89 $ 

513,677.90 

76,485.00 

136,227.16 

2,185.55 

880.89 



$ 730,306.39 $ 



$ 849.89 

513,677.90 

76,485.00 

136,227.16 

2,185.55 

880.89 

$ 730,306.39 



$ 146,313.00 $ 146,113.00 

1,860.08 1,860.08 

225.097.11 225.097.11 



$ 373,070.19 $ 373,070.19 



$3,016,337.50 $1,050,328.37 $4,066,665.87 



13 



Statement of Exnendlturea 



30 June 1968 



Unrestricted Restricted 



Total 



1. Educational & General Administration 
A-1, Administration 

President's Office 
Provost's Office 
Ad Hoc Committee 

A-2. Financial 

Treasurer's Office 
Development Office 
Comptroller's Office 

Total Administration 



$ 66,341.78 

31,318.92 

6.114.87 



19,673.51 
95,113.49 
76.921.02 



270.30 



$ 66,341.78 

31,318.92 

6,114.87 



19,673.51 
95,383.79 
76.921.02 



$295,483.59 $ 270.30 $295,753.89 



B. General Expenses 
B-1. Student Services 
Admissions 
Registrar 
Dean of College 
Dean of Students 
Buildings and Grounds 
Guidance Counsellor 
Student Activities 

Total Student Services 



49,787.38 
16,324.07 
14,621.46 
21,770.38 
23,345.79 
9,467.47 
39.005.92 



$174,322.47 



$ 49,787.38 
16,324.07 
14,621,46 
21,770.38 
23,345.79 
9,467.47 
39.005.92 



$174,322.47 



B-2, Staff Benefits 
Faculty 
TIAA 

Social Security 
Medical Plan 
Old Style Pensions 
Disability Insurance 
Tuition Grants 
Moving Expenses 

Non-Faculty 
TIAA 

Social Security 
Tuition Grants 
Pensions 
Disability Insurance 

Total Staff Benefits 



97,996.46 
25,568.69 
10,012.02 
8,000.00 
3,326.00 
7,026.43 
7,972.51 



41,562.40 

19,699.27 

8,985.96 

12,500.00 

456.00 



$ 2,370.00 
1,389.63 



$100,366.46 
26,958.32 
10,012.02 
8,000.00 
3,326.00 
7,026.43 
7,972.51 



41,562.40 

19,699.27 

8,985.96 

12,500.00 

456.00 



$243,105.74 $ 3,759.63 $246,865.37 



B-3. General Institutional Expenses 
Alumni Association 
Alumni Office 
Public Relations Office 
Commencement 
Printing 

Subscriptions and Memberships, etc. 
Mall and Switchboard Service 
Insurance (General) 
Travel 
Speakers 
Entertainment 
Addressograph Room 
Other Expenses 
Interest on borrowed funds 
Inauguration expenses 
Amortization of unfunded Dorm Costs 

Total General Institutional Expenses 
Total General Expenses 



9,011.00 
26,369.90 
38,429.02 

4„888.00 
15,000.00 
13,156.65 
21,014.77 

4,896.17 

1,.248.01 

6,562.37 
4,363.58 

26,609.10 

13,781.85 

5.000.00 



72,986.57 



15,364.20 



$ 9,011.00 

26,369.90 

38,429.02 

4,888.00 

15,000.00 

13,156.65 

21,014.77 

4,896.17 

1,248.01 

72,986.57 

6,562.37 

4,363.58 

15.364.20 

26,609.10 

13,781.85 

5.000.00 



$190,330.42 $88,350.77 $278,681.19 
$607,758.63 $92,110.40 $699,869.03 



14 



Statement of Expenditures 



30 June 1968 



Unrestricted Restricted 



Total 



Instruction 
Salaries 

Supplies and Services 
Faculty Secretaries 
Telephone and Telegraph 
Special Programs 

Total Instruction 



837, 384. 4A 

59,387,53 

34,594.86 

8,930.58 



$ 49,563.32 
4,578.25 



17.068.49 



886,947.76 

63,965.78 

34,594.86 

8,930.58 

17.068.49 



$ 940,297.41 $ 71,210.06 $1,011,507.47 



Organized Activities 
Computer Center 
Language Laboratory 

Total Organized Activities 



$ 34,004.85 $ 18,109.26 $ 52,114.11 
16.60 16.60 

$ 34,021.45 $ 18,109.26 $ 52,130.71 



E. Sponsored Research 
General 
Biology 
Chemistry 
Astronomy 
Psychology 
Physics 

Political Science 
African Studies 
Faculty Research 

Total Sponsored Research 



5.000.00 



$ 20,114.88 $ 20,114.88 



150,737.70 
26,514.76 
29,751.75 
10,631.61 
43,867.54 
12,173.91 
457.41 



150,737.70 
26,514.76 
29,751.75 
10,631.61 
43,867.54 
12,173.91 
457.41 
5,000.00 



5,OOQjOO $294,249.56 $ 299,249.56 



Libraries 
Salaries 

Operating Expenses 
Book. Binding and Periodicals 

Total Libraries 



132,924.42 

13,140.15 
8.000.00 



6,647.69 
62.312.22 



132,924.42 
19,787.84 
70.312.22 



$ 154,064.57 $ 68,959.91 $ 223,024.48 



G. Maintenance and Operation 
Gl. Plant 

Supervision 

Janitorial Services 

Repairs to Buildings 

Equipment 

Water, Heat, Light, Power 

Grounds 

Watchmen 

Total Plant 



$ 37,122.62 $ 
49,769.70 
93,813.13 
17,846.57 
63,542.26 
57,475.12 
29.408.90 



8,133.02 



1,857.05 



37,122.62 
49,769.70 
101,946.15 
17,846.57 
63,542.26 
59,332.17 
29.408.90 



$ 348,978.30 $ 9,990.07 $ 358,968.37 



G2. General 

Property Insurance 
Auto Service 
Social Security 

Total General 

Total Maintenance and Operations 

Total Educational & General 
Administration 



14,885.58 $ 
5,334.12 
9.931.81 



$ 30,151.51 $ 



14,885.58 
5,334.12 
9.931.81 



$ 30,151.51 



$ 379,129.81 $ 9,990.07 $ 389,119.88 



$2,415,755.46 $554,899.56 $2,970,655.02 



15 



Statement of Expenditures 



30 June 1968 



11. Auxiliary Enterprises 
Athletics 
Dormitories 
Dining Room 
Faculty Housing 
Infirmary 
Bookstore 
Coop 
Serendipity Day Camp 

Total Auxiliary Enterprises 



Unrestricted 


Restricted 


Total 


$ 52,880.60 


$ 


$ 52,880.60 


136,378.00 




136,378.00 


256,670.19 




256,670.19 


77,851.55 




77,851.55 


33,197.46 




33,197.46 


122,22A.20 




122,224.20 


A06.6/. 




406.64 


3,000.00 




3,000.00 



$ 682,608.64 



$ 682,608.64 



111. Student Aid 

Scholarships 

Fellowship 

Employment 

Prizes 

Post Baccalaureate Program 

Total Student Aid 
Total Expenditures 



29,272.96 $ 

5,499.45 

21,659.17 

50.00 



253,055.70 $ 

15,788.53 

1,487.47 

225.097.31 



282,328.66 

5,499.45 

37,447.70 

1,537.47 

225,097.11 



$ 


56, 


,481, 


.58 


$, 


495, 


,428. 


,81 


$ 


551, 


,910, 


,39 


$3, 


,154, 


,845, 


,68 


$1 


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24 



ADDITIONS TO FUNDS 



1967 - 1968 

1949 CAMPAIGN SALARY FUND 

From Endeavor Foundation 
CLASS OF 1911-50TH ANNIVERSARY FUND 

From various donors 
CLASS OF 1937-25TH ANNIVERSARY FUND 

From various donors 
CLASS OF 1918-5QTH ANNIVERSARY FUIID 

From various donors 
THE SUCTIERFIELD FOUNDATION SCKOLAHSHIP FUND 

From Foundation - Vi'illiam Felstiner 
THE CLASS OF 1936 SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

From various donors 
ARCHIBALD MACItJTOSH SCHOLARSHIP FUiiD 



From - Anonymous 

60 Maiden Lane Fdn. 
i-ndeavor Fdn. 
Robert G, Wilson 



500.00 
1000.00 
5000.00 

500.00 



READER'S DIGEST FOUNDATION SCIiOLARSHIP FU.'iD 

From Foundation - additional grant 
HOWARD M. COOPER SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

From Trust of Emily Cooper Johnson 
ALPHONSE K. BERTRAND SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

From Bequest of Alphonse N. Bertrand 
RAYNER W. KELSEY FUND 

From various donors 
CARLISLE & BARBARA K. MOORE FUND 

From Mr. & Mrs. Carlisle Woore 
DAVID R. BOWEN PREMSDICAL FUND 

From Lewis H. Bowen 

FUND FOR THE DEVELOPhSNT OF THE NATURAL 
BEAUTY OF THE HAVERFORD CAi^PUS 

From John A. Silver 
THE CLASS OF 196^ FACULTY SALARY FUND 

From various donors 

ADA STEFFEN V/RICHT MEi-'.ORIAL CUP 

From Willard H. Wright and 

Alia Toraashevsky Wright 450.00 

Kidder, Peabody &. Co. 100.00 

JOHN SHINN STUDENT LOAN FUND 

From the Bequest of Ernest R. Reynolds 



TOTAL 



$ 5,000.00 

180.00 

3,627.50 

7,107.75 

1 ,000.00 

860.00 



7,000.00 

2,500.00 

55,559.63 

26,093.83 

235.00 

628.75 

115.00 

4,860.00 



80.00 



550.00 
$115,397.46 



$116.684.64 



25 



Price \Vaterhouse & Co. 



Independence Mall West 
Philadelphia 19106 

October 14, 1968 



Board of Managers 

The Corporation of Haverford College 

In our opinion, the accompanying statement of cash transactions and 
book value of the William Maul Measey Trust presents fairly, on a basis 
consistent with that of the preceding year, the income and principal transactions 
of the Trust for the year ended June 30, 1968 and cash balances and book value at 
that date in accordance with the provisions of the Trust agreement. Our examina- 
tion of this statement was made in accordance with generally accepted auditing 
standards and accordingly included such tests of the accounting records and such 
other auditing procedures as we considered necessary in the circumstances. 



\^c^'W^^l„..^^ir^ 



WILLIAM MAUL MEASEY TRUST 

This trust was established by William Maul Measey by agreement dated 
June 27th, 1952 and supplementary agreement dated April 26th, 1956. 

The trust agreements provide that the income shall be granted as aid to 
students without restriction as to sex, race or reUgious affihation, in selected secon- 
dary schools or colleges, who on the basis of character, scholarship and financial 
situation, merit assistance in continuing their education. 

In secondary schools aid is to be given to students who Uve in the institutions 
during school terms, and not to day students. 

The capital of the trust is to be invested solely in common or ordinary 
corporate shares. 



26 



Mllilim mm MPASEY TRUST 

Statement of Cash Transactions 
And Book Value 

For the Year Ended June 30. 1968 



Book value of Trust at July 1, 1967 
Realized capital gains 

Book value of Trust at June 30, 1968, 
including principal cash 



$1,508,864.22 
319.928.37 

$1.828.792.59 



Cash Statement of Receipts and Expenditures 
Principal 



Cash balance July 1, 1967 
Investments realized 



Investments made 

Cash balance June 30, 1968 



Income 

Cash balance July 1, 1967 representing 
prior year income and reserve 

Disbursements in year 

To Haverford College for administration 

of Trust 
To Haverford College for aid to 

81 students 
To secondary schools for aid to 

69 students 



Current year income 

Income from investments July 1, 1967 to 

June 30, 1968 
Interest earned from savings fund account 

Cash balance June 30, 1968 



$ 10,474.90 
52,374.51 
44. QQO-QQ 



108,456.19 
2.321-57 



$ 4,364.06 
343.272.24 

$ 347,636.30 

$ 323,623.21 
24.013.09 

$ 347.636.30 



108.236.24 



106.849.41 
1,386. £3 



UQ.777-7& 

$ 112,164.59 



In order that the income available from the Trust for aid to students may be known 
at the beginning of each fiscal year, such income is accumulated and not awarded 
nor disbursed until the following year. 



27 



TRUST FUNDS 

W. PERCY SIMPSON TRUST 
Provident Trust Co. and William J. Clark, Trustees 

This perpetual Trust was established under the will of W. Percy Simpson, 
Class of 1890, who died Second Month 19, 1938. The will provides that one fourth 
of the net income from the residuary estate, after the death of his widow ( who 
died in 1940) and of his son (who died in 1946), shall go to two grandchildren, 
and of the remaining three quarters one tenth shall go to Haverford College. Thus 
Haverford's share of the income now is 3/40th. The income comes partly from 
securities but largely from Texas Oil Royalties and rentals. Of the present income 
as estimated by the trustees, Haverford's share is about $1,875 per annimi. 

The will further provides "without imposing any obUgation upon Haverford 
College, I recommend to it the advisability of expending the moneys which shall 
from time to time come to it under this will or so much thereof as may be required 
for the examination and analysis of applicants for admission to the College with 
respect to their mental, physical and general qualifications, and of students therein 
for the purpose of determining the field of activity best suited to the individual." 

The will further provides that whenever a vacancy shall occur by the death 
or resignation or otherwise of the individual trustee, the selecting of a new trustee 
shall be done by the governing body of Haverford College, and that if the College 
fails to perform this duty, the payment of further income to it shall terminate. 

HENRY C. BROWN TRUST 
Pennsylvania Co. for Banking and Trusts, Trustee 
Founded Eighth Month 18, 1948, by bequest of estimated value of $183,000 
from Henry C. Brown, of Philadelphia, ex Class of 1866, to the Pennsylvania Co., 
in trust for benefit of Haverford College. The will provides that the income is to 
be used for current expenses. The wall fmther provides that "the said College 
shall have power in its discretion to use a portion of the principal of the said 
trust estate not exceeding in any one year 20 per cent of the original fund for 
permanent purposes such as buildings, books and equipment proper for conduct- 
ing the work of instruction and education." 

NATHAN BRANSON HILL TRUST 
Founded in 1904 by deposit with First National Bank and Trust Company of 
Minneapolis. Minn., Trust, of a paid up fife insurance policy for $5,000 by Sam- 
uel Hill '78, being in memory of his father, Nathan Branson Hill. The income is 
to be used to aid in the maintenance of Haverford College so long as it shall re- 
main under the auspices of the Society of Friends. In 1931 Samuel Hill died and 
the policy realized $5,039. The Trust is to remain in the care of the above named 
bank, now known as First National Bank of MinneapoHs, until 21 years after the 
death of Samuel Hill's son, James N. Hill, who is still aUve. At that time, the Trust 
is to terminate and the principal is to be vested in Haverford College absolutely. 

MARY FULLER COOK TRUST 
Girard Trust Corn Exchange Bank, Trustee Under Deed, Dated July 29, 1948 

This perpetual trust created by deed of Mary Fuller Cook, who died April 25, 
1955, widow of J. Horace Cook, Class of 1881, became operative in so far as the 
College is concerned, July 14, 1957, upon death of a fife tenant. 

The income from this trust is to be added to that from J. Horace Cook Fund 
"subject to the provisions of that fund, but with the understanding that if, in the 
judgment and discretion of the authorities of the College, such income shall be 
needed for purposes of the College other than scholarships, the College shall be 
free to so use it." 



28 



ENDOWMENT FUNDS 
FUNDS FOR GENERAL PURPOSES 



GENERAL ENDOWMENT FUND 

Founded in 1847 with subscriptions of $50,000 by a number of Friends. Addi- 
tions were made as follows: 1868, from an anonymous source, $5,000; 1869, 
bequest of Ann Haines to increase the compensation of professors, $2,670; 1870, 
bequest of Richard D. Wood, $18,682.96; 1872, from WiUiam Evans, $1,000; 
1874, from executors of Jesse George, deceased, $5,000; 1880, bequest of Dr. 
Joseph W. Taylor, $5,000; 1901, legacy of Ann Wilhams, $2,425.50; 1941, from 
children of Aubrey C. Dickson in his memory, $300; 1954, Maria Luisa Gilde- 
meister, $500; 1955, Estate of Elizabeth S. Dillinger, through Bessie Kohne 
Schenck, $3,000; 1958, bequest of Henry H. Goddard, $1,000; 1959, legacy of 
Herbert S. Langfeld '01, $1,000; 1959, legacy of Jeannette K. Holmes, $1,000; 
1960, bequest of Ruth M. Walter, wife of Frank Keller Walter '00, $2,500; 1965, 
bequest of WiUiam H. Harding, '18, $5,000; 1965, gift of Robert L. Retry '20 
$4,015; 1966, gifts of Henry G. Hood, Jr. $20; Silas J. Ginsburg, M.D. $62.50; 
James S. Maier $2,649.41; legacy of Richard CadlDury '07 $500; legacy of Thomas 
Parke '23 $2,000. Present book value $120,594.55. The income is used for salaries 
and scholarships. 

JOHN FARNUM MEMORIAL FUND 

Founded in 1878 by the heirs of John Farnum by gift of $25,000 as a me- 
morial to him. Added to in 1899 by legacy of $10,000 from Elizabeth H. Farnum, 
widow of John Farnum. The income only is to be used to endow a "professor- 
ship of some practical science or Hterature." The chair of chemistry was designated 
as the "John Farnum Professor of Chemistry." The principal is held in the name 
of three trustees for the benefit of The Corporation of Haverford College. Present 
book value, $33,846.95. 



JOHN M. WHITALL FUND 

Founded in 1880 by bequest of $10,000 from John M. Whitall, Sr. Present 
book value, $10,640.09. The bequest is upon the condition that the art of drawing, 
especially mechanical drawing, shall be taught, and the income only is to be 
used, and for this purpose. 



DAVID SCULL FUND 

Founded in 1885 by bequest of $40,000 from David Scull, Sr. Present book 
value, $44,806.59. The income only is to be used to endow a professorship. The 
chair of biology was designated as tlie "David Scull Professor of Biology." 



29 



EDWARD L. SCULL FUND 

Founded in 1865 by net bequest of $9,500 from Edward L. Scull, 1864. The 
legacy was added to the General Endowment Fund, but in 1888 it was set apart 
as a separate fund. Present book value, $11,364.35. The income only is to be used. 
The bequest is free from any legally binding conditions, but it was the testator's 
desire "that some judicious means shall be employed by the Managers to further 
advise students on the subjects of diet and reading." 

WISTAR MORRIS MEMORIAL FUND 

Founded in 1892 by gift of $5,000 in bonds by Mary Morris, widow of Wistar 
Morris, as a memorial to him. There are no restrictions. The income is used for 
general College purposes. Present book value, $5,144.24. 

ISRAEL FRANKLIN WHITALL FUND 

Founded in 1896 by.net legacy of $9,667.83 from Israel Frankhn Whitall. 
Present book value, $10,781.94. The income only is used for the payment of pro- 
fessors or teachers. 

JACOB P. JONES ENDOWMENT FUND 

Founded in 1897 by residuary legacy of Jacob P. Jones. This amounted when 
received to par value of $279,021.60; book value, $332,301.60, and sundry real 
estate. The real estate has all been sold, netting $847,709.92. Present book value, 
$1,301,375.34. The income only is to be used for general College purposes, and 
out of said income there shall be admitted a portion at least of the students either 
free of charge or at reduced rates. In accordance with this provision, about $7,500 
per annum is used for scholarships, and the balance of income for general College 
purposes. Jacob P. Jones' will contains the following: "My hope is that under the 
blessing and favor of God there will come from this source a revenue which shall 
be productive of growth and vigor in the institution as well as help at this critical 
period of their lives to many deserving young men of slender patrimony." 

JOHN FARNUM BROWN FUND FOR THE STUDY OF THE 

BIBLE, BIBLICAL HISTORY AND LITERATURE, 

PHILOSOPHY, AND KINDRED SUBJECTS 

Founded in 1900 by the late T. Wistar Brown as a memorial to his son, John 
Farnum Brown '93. The original gift was in cash and securities of a par value of 
$43,000, shortly afterwards increased by further gifts of $15,000. The founder 
made further gifts of cash and securities until 1915, the total being $19,381 cash 
and $48,500 pax of securities with book value of $41,490. His total gifts therefore 
had a book value of $234,970.81. Of this, $5,000 donated in 1910 is for endow- 
ment of prizes in Bibhcal history and in philosophy. A portion of the income was 
capitalized each year to keep intact the full value of the fund until 1940 when 
this fund was included in the ConsoUdation of funds. Present book value, 



30 



$275,899.76. The income only is to be used for the purpose of making provision 
for the regvdar study of the Bible and Biblical history and literature, and, as 
way opens, for religious teaching. In 1910, the scope and title of the fund were 
enlarged to include "and philosophy and kindred subjects." Income up to $200 
may be used for prizes in Biblical literature and philosophy. 

CLEMENTINE COPE ENDOWMENT FUND 

Founded in 1904 by bequest of $25,000 from Clementine Cope. There are no 
restrictions. The income is used for general College purposes. Present book value, 
$21,493.67. 

JOSEPH E. GILLINGHAM FUND 

Founded in 1907 by bequest of $50,000 from Joseph E. Gillingham. The 
testator said, "I request, but I do not direct, that part of the income of this legacy 
may be used for free scholarships for meritorious students." In accordance M'ith 
this request, $800 was recently appropriated annually from the income for schol- 
arships, the balance being used for general College purposes. Present book value, 
$42,394.72. 

ELIZABETH H. FARNUM FUND 

Founded in 1891. The original principal of this fund, amounting to $10,000, 
was held by the Provident Trust Co. of Philadelphia under a deed of trust created 
by Elizabeth H. Famum of Philadelphia. The income was first paid to a life ten- 
ant until 1914, when income first accrued to the College "for the payment of the 
salaries of teachers and professors by the said College employed." Under date of 
Ninth Month 18, 1944, upon petition of the trustee, concurred in by the College, 
the Court of Common Pleas awarded the principal to the Corporation of Haver- 
ford College "to be administered by it for the purposes set forth in the deed of 
trust in accordance with the non-profit corporation law." Present book value, 
$9,160.24. 

JAMES R. MAGEE FUND 

Founded in 1915 by bequest of $10,000 from James R. Magee, 1859, and 
added to in 1925, 1926, 1928, 1929, 1930, 1931, 1932, 1936, 1937, 1940, 1944, 
1947-48, and 1948-49 by additional payments of $29,182.84, $1,694.84, $499.31. 
$499.68; $488.85, $207.33, $400, $250, $100, $499.89, $175, $197.99 and $7.40, 
under his legacy. Present book value, $45,035.96. There are no restrictions except 
that the income only is to be used. This is appHed to general College purposes. 

ALBERT K. SMILEY FUND 

Founded in 1915 by gift of $1,000 from Daniel Smiley '78, as a memorial to 
his brother, Albert K. Smiley, 1849, and added to in 1924 and 1926. Present book 
value, $1,500.00. There are no restrictions except that preference was expressed 
that the income only should be used. This is applied to general College piuposes. 



31 



THE HINCHMAN ASTRONOMICAL FUND 

Founded in 1917 by bequest of $10,000 par value securities from Charles S. 
Hinchman. Increased in 1928, 1929, 1930, 1931, 1932, 1933, 1934, 1935, and 
1936 by donations of $28,926.95 from a friend of the College. Present book value, 
$39,515.48. The income only to be used "to increase the salary of the astronomical 
professorship so as to provide a suitable instructor in the ennobling study of the 
heavens." 

WALTER D. AND EDITH M. L. SCULL FUND 

Founded in 1918 by bequest of Walter D. Scull, whose death followed 
shortly after the death of his sister, Edith M. L. Scull. Each left his or her estate 
to the other, unless predeceased; in this latter case both American estates were 
left to Haverford College. Both were children of Gideon D. Scull, 1843, and re- 
sided in England. Income accumulated before the receipt of the fund by the Col- 
lege amounted to $16,887.66, of which $15,078.51 was added to the principal of 
the fund. Present book value, $174,560.31. The fund was created to establish a 
professorship of modern English constitutional history, and the chair has been des- 
ignated as the Walter D. and Edith M. L. Scull Professorship of History. 

ALBIN GARRETT MEMORIAL FUND 

Founded in 1919 by legacy of $25,000 from Mary Hickman Garrett, in mem- 
ory of her late husband, Albin Garrett, 1864. Present book value, $26,771.00. 
There are no restrictions. The income is used for general College purposes. 

ARNOLD CHASE SCATTERGOOD MEMORIAL FUND 

Founded in 1919 by gift of $30,000 in secxuities from Maria Chase Scatter- 
good in memory of her son, Arnold Chase Scattergood, of the Class of 1919, who 
died in his Junior year. The income only is to be used toward the payment of pro- 
fessors' salaries. Present book value, $24,381.59. 

FRANCIS B. GUMMERE MEMORIAL FUND 

Founded in 1920. This fund was started by a gift of $25,000 from the late 
Miss Emily H. Bourne, of New York, conditional upon the raising of $100,000 
additional for an endowment of the Chair of English Literatiure in memory of her 
friend, Professor Francis Barton Gvunmere. A committee of alumni, consisting of 
J. Stogdell Stokes '89, chairman; E. R. Tatnall '07, treasurer; Hans Froelicher '12, 
secretary; Charles J. Rhoads '93; Alfred M. ColHns '97; Winthrop Sargent, Jr. '08, 
and Parker S. Williams '94, working wdth President Comfort, organized a compre- 
hensive campaign among the alumni and friends of the College to raise $375,000 
for this purpose and for increase of professors' salaries; the first $100,000 of un- 
specified gifts was used to complete the Francis B. Gummere Memorial Fund to at 
least $125,000, and the balance comprised the Isaac Sharpless Memorial Fund. 
Total book value, $125,569.51. 



32 



ISAAC SHARPLESS MEMORIAL FUND 

Founded in 1920. The alumni of the College conducted during 1920 a cam- 
paign for $375,000 additional endowment for the College to make possible addi- 
tional salaries to the professors. Appeal was made to found two new funds, the 
Francis B. Gummere Memorial Fund and the Isaac Sharpless Memorial Fund. The 
funds received, except where otherwise specified, were first applied to the com- 
pletion of the former up to $125,000 (see above). Specified gifts and donations 
thereafter received were then applied to the Isaac Sharpless Memorial Fund. The 
income only is to be used for salaries of professors. Total book value, $218,728.43. 

GENERAL EDUCATION BOARD FUND 

The General Education Board of New York appropriated $125,000 in 1920 to 
the campaign for increase of endowment when the Francis B. Gummere Memorial 
Fund and the Isaac Sharpless Memorial Fund, totaling $375,000, were raised. 
Interest at five per cent was paid on the full sum for three years, and the $125,000 
in full payment was completed in 1926-1927. Total book value, $126,076.83. 

HAVERFORD IMPROVEMENT FUND AND CONSOLIDATED 
CAMPUS HOUSES ACCOUNT 

Founded in 1922 to hold the Corporation's undivided share in College Lane 
land and eight houses. This property was turned over to the Corporation free of 
debt on Third Month 17, 1922, and with same the then debt of the Corporation 
amounting to $155,942.15 was liquidated. The fund started vdth an undivided 
interest of $19,000. There was added in 1922, $9,000; and in 1925, $2,000. In 
1926, $5,000 of this fund was sold and the proceeds were appropriated for the 
alterations to Roberts Hall. The balance of this fund, $25,000, was also used in 
1927 for the same purpose. The income was used for general College purposes. 

The College Lane land was purchased in 1886 for the benefit of the College 
by David Scull, Justus C. Strawbridge, Richard Wood and Francis Stokes, Man- 
agers of the College and now all deceased. With contributions raised by them and 
by mortgages on which they went on the bonds, funds were raised to build six 
dwelling houses, and two houses were built by the Corporation itself. From the 
income of the houses the debt against the properties was gradually reduced until 
it was entirely liquidated in 1919. The net income from 1919 until 1922, when 
the property was turned over to the Corporation, was applied toward the reduc- 
tion of the Corporation's debt. 

As of Ninth Month 1, 1944, all of these eight College Lane houses, together 
with seven houses which had been bought for the College and formed a part of 
the College debt, and nine other campus houses which were owned free of debt, 
were consolidated at a combined valuation of $281,331.70 into a new Campus 
Houses Account held by ConsoUdated Investment Account. There have been 
additional investments in other College houses from time to time and the present 
book value is $801,035.69. Amortization of 1/2% is to be applied to the annual 
reduction of the investment. 



33 



WILLIAM PENN FOUNDATION 

Started in 1926 toward a fund of $120,000 to establish a chair of lectureship 
in political science and international relations. This fund forms a part of the cen- 
tenary program to raise $1,000,000. This foundation is to be devoted, at the discre- 
tion of the Managers, to provide adequate undergraduate instruction in the theory 
and practice of our own and other governments, in the history of past attempts to 
secure international agreements and in the methods by which good international 
understanding may be promoted and maintained. Book value to date, $102,067.43. 

WALTER CARROLL BRINTON MEMORIAL FUND 

Founded in 1920 by gift of $5,000 by the family of Walter Carroll Brinton, 
Class of 1915, who died in France Twelfth Month 8, 1918, while engaged in 
Friends' Reconstruction Work. The fund sustained the Walter Carroll Brinton 
Scholarship until 1926-1927. It was then increased $6,000 by fm-ther gifts of the 
founders, and at their request the purpose was changed from a scholarship fund to 
form a separately named fund of the William Penn Foundation, with its income to 
be used for the same objects. Present book value, $14,125.79." 

CORPORATION FUND 

Founded in 1928 by setting aside $70,000 of proceeds from sale of 5.811 acres 
of land on the southern boundary and at the southeastern corner of the College 
farm. In 1937, the fund was increased $8,810, being proceeds of the sale of 1.762 
acres of land to the Philadelphia Skating Club and Humane Society for their new 
ice skating rink. In 1951 the fund was increased by $4,994.50, being proceeds of the 
sale of .284 acres of land to Philadelphia Electric Co. In 1953-54 the cost of 
renovation of Philips wing in the Library was taken from this fund ($60,175.56). 
Present book value, $41,928.94. The fund is invested and the income used for 
general College purposes, until otherwise directed by the Managers. 

ELIZABETH J. SHORTRIDGE FUND 

Founded 12 Month 22, 1930, by bequest from Elizabeth J. Shortridge, without 
restrictions. Until otherwise directed by the Managers, the income only is used for 
general purposes. Present book value, $10,000. 

HOWARD COxMFORT MEMORIAL FUND 

Founded in 1934 by gift of $1,000 from President WilHam Wistar Comfort in 
memory of his father, Howard Comfort, Class of 1870, who was a Manager from 
1880 until his death in 1912 and secretary of the Board of Managers from 1884 
until 1908. 

The fund was added to by further gifts from the same donor of $1,000 in 1935, 
$1,000 in 1936, $2,000 in 1937 and $500 in 1949. The income only is to be used for 
general purposes. Present book value, $5,527.31. 



34 



ELLEN W. LONGSTRETH FUND 

This fund was established in 1935 by a bequest of $20,000 and her residuary 
estate from Ellen W. Longstreth, a Friend, belonging to Haverford Meeting and 
living in Bry Mawr. The principal and income are both ururestricted. This bequest 
and residue of $84,416.28, together with further realization on residuary assets and 
and additional amount received upon the death of a Hfe tenant of a trust, made a 
total of $117,520.19. A part of this fund was used for the 1953-56 Building Pro- 
gram. Present book value is $67,520.19. 

ALBERT L. BAILY FUND 

Founded in 1936 by an unrestricted bequest of $5,000 from Albert L. Baily 
'78. The fund was added to in 1962 by a gift of Joshua L. Baily, Jr., $150. The 
income is used for general purposes. Present book value, $5,150.00. 

ELIZABETH B. WISTAR WARNER FUND 

Founded First Month 16, 1937, by unrestricted bequest of $4,950 from Eliza- 
beth B. Wistar Warner, of Germantown, widow of George M. Warner '73. The 
income is used for general purposes. Present book value, $4,950.00. 

T. ALLEN HILLES BEQUEST 

Founded First Month 19, 1937, by receipt of the proceeds of a trust fund 
created in 1935 by T. Allen Hilles, Class of 1870, formerly of Wilmington, Dela- 
ware, recently of Glen Mills, Pa., who died 11th Month 15, 1935. The amount 
received in stocks and cash was $285,000. Proceeds of mortgages of $7,460.94 in 
1938, and final cash from executor in 1939 of $1,603.37 brought the gross total to 
$294,064.31. From this was deducted in 1939 the final settlement of taxes and 
fees totalling $13,300, thus making the final net bequest $280,764.31. Accumulated 
income of $12,489.77 was also received on First Month 19, 1937. In the trust 
created by the donor in 1935 he provided: "The gift to Haverford College shall 
constitute a fund to be known as 'The Hilles Bequest,' and the income shall be 
used "for repair, upkeep and improvement of the building which I have given to 
Haverford College known as the Hilles Laboratory of Applied Science of Haverford 
College. My purpose in making this gift is primarily to relieve the Corporation of 
Haverford College from any additional expense on account of the erection of the 
building which I have given them, and the accompanying expansion of its educa- 
tional activities, but whenever and if the Board of Managers or other governing 
body of the College shall determine it to be for the best interest of the College to 
devote the whole or any part of the income of the fund to use other than those above 
specified such income may be applied to such uses and in such manner as the 
Board of Managers or other governing body may in its absolute discretion deter- 
mine." Present book value, $280,764.31. 



35 



LEONARD L. GREIF, JR. AND ROGER L. GREIF FUND 

Founded Ninth Month 29, 1937, by a gift of $1,000 from Leonard L. Greif '34, 
and Roger L. Greif '37, of Baltimore. The gift was unrestricted, but the Managers 
have set aside this fund as endowment for general purposes, the income only to be 
used, until otherwise determined by them. Futher gifts were received from Leonard 
L. Greif, Jr. in part through the 1949 campaign. The present book value is $7,000. 

EDWARD M. WISTAR FUND 
Founded First Month 9, 1938, by gift of $2,500 from Edward M. Wistar '72, 
for endowment, the income only to be used for general purposes. Present book 
value, $2,500.00. 

MORRIS E. LEEDS FUND 

Founded Sixth Month 26, 1941, by a gift of shares of Leeds & Northrup 
stock, this fund was added to by further gifts of that company's stock during the 
hfetime of Morris Leeds. Upon his death he bequeathed to the College three- 
quarters of his entire residuary estate which bequest, like the gifts made in life, 
was entirely without restrictions either as to principal or income. 

The fund was ordered by the Managers until otherwise directed to be in- 
cluded among the funds for general purposes. After an appropriation for the 1953- 
56 Building Program, it has a present book value of $1,429,792.09. 

J. HENRY SCATTERGOOD FUND 

Founded Tenth Month 1947, by donations totalling $1660 made by members 
of the Board of Managers in recognition of the services for 25 years of J. Henry 
Scattergood '96, as treasiu-er of the Corporation of Haverford College. A further 
gift of $340 was made in 1943-44, $200 in 1949-50, $1,000 in 1950-51 (through 
1949 campaign), $1,000 in 1951-52 (through 1949 campaign), $1,000 in 1952-53 
(through 1949 campaign), and $6,800 in 1953-54 (through 1949 campaign). Pres- 
ent book value, $12,000. 

The income of this fund is to be used in the field of international relations 
and to be at the disposal of the President of the College and the Wilham Penn 
Professor holding the Chair in Political Science and International Relations. If the 
income in any year is not used for the special purposes as stated, in the discretion 
of the president, it may be used for general purposes. It is further provided that 
after Tenth Month 1, 1951 the use of the fund for other purposes, both as to 
principal and income, shall be subject to the direction of the Board of Managers 
of Haverford College. 

PARKER S. WILLIAMS FUND 

Founded Tenth Month 1, 1947, by unrestricted bequest of $100,000 under the 
will of Parker S. Williams, Class of 1894, of Villanova, Pa., who died in 1942. The 
actual amount received from the executors was $103,993.26, due to the increased 
value of certain investments, which were held, instead of being converted, under an 
agreement with the College. Income was paid to the College from time to time 
until the receipt of the bequest. 



36 



GILBERT C. FRY FUND 

Founded Fourth Month 2, 1948, by an unrestricted gift of $1,000 U, S. 
Treasury Bond from Gilbert C. Fry, of Germantown, Philadelphia, Class of 1923, 
in rememberance of his 25th anniversary of graduation. A new fund was set up and 
until otherwise ordered by the Managers, the income only will be used for general 
purposes. Further gifts of $500 was made in 1949-50, $1,000 was made in 1950-51 
(through 1949 campaign), $1,000, 1951-52, and $1,500 in 1952-53, 1960-61, 
$1,581.02. Present book value, $6,581.02. 

DANIEL B. BOYER FUND 

Founded Third Month 3, 1948, with an initial gift of $2,500 in stock from 
Daniel B. Boyer, Boyertown, Pa., Class of 1911. The donor's letter states: "It is my 
desire that the income from the stock be allocated for faculty use. If present reduced 
College income is not sufficient to cover current faculty needs, the Board of 
Managers should not hestitate to sell the shares and apply the proceeds for that 
purpose." A new fund was set up, and until otherwise ordered by the Managers, 
the income only will be used for faculty salaries. 

MARRIOTT C. MORRIS FUND 

Founded Ninth Month 1, 1948, by unrestricted bequest of $10,000 from 
Msuriott C. Morris, Class of 1885, of Germantown. 

The fund is classified among unrestricted funds for General Purposes, and is 
included in Consolidated Investment Account. Book value, $10,000. 

1949 CAMPAIGN SALARY FUND 

Founded Sept. 1, 1950 by a transfer of $107,800 from the receipts of the 1949 
Haverford campaign for additional endowment. 

The income is to be used to augment faculty salaries and for increasing, where 
necessary, the teaching staff to make possible the desired ratio between faculty and 
students. 

Until otherwise ordered by the Board, 10% of the income is to be capitalized 
each year, provided that this shall not reduce the yield from the fund below 4%. 

A portion of the Capital of this fund may be expended at the discretion of the 
Board of Managers in accordance with the policy stated in the campaign appeal. 
Present book value, $206,832.94. 

THE RUFUS M. JONES FUND FOR ADVANCEMENT OF TEACHING 

Founded Sept. 1, 1950 by a transfer of $235,000 from the receipts of the 1949 
Haverford camapaign for additional endowment. 

The income is to be used to stimulate professional growth, encourage desirable 
research, make possible short-term absences for study or to render special service, 
and to raise professors' salaries. 

Until otherwise ordered by the Board, 10% of the income is to be capitalized 
each year, provided that this shall not reduce the yield from the fvmd below 4%. 



37 



A portion of the capital of this fund may be expended at the discretion of the 
Board of Managers in accordance with the poHcy stated in the campaign appeal. 
Present book value, $399,082.30. 

WILLIAM PYLE PHILIPS FUND 

Founded on the death of WiUiam Pyle PhiHps, Class of 1902, of New York 
City, N. Y. on December 18, 1950 by the bequest of his entire residuary estate as 
an endowment fund in perpetuity, the principal is to be invested in such securities 
as the Board of Managers shall deem advisable "but at least Vi thereof to be invested 
in diversified common stocks." 

The income is "to be applied from time to time to such purposes as said Board 
of Managers in their discretion shall deem advisable, provided, however, that 
approximately one-half (/z) of such income be applied to one or more of the 
following purposes: 

"(a) Purchase for the Treasure Room of the College Library of rare books 
which the College would not otherwise buy and comparable with the books men- 
tioned in Article Third hereof; 

"(b) Bringing to the College distinguished scientists or statesmen for a lecture 
or series of lectures, for courses of instruction, for seminars, for research or for 
other academic purposes; and 

"(c) Subscription to important learned periodicals, domestic and foreign, of 
the various humanities and sciences, purchases of back numbers of such periodicals 
and binding of the same for permanent preservation in the College Library." Pres- 
ent book value, $4,756,276.62. 

WILLIAM B. BELL FUND 

Founded in Ninth Month, 1951 by partial distribution of $19,444.44 on 
account of an unrestricted bequest to the College of WiUiam B. Bell, Class of 1900, 
of New York, and in 1953-54 a final distribution of $14,436.47. 

The fund is to be used for General Purposes and is included in Consolidated 
Investments Account. Present book value is $36,178.02. 

DR. THOMAS WISTAR FUND 

Founded in 1952, upon the termination of a Trust by the bequest of the 
residuary estate of Dr. Thomas Wistar, Class of 1858, the funds are to be kept 
invested and the net income used for such purposes either general or special as the 
Managers of said College may direct. Present book value is $25,068.15. 

THE CHARLES McCAUL FUND 

Founded in 1953 by a bequest of Jsth of the residuary estate of Mary N. 
Weatherly. The fund is to be known as The Charles McCaul Fund, in memory of 
her step-father. The income only shall be spent. 

The use of the fund is unrestricted but it is the hope of the testatrix that some 
portion of the income may be used to provide one or more scholarships, and that 



38 



the rest of the income may be used to provide sound and conservative instruction 
in the social sciences. 

"It is my preference that such scholarships be awarded to students who show 
especial interest in the field of refigion and the social sciences, but I do not specifi- 
ally limit the use of the fund, having confidence in Haverford College to teach high 
ideals." The present book value of this fund is $37,187.20. 

ISAAC & LYDIA COPE SHARPLESS FUND 

Founded in 1953 by bequest of $5,000 from Lydia Cope Sharpless, who died 
Sept. 23, 1952, "in memory of my husband Isaac Sharpless." The fund is without 
restriction, and has a present book value of $5,000. 

CLASS OF 1937 FUND 

Founded Fifth Month 16, 1955 by a gift of $4,500 from Margaret A. Lester 
and John A. Lester, '96, in appreciation of the benefits rendered to their son, 
John A. Lester, Jr. '37. 

The fund is unrestricted and has a present book value of $4,500. 

J. HORACE COOK FUND 

Founded in 1955 by a bequest under the will of J. Horace Cook, Class of 1881, 
who died March 25, 1939, this bequest became effective on the death of Mary 
Fuller Cook, his widow. This fund is "to be kept . . . and the income to be used 
for the needs of the College as it shall see fit, but preferably for a scholarship, one 
to be awarded each year so there will be a student in each class receiving his 
tuition from this fund. Ten per cent of the net income for each and every year 
shall be added to principal of this Fund." Present book value, $130,641.02. 

THE FORD FOUNDATION ENDOWMENT FUND 

The Ford Foundation made grants to the college on July 1, 1956 and Jime 27, 
1957, for an Endowment Fund totaling $345,000. 

In accordance with the terms of the gift, "Until July 1, 1966, the principal of 
the grant shall be held by the grantee institution only as endowment, and the 
income from such grant shall be used only to increase faculty salaries. After July 
1, 1966, principal and income of the grant may be used for any educational purposes 
of the institution." 

THE FORD FOUNDATION ACCOMPLISHMENT FUND 
The Ford Foundation also made on July 1, 1956 and June 27, 1957, two 
payments for an accomplishment grant in the amount of $214,000. This grant was 
made in recognition of the fact the College had, with certain other institutions to 
whom similar grants were made, taken the lead in their regions in improving the 
status and compensation of American college teachers. 

"The purpose of the grant shall be to advance the academic program of the 
grantee institution either by increases in faculty salaries or by meeting other 
pressing academic needs. The grant may be spent in whole or in part, from time 
to time, as the grantee institution may determine." Withdrawn in 1965, $138,198.06. 
Present book value, $75,801.94. 



39 



THOMAS HARVEY HAINES AND HELEN HAGUE HAINES FUND 

Founded in 1956 by a bequest of one-third of the residuary estate of Helen 
Hague Haines, this fund was given in memory of Thomas Harvey Haines, Class of 
1896. The proceeds are to be used to "promote understanding among men by 
research, training and teaching in the field of human relations." Present book value 
is $12,426.18. 

EMILY BISHOP HARVEY FUND 

Founded in 1958 by a bequest of $10,000 from Emily Bishop Harvey of 
Radnor, Pa., patron and friend of the College, who died November 12, 1957, this 
fund is without restrictions and is to be used for the general purposes of the College. 
Book value is $10,000. 

CLASS OF 1933 TWENTY-FIFTH ANNIVERSARY FUND 

Founded in 1958 by initial gift of $6,477.50 from the class, at its 25th 
reunion, the income is to be used for general College purposes at the discretion of 
the Board of Managers. However, the Board may use the principal, if conditions 
unforeseen at the time of establishment of the fund make it advisable. Present book 
value, $8,932.50. 

JOHN E. HUME FUND 

Founded in 1959, by a bequest of one-third of the residuary estate of John E. 
Hume, Class of 1897, the fund is unrestricted and is to be used for general pur- 
poses. Present book value, $35,828.17. 

FREDERIC H. STRAWBRIDGE FUND 

This gift was left to the College by Frederic H. Strawbridge, Class of 1887, 
upon his death in 1958. The fund represents the culmination of a long series of gifts 
made during his fifty-one years as a member of the Board of Managers. It is 
unrestricted, and has a present book value of $10,000. 

WILLIAM H. COLLINS FUND 

Established by the bequest of the residuary estate of Julia Cope Collins, who 
died August 20, 1959, and who was long a devoted friend and neighbor of the 
College, and widow of William H. Collins, Class of 1881, for many years head of 
the College Building and Grounds Division, the use of this fund is to be left to 
"the judgment of the governing body of the College." Julia Colhns states in her 
will that "if the income from this fund, or some part of it, could be used for 
scholarships for deserving students, I should approve of such use but ... I do not 
restrict the use of the fund for this purpose." The present book value is $185,110.15. 

MARY FRANCES NUNNS FUND 

Founded in 1960 by a bequest of $25,000 from Mary Frances Nunns, the 
income is to be used for scholarships unless otherwise directed by the Board of 
Managers, they being empowered by the will to use the income for scholarships 
or general purposes. The present book value is $25,000. 



40 



ELI NICHOLS FUND 

This fund, created under the will of Eli Nichols, Class of 1912, representing 
one-half of his residuary estate, came into possession of the College in January, 
1961 on the death of Anna E. Nichols. 

By his will the fund is left to Haverford College "to be added to the general 
endowment funds of said College or to be used by the trustees of said College as 
in their judgment and discretion may be for the best interest of said College." 
Withdrawn in 1965, $267,764. 

The present book value of the fund is $78,342.56. 

WILLIAM GIBBONS RHOADS FUND 

This fund was established in 1961, by a bequest of $25,000 from William 
Gibbons Rhoads, Class of 1897, who died December 10, 1960. 

His will directed that the "income from the aforesaid gift to the Board of 
Managers of Haverford College shall be used for visits to the College by dis- 
tinguished persons in the field of the humanities and social sciences. These visits 
may be for a lecture, a series of lectures, for purposes of instruction, for seminars 
for research, or for other academic purposes. However, the income and/or principal 
of the fund may, at the discretion of the Board of Managers, be used for any 
purpose which they may consider to be of more value to the College, or the fund 
may be merged with the general endovknnent of the College and the Income or 
principal or both used toward the general expenses of the College." The present 
book value is $25,000. 

PHILIP B. AND LOUISE SPAHR DEANE FUND 

This fund was established in 1961 by gifts of $10,735, from Phihp B. Deane, 
Class of 1911 and his wife, Louise Spahr Deane of York, Pa., in gratitude for the 
scholarship help and educational opportunities made available to Philip Deane 
during his years at Haverford. 

The income from this fund, on their death, is to be used for the general 
purposes of the College. Present book value, $30,603.32. 

CLASS OF 1911 — FIFTIETH ANNIVERSARY FUND 

Established in 1961 by gifts of the Class of 1911 in celebration of their 50th 
anniversary, the income and principal are to be used for general College purposes. 
The present book value is $6,084.81. 

THE CLASS OF 1935 — TWENTY-FIFTH ANNIVERSARY FUND 

Initiated in 1960 by gifts of the members of the Class of 1935, in connection 
with their twenty-fifth anniversary, both income and principal may be applied for 
the general purposes of the College. The present book value is $7,275,67. 



41 



THE CLASS OF 1937 — TWENTY-FIFTH ANNIVERSARY FUND 

The fund was established by gift from the members of the Class of 1937 upon 
their 25th anniversary. There are no restrictions, but it was thought that a present 
need was in connection with the Hbrary and the income is currently used for this 
purpose. Present book value is $28,710.81. 

ALLEN C. THOMAS FUND 

This fund represents the gift of the residuary estate of Miriam Thomas, who 
bequeathed it to the College as a memorial to her father, Allen C. Thomas, for 
many years beloved Librarian and Professor of History at Haverford. The bequest 
became effective upon the death of Edward Thomas on November 16, 1962. It is 
unrestricted as to the use of either principal or income and has a present book 
value of $25,148.45. 

CHARLES E. CAUSE FUND 

The fund came into the hands of the College in 1964 upon the death of a life 
tenant having been created under a deed of trust of Charles E. Cause, Class of 
1880. It is to be used for the general purposes of the College, and has a present 
book vake of $21,147.97. 

CLASS OF 1918 — 50TH ANNIVERSARY FUND 

This fund was established in 1968 by gifts from the members of the Class of 
1918 in celebration of their 50th anniversary, and in memory of their classmate 
Bennett S. Cooper. Principal and income are to be used for the general purposes 
of the College. Present book value is $7,107.75. 

FUND FOR GRADUATE SCHOOL 
MOSES BROWN FUND 

A trust founded by T. Wistar Brown, in 1906, as a memorial to his father, 
Moses Brown. Transferred to the College in 1916 after his death, having at that 
time a par value of $372,821.91 and book value of $318,823.56. Present book value, 
$414,248.81. The fund was created to establish a graduate course in reHgious study 
in harmony with and supplementary to the teaching and study provided for by the 
John Farnum Brown Fund. The income only is to be used; at least ten per cent of 
the total income must be capitalized each year. The unused income, if any, is like- 
wise capitahzed at the close of each fiscal year. The graduate school supported by 
the Moses Brown Fund was designated "The Thomas Wistar Brown Graduate 
School." In 1927 the former separate school was discontinued and eight graduate 
scholarships were created. 

In 1937-1938, arrangements were first made for cooperation in courses with 
Pendle Hill, a school for religious education under the care of Friends, located at 
Wallingford, Pa. 



42 



FUNDS FOR INFIRMARY 
INFIRMARY ENDOWMENT FUND 

Founded in 1911 from subscriptions totaling $9,072.55, raised among alumni 
and friends of the College. The income is used toward the expenses of the Morris 
Infirmary. Present book value, $9,653.44. 

JOHN W. PINKHAM FUND 

Founded in 1911 by legacy of $5,000 from John W. Pinkham, 1860, being 
transmitted by gift from his widow, Cornelia F. Pinkham. There are no binding 
conditions, but as she expressed an interest in the Morris Infirmary, then building, 
the Board of Managers directed that the income of this fund should be used in the 
support and maintenance of the Infirmary. Present book value, $5,059.50. 

FUND FOR HAVERFORD UNION 
HAVERFORD UNION FUND 

Founded in 1920 by gift from the former Haverford Union members of $1,000 
par value of bond at book value of $800 and $678.59 cash, and all the personal 
property in the Union from the Haverford College Union. The College assumed 
the responsibility for the care of the building First Month 16, 1920. The income is 
used toward the maintenance of the Union building. Present book value, $1,878.82. 

FUNDS FOR SCHOLARSHIPS 
THOMAS P. COPE FUND 

Founded in 1842 by gift of sixty shares of Lehigh Coal and Navigation Co. 
stock, par value $3,000, from Thomas P. Cope. Present book value, $5,257.82. The 
income only is to be used "for the education of young men to quahfy them to 
become teachers, but who are not of ability to pay their own schooling." This fund 
sustains the Thomas P. Cope Scholarships. 

EDWARD YARNALL FUND 

Founded in 1860 by bequest of $5,000 from Edward Yarnall. Present book 
value, $6,069.23. The income only is to be used for "the support of free scholar- 
ships." The fund sustains the Edward Yarnall Scholarships. 

ISAIAH V. WILLIAMSON FUND 

Founded in 1876 and increased in 1883 by gifts of sundry ground rents from 
Isaiah V. WiUiamson. Present book value, $19,817.40. The income only is to be 
used for free scholarships. The fund sustains the Isaiah V. Wilhamson Scholarships, 

RICHARD T. JONES SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Founded in 1885 by bequest of $5,000 from Jacob P. Jones as a memorial to 
his late son, Richard T. Jones, 1863. The income only to be used to sustain the 
"Richard T. Jones Scholarship." Present book value, $5,056.25. 



43 



MARY M. JOHNSON SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Founded in 1897 by bequest of $5,000 from Mary M. Johnson. Accrued 
interest before payment to the College increased the fund by $3,062.95. The 
bequest was to establish a "perpetual scholarship." The fund sustains the Mary M. 
Johnson Scholarships. Present book value, $7,013.61. 



SARAH MARSHALL SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Founded in 1897 by bequest of $5,000 from Sarah Marshall. Accrued interest 
before payment to the College increased the fund by $2,589.49. The bequest was 
to establish a "perpetual scholarship." The fund sustains the Sarah Marshall 
Scholarships. Present book value, $7,919.76. 



CLEMENTINE COPE FELLOWSHIP FUND 

Founded in 1899 by gift of $25,000 from Clementine Cope. The gift was to 
establish the "Clementine Cope Fellowship Fund to assist worthy and promising 
graduates of Haverford College in continuing their course of study at Haverford 
or at some other institution of learning in this country or abroad." The selection 
of the Fellows is made by the Board of Managers upon nomination by the faculty. 
Present book value, $22,845.86. 



ISAAC THORNE JOHNSON SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Founded in 1916 by gift of $5,000 from Isaac Thorne Johnson '81. Present 
book value, $10,279.80. The gift was to establish "The Isaac Thorne Johnson 
Scholarship to aid and assist worthy young men of Wilmington Yearly Meeting or 
of the Central West to enjoy the privileges of Haverford College." Unused income 
is added to the principal of the fund. 



CASPAR WISTAR MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Founded in 1920 by gift of Edward M. and Margaret C. Wistar of $5,000 par 
value in bonds in memory of their son, Caspar Wistar, of the Class of 1902, who 
died in Guatemala in 1917 while engaged in mission service in that country. The 
income only is to be used for scholarships, primarily for sons of parents engaged 
in Chirstian service, including secretaries of Young Men's Christian Associations, 
or students desiring preparation for similar service in America or other countries. 
A further gift of Miss Raquelita Wistar of $4,228.13, was received. Present book 
value, $11,662.39. 



44 



J. KENNEDY MOORHOUSE SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Founded in 1926 by gifts totaling $3,000, with $1,000 added in 1926, and 
$1,000 in 1928 and $1,000 in 1929 from the Class of 1900 in memory of their 
classmate, J, Kennedy Moorhouse. The scholarship provided by this fund is "to be 
awarded, whenever a vacancy shall occur, to the boy ready to enter the freshman 
class, who in the judgment of the president of the College appears best fitted to 
uphold at Haverford the standard of character and conduct typified by J. Kennedy 
Moorhouse, 1900, as known to his classmates A man, modest loyal, courageous, 
reverent without sanctimony; a lover of hard play and honest work; a leader in 
clean and joyous living." Present book value $5,155.85. 



LOUIS JAQUETTE PALMER SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Founded in 1928 by gift of $5,000 from Triangle Society, as follows: 

"The Triangle Society of Haverford College herewith presents to the Corpora- 
tion of Haverford College, a fund of Five Thousand Dollars ( $5,000 ) to be here- 
after known and designated as the 'Louis Jaquette Palmer Scholarship Fund'; 

"This fund represents contributions from the members of the Triangle Society 
of Haverford College who have been thus inspired to perpetuate the memory of 
their fellow member, Louis Jaquette Palmer, of the Class of 1894, one of the 
founders of the Triangle Society, whom they admired for his cooperative spirit 
and constructive interest in student and community welfare. The fund is placed 
with the Corporation of Haverford College with the understanding: 

"That such student shall be selected from a list of those eligible for entrance 
to Haverford College, who shall have combined in his qualifications the fulfillment 
of such conditions as apply to applicants for the Rhodes Scholarships under the 
terms of its creation, and furthermore that the student so selected and entered in 
Haverford College may continue to receive said scholarship fund throughout his 
coiurse at College, subject to the approval of the Committee, otherwise preference 
shall be given to appUcations for the freshman class; 

"That the selection of said student and the determination of the qualities and 
conditions hereinbefore mentioned shall be subject to the decision and control of 
a committee of three ( 3 ) , which committee shall be composed of two ( 2 ) members 
of the Triangle Society and the president of Haverford College, the said members 
of the Triangle Society to select and recommend the applicants and the committee 
as a whole to determine their qualifications and eligibility. 

"Finally, in the event that no student is selected by the Triangle Society or 
that a vacancy occurs, the income from said funds and any additions shall accumu- 
late as provided under the customory rules and regulations of the Corporation of 
Haverford College." 

This fund has further been added to by yearly contributions from members 
of the Triangle Society. Present book value is $18,591.13. 



45 



PAUL W. NEWHALL MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Established in 1931 by bequest of $5,045.60 from Mary Newhall in memory 
of her father, Paul W. Newhall, a Manager, 1844-48, for the establishment of a 
scholarship fund. The income only to be used for free scholarship purposes. Present 
book value, $5,045.60. 

ROBERT MARTIN ZUCKERT MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Founded in 1935 by gift of $750, $2,000 each year, 1936 to 1940, and in 1942; 
$2,500 in 1941; $1,000 in 1943; $1,000 in 1944; $2,000 in 1945; $2,000 in 1947- 
1948, $1,000 in 1949-1950, by Harry M. Zuckert, New York, in memory of his son, 
Robert Martin Zuckert, of the Class of 1936, who was killed in an accident in June 
1935. The income is to be used for scholarship and the donor said, "I should 
prefer a boy who is a native of New York or Connecticut and who now resides in 
one of those States." Present book value, $22,250.00. 

SAMUEL E. HILLES SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Founded in 1935 by gift of $5,000 from Mrs. Mina Colburn Hilles, of Orlando, 
Fla., in memory of her husband, Samuel E. Hilles, Class of 1874, formerly of 
Cincinnati, who died in 1931. This fund was created under a trust deed with 
Central Title and Trust Co., Orlando, Fla., to which annual reports are to be made. 
The income only is to be used for scholarships for worthy students who are unable 
to finance their expenses at Haverford College. Present book value, $5,017.31. 

CLASS OF 1913 SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Founded Fourth Month, 15, 1937, by gift of $3,000 from Class of 1913 for the 
endowment of scholarship aid. The income only is to be used for scholarship aid, 
to be awarded annually to a worthy student of any undergraduate class. Preference 
is to be given to sons of members of the Class of 1913 who may apply and who 
meet the usual requirements of the College. Present book value, $3,000. 

THE AUGUSTUS TABER MURRAY RESEARCH SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Founded Fifth Month 31, 1939, by gift from two anonymous friends of Dr. 
Augustus Taber Murray '85, by gifts of $20,000 par value of securities subject to 
annuity during their lives, and with permission to use principal for the annuity 
payments, if necessary. 

Upon the deaths of the two annuitants, the remaining principal shall be held 
in a fund, the "Income to be used for scholarships in recognition of the scholarly 
attainments of Augustus Taber Murray, a distinguished alumnus of Haverford 
College, of the Class of 1885, and for many years a professor of Leland Stanford 
University, the fund to be known as "The Augustus Taber Murray Research 
Scholarship.' The scholarships in English literature or philology, the classics, 
German literatiure or philology ( in order of preference ) shall be awaded upon such 
terms and conditions as the College may from time to time establish to students 



I 



46 



who have received the bachelor's degree at Haverford College, and shall be 
awarded for the purpose of study in other institutions toward the degree of Doctor 
of Philosophy or such degree as may in the future correspond to that degree." 

The amount of the scholarship is to be $900 a year whenever awarded, and 
only unmarried students are eligible to hold it. Present book value, $32,541.49. 

THE CLASS OF 1917 SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Founded Seventh Month 13, 1942, by initial gift of $2,000 from the Class of 
1917, John W. Spaeth, Jr., treasurer, as a Twenty-fifth Anniversary gift. A further 
gift of $250 was made at the same time to cover the first two years of a scholarship 
of $125 per year. Preference is to be given to a son of a member of the Class of 
1917. The income only is to be used for a scholarship to the extent of $150 per 
annum. This was increased to $200 per annum in 1947-1948. Further contributions 
from the members of the Class of 1917 are to be applied in the following order: 

( 1 ) — To supplement the annual income from the principal sum of $2,000, so 
that the annual scholarship stipend shall be $150 (increased to $200 in 1947-48, 
increased to $300 in 1949-50, increased to $500 in 1952-53), or as near that sum 
as may be; 

( 2 ) — To add to the principal sum any surplus of these annual contributions 
not needed to serve the purpose of (1). Since the scholarship stipend for the years 
1942-1943 and 1943-1944 was already provided for by the additional $250 already 
contributed by the Class of 1917, the annual contributions from the class in these 
two years was added at once to the principal sum of $2,000, thus serving the 
purpose of (2) above. Further contributions have been made annually to make 
their present book value $11,200. 

DANIEL B. SMITH FUND 

Founded Tenth Month 6, 1943, by gift of $2,500 from Anna Wharton Wood, 
of Waltham, Mass., who died in 1944. This was increased Fifth Month 24, 1945 by 
a bequest of $2,500 made by Miss Esther Morton Smith, of Germantown, Philadel- 
phia, who died Third Month 18, 1942, by a further bequest by Dorothea Atwater 
Smith of $5,000 March 10, 1958. 

This fund is established by the granddaughters of Daniel B. Smith "in loving 
memory of their grandfather and his intimate association with the early years of 
the College." 

The income is to be used, in the discretion of the faculty, as an annual scholar- 
ship for some young man needing financial aid in his College course. Preference 
is to be give to a descendant of their father, Benjamin R. Smith, if any such should 
apply. Present book value, $10,000. 

SARAH TATUM HILLES MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Founded Eleventh Month 1, 1943 by bequest of $75,534.58 from Joseph T. 
Hilles, 1888, in memory of his mother "Sarah Tatum Hilles." 

The will directs that the income be used "to provide for such number of 



47 



annual scholarships of $250 each as such income shall be suflScient to create"; they 
are to be awarded by the Managers upon "needy and deserving students," and to 
be known as "Sarah Tatum Hilles Memorial Scholarships." 

It is estimated that 12 scholars can be thus provided for at present. Present 
book value, $75,534.58. 



ELIHU GRANT MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Established Second Month 2, 1944, by gift of $200 from Mrs. Elihu Grant to 
supplement the simultaneous transfer of $803.73 to this new fund from Donations 
Account, being the balance of donations made by Dr. Grant during his hfetime to 
the Beth Shemesh account, and $75 realized from the sale of some of his books. 
Mrs. Grant has made a further gift of $1,000 in 1943-44 and $2,000 in 1944-45. 
And, Grant Foundation, Inc., gave $10,000, also in 1944-45. Mrs. Grant made a 
further gift of $1,000 in 1945-46. In 1949-1950 in connection with the campaign, 
the Grant Foundation made a further gift to the College of $25,000. The fund is 
increased as a number of trusts created by William T. Grant terminate. 
With the donor's approval, the terms of the fund are as follows: 
"Founded in 1944 to commemorate the service to Haverford College of Dr. 
Elihu Grant, from 1917 to 1938, a member of the College faculty. The income 
from this fiuid is applied to scholarship assistance to students in the humanities, 
primarily those speciaHzing in the study of BibHcal literature and Oriental subjects, 
and is limited to those whose major subject has been approved by the College 
faculty. In special circumstances the income may be utiUzed to assist those working 
for a post-graduate degree at Haverford College." If conditions change, the Man- 
agers are given power to change the use of the fund. In making the additional grant 
in 1949-50, the Foundation stated that "the income from this present gift may be 
allocated as scholarship or fellowship awards by the proper authorities of the 
College to undergraduate or graduate students without restriction as to courses of 
studies." Present book value, $52,325.01. 



CHRISTIAN FEBIGER MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Foimded Sixth Month 13, 1946 by a gift of $8,000 from Madeleine Seabury 
Febiger, of Philadelphia, in. memory of her husband. Christian Febiger, Class of 
1900. 

On Third Month 18, 1949 a bequest of $9,050 was received from the executors 
of Mrs. Madeleine Seabiu-y Febiger, who died September 27, 1947, and was added 
to this fund. 

The income only is to be used in paying the tuition or other college expenses 
of worthy, needy students at Haverford College. Present book value, $17,050. 



48 



JOSEPH L. MARKLEY MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Founded 2nd Month 10, 1947 by gift of $5,000 from Mrs. Mary E. B. Markley 
of Ann Arbor, Michigan, widow of Joseph L. Markley, A.B. '85, M.A. '86, who was 
professor of mathematics at University of Michigan. The gift was made "to be held 
as an endowment fund in memory of Joseph L. Markley of the Class of 1885, the 
income of which is to be granted each year, in the discretion of the faculty, as a 
scholarship to some student on the basis of character, scholarship and financial 
need." 

JOSEPH C. AND ANNE N. BIRDSALL SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Founded 2nd Month 24, 1947 by initial gift of $10,000 from Dr. Joseph C. 
Birdsall, Class of 1907, of Haverford, Pa., "for the establishment of a new fund to 
be known as Joseph C. and Anne N. Birdsall Scholarship Fund, the income only 
to be granted each year, in the discretion of the faculty of Haverford College, as 
scholarship aid to some student or students of Haverford College who are preparing 
for medicine — the selection to be upon the basis of character, scholarship and 
financial need." Further gifts 1947-48, $5,000; 1948-49, $5,000; 1949-50, $5,000; 
1956-57, $5,000. Present book value, $30,000. 



DANIEL E. DAVIS, JR. MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Founded by gifts made First Month 20 and Second Month 17, 1948, totaling 
$3,000, by Mr. and Mrs. Daniel E. Davis, of Sewickley, Pa., to establish the Daniel 
E. Davis, Jr. Memorial Fund, in memory of their son, ex Class of 1944, who was 
killed in aerial warfare in the Pacific. 

The income from the fund is to be granted each year, in the discretion of the 
faculty, as a scholarship to some student on the basis of character, scholarship and 
financial need. 



JONATHAN M. STEERE SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Founded Twelfth Month 28, 1948 by gift of $2,300 from Jonathan M. Steere, 
Class of 1890. Classified among the Scholarship Funds and included in Consolidated 
Investment Account. 

The donor's provisions governing the use of the fund are as follows: "With 
this stock, or its proceeds, I wish to estabhsh a fund for a scholarship primarily 
for a graduate of Moses Brown School, Providence, R. I., now under the care of 
New England Yearly Meeting of Friends. Should the scholarship not be awarded 
in any one year to a graduate of Moses Brown School, it may be awarded to some- 
one else, preferably from New England, in the discretion of the College. If advis- 
able, it may be given to more than one boy in any year. My preference is that it be 
awarded to a member of the Society of Friends, but I do not so restrict it. Should 



49 



the time come when, for any reason, scholarships may not be needed or desirable, 
having full confidence in the management of the College, I wish that both the prin- 
cipal and the income be used as the College in its sole discretion shall determine. 

"I suggest that at the College it be known as the 'Moses Brown School Scholar- 
ship', and at the School as the 'Haverford Scholarship'." A fiirther gift of $4,985 
was made in 1949-50 and $2,715 in 1950-51. 

Upon his death on September 21, 1958, $10,000 was added by bequest to the 
fund making the present book value $20,000. 

WILLIAM GRAHAM TYLER MEMORIAL 
SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Founded Tenth Month 1949 by gift of $15,000 from Miss Mary Graham Tyler 
in memory of her father, William Graham Tyler, Class of 1858. Formerly of 
Philadelphia, William Graham Tyler took an active part in civic improvement in 
New Jersey and in Iowa, and was concerned with the advancement of Friends 
Education at both William Penn College and Haverford College. 

The income from the fund is to be granted each year, in the discretion of the 
College, as scholarship aid to some student or students on the basis of character, 
scholarship, and financial need. Preference is to be given to students from Oskaloosa, 
Iowa, or William Penn College in that state. 

1890 MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Founded in March 1950 by a gift from Andrew L. Lewis of Worcester, 
Pennsylvania, in memory of his father, John F. T. Lewis, of Class of 1890, "and in 
recognition of his father's friendship with the members of his class." 

The income from this fund is to be awaded as a scholarship by the College 
to a deserving student. Since in the beginning the income from this fund will not 
be large enough to furnish an entire scholarship it may be used in conjunction 
with some other scholarship to insure aid of material size. Increased by $100 in 
1951-52, and $100 in 1952-53 and $100 in 1961-62. Additional gifts of Andrew L. 
Lewis in 1963-64 of $500; 1964-65, $1,000 and 1966-67, $500. Present book value, 
$4,800. 

1949 CAMPAIGN SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Founded Sept. 1, 1950 by a transfer of $38,610 from the receipts of the 1949 
Haverford campaign for additional endowment. 

The income is to be used to increase funds available for scholarships, in order 
to maintain the quality and increase the diversity of the student body and to carry 
on the tradition that personal merit rather than ability to pay is the primary 
entrance quaUfication. 

Until otherwise ordered by the Board 10% of the income is to be capitalized 
each year; provided that this shall not reduce the yield from the fund below 4%. 

A portion of the capital of this fund may be expended at the discretion of 
the Board of Managers in accordance with the policy stated in the campaign appeal. 
Present book value, $52,651.66. 



50 



MAX LEUCHTER SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

The plan for this fund was evolved during the life of Max Leuchter, who died 
in 1949, and carried out upon his death by his wife Cecila P. Leuchter and his 
sons, Ben Z. Leuchter and Joel C. Leuchter. Self educated after completion of grade 
school, becoming editor and publisher of the Vineland Times Journal, Max Leuchter 
wished to benefit the College to which he sent his son, and which he had come to 
greatly admire. 

The piurpose of the donors in making this gift in 1950 of $10,000 was to 
"create a scholarship which shall be given yearly to a student whose need can be 
demonstrated, whose academic performance meets the College requirements, and 
who, in addition, gives promise of making an outstanding contribution to the life 
of the College through his breadth of interest, his love of hard play and of hard 
work." 

The scholarship shall be in the amount of $300 in the beginning. It may be 
given to a new student each year or to one student through each of his four years. 
All income received above $300 shall be capitaUzed each year. 

"When the income from the fund reaches proportions such that an additional 
scholarship of $300 can be awarded, and that at the same time at least $300 can 
be returned to the fund, the adchtional award shall then be made. 

"It is the further wish of the donors that, while their interests are primarily 
as stated above, should the Board of Managers of the College be faced with circum- 
stances which cannot be foreseen now, the Board may, at its discretion, use the 
income from the fund for College purposes other than the scholarship pm-poses." 
The present book value is $17,282.07. 

A. CLEMENT WILD SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Founded in 1951 by a first gift of $4,087.50 of Gertrude T. Wild in memory of 
her husband, A. Clement Wild, of the Class of 1899. The income from the fund 
is to be used for a scholarship or scholarships, to be granted without restrictions in 
the discretion of the College. 

In making the gift the donor, though reiterating the freedom from restrictions, 
expressed the feeling that as A. Clement Wild was born in England, becoming a 
naturalized American citizen, a grant to an English exchange student or someone 
in a similar category would be appropriate. Increased by $4,625 in 1951-52; $4,300 
in 1952-53; in 1953-54 $4,100; in 1954-55 $5,300; and in 1955-56 $2,587.50. The 
present book value is $25,000. 

CAROLINE CHASE SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Founded December 10, 1951 by payment on a bequest of part of the residue 
of the estate of Caroline Chase, daughter of Thomas Chase, one time president of 
the College, of Providence, Rhode Island, whose will provided: 

"This gift is made as an expression of my father's enthusiastic appreciation 
for its high standards of scholarship in Greek, Latin and English literature. 

"It is my intention that the said share given to said Haverford College shall 



51 



be used for any of the educational purposes of said College according to the 
discretion of the president of the time being." 
Present book value of the fund is $6,245.11. 

ROY THURLBY GRIFFITH MEMORIAL FUND 

Founded in 1953 by a legacy of $5,000 from Grace H. Griffith, who died 
April 14, 1952, in memory of Roy Thurlby Griffith, Class of 1919. "The income 
therefrom to be used for a scholarship or scholarships for such individual or indi- 
viduals as in the judgment of the trustees of said College shall be deserving of the 
same. The trustees of said College shall have full power and discretion to determine 
the number of scholarships, the amount of such scholarships, and the recipients of 
the same, but it is my desire that wherever possible preference shall be given to 
boys who have no father and who are in need of financial assistance." Present book 
value, $5,000. , 

CLASS OF 1904 SCHOLARSHIP FUND I 

Founded June 4th, 1954 in commemoration of its fiftieth anniversary by the 
Class of 1904 and the families of its decreased members, the fund is to be used for 
scholarship purposes and has a present book value of $10,000. 

INAZO NITOBE SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Founded in 11th Month 1955 by a bequest of $10,000 under the will of Anna 
H. Chace of Providence, R. I. The fund became payable upon the death of her 
sister Elizabeth M. Chace. 

"The income, or so much thereof as said College may deem best, (is) to be 
used and applied for the education at said Haverford College of a Japanese student 
who shall be a resident of Japan at the time of his appointment to such scholarship 
and for his traveling expenses from and to Japan and his living expenses during the 
period he shall hold such scholarship." Present book value, $10,000. 

! 

THE SUMMERFIELD FOUNDATION SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Founded February 1956, by a gift of $1,000 from The Summerfield Founda- 
tion, and added to by additional gifts, this fund is to be added to the endowment of 
the College; the income is to be use for scholarship purposes. Present book value, 
$13,000.00. 

W. LACOSTE NEILSON SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

This fund was estabfished in June 1957 by the family and friends of W. 
LaCoste Neilson, Class of 1901, in his memory. 

The income is to be used for the payment of one or more scholarships at the 
discretion of the College, preference if possible being given to students taking 
scientific or practical courses rather than those in the field of the arts. The present 
value of this fund is $12,575. 



52 



/ WALTER R. FARIES SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

/ Founded in 1959 by a gift of securities from Walter R. Faries, Class of 1916, 
the fund is to be administered in accordance with an agreement with the donor. 
Upon the death of certain annuitants "all income thereafter shall be used to 
provide partial or full scholarships for future students at Haverford with the 
understanding that leadership qualities rather than scholastic ability alone shall be 
considered as far as practicable in making such award. If changing circumstances 
in years to come shall, in the judgment of the Roard of Managers of Haverford 
College, make the original purpose of this fund impracticable or undesirable, such 
Board shall have the power to use the income for other purposes of the College." 
Present book value, $85,868.27. 

RUFUS MATTHEW JONES SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Founded Twelfth Month 23, 1959, by gifts of $1,500 from Clarence E. Tobias, 
Jr. of Cynwyd, Pennsylvania, as a testimonial to Rufus Jones and in gratitude for 
"the excellent educational facilities Haverford provided for me and my son," the 
principal and income of this fund are to be used for scholarships or loans to students 
majoring in philosophy. Preference is to be given to seniors. The recipients will be 
selected by the chairman of the Philosophy Department in consultation, if he desires, 
with his departmental associates and in accord with the usual scholarship practice 
of the College. The donor welcomes additions to the fund from anyone who might 
be interested. 

If changing circumstances in future years make it advisable, the provisions for 
use of this fund may be changed by the Board of Managers on the recommendation 
of the president of the College and the chairman of the Department of Philosophy. 
The present book value is $2,000. 

CLINTON P. KNIGHT, JR. NEW ENGLAND SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

This fund was established in 1961 by a gift of $5,465.98 from the Haverford 
Society of New England, representing accumulated contributions from its members 
over a period of years while they were maintaining a $500 annual scholarship at 
the College. 

By agreement of the Board of Manager, a portion of the contribution made 
during 1961 by members of the Society to the Haverford College Development 
Program was added to the fund at its inception to bring the total to $12,500. The 
income, and principal, if necessary, is to be used to maintain annual scholarships 
of at least $500, with preference to be given to a student from the New England 
area. If at some future time changing conditions make it inadvisable to continue on 
these terms, the Board of Managers shall have discretion to use the principal or 
income for other purposes. Provision has been made by the donor for additions by 
anyone interested in the purposes of the fund. 

At the request of the Haverford Society of New England, in recognition of 
the leading part played by Clinton P. Knight, Jr. '16, in the establishment and 
building up of this fund, it has been named in his honor. The present book value 
is $12,800. 



53 



GEORGE A. KERBAUGH SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

This fund was established in 1960 in recognition and appreciation of the 
leadership and personal generosity of George Kerbaugh '10, who headed the eflForts 
of the Triangle Society to provide for additional badly needed stands for Walton 
Field. 

At the time the stands were given in 1947-49 it was agreed that the income 
derived from the stands preferably would be used for improving the athletic 
facilities of the College as determined by the administration after consultation with 
the Triangle Society. Changing conditions with regard to admission charges and 
fluctuations in attendance made it so difficult to arrive at a satisfactory determination 
of the exact income which these new stands produced that it was decided, in lieu 
of the previous arrangement, to establish a second Triangle Scholarship of $700 
per annum drawn from the general funds appropriated for scholarships, this being 
equivalent of 5% income on the original investment in the stands. 

George Kerbaugh's many services to the College included his chairmanship of 
the committee which raised the funds for the Library addition built in the 1930's. 
The Board of Managers then expressed to him "its heartfelt appreciation and its 
sense of great obligation for a notable achievement." 

THE F of X SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

This fund was established by a bequest from Legh Wilber Reid, who died 
April 3, 1961, and who was the esteemed professor of mathematics at the College 
for 34 years. 

His will provides that the sum of $10,000 should be invested in a scholarship 
fund to be known as "The F of x Scholarship." Income from this fund is to be 
available "to a student entering the Sophomore, Junior or Senior class in mathe- 
matics . . . and who has completed with credit the class in Freshman mathematics 
at Haverford College, and who shall have shown a real interest in mathematics and 
gives promise for the future of his work in that subject." The present book value 
of the fund is $10,000. 

M. A. AJZENBERG SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

"Established in 1962 in memory of M. A. Ajzenberg for students planning to 
major or majoring in physics or astronomy, preferably graduates of pubHc schools 
in New Jersey or New York City." Additional gift of Mr. & Mrs. Walter Selove, 
$1,050. The present book value is $25,175. 

THE CLASS OF 1912 SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

The fund was given in commemoration of the Fiftieth Anniversary of the 
Class of 1912. 

The income is to be used for scholarship purposes, such scholarship being 
awarded preferably to an African or Asian student, but if no such recipient is 
available this scholarship may be assigned to some other deserving student. Present 
book value is $7,257. 



54 



THE CLASS OF 1936 SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Established in 1961 by the Class of 1936 as a 25th Anniversary Gift, the 
income is to be used for scholarship aid without restriction. Howeyer, the Board of 
Managers may use the income or principal for other purposes, if in their opinion 
conditions unforeseen at the time of establishment make it advisable. Present book 
value is $17,229.19. 

ARCHIBALD MacINTOSH SCHOLARSHIP FUND^ 

This fund was established in 1959 and later added to by admirers and friends 
of Archibald Macintosh, and shall be used preferably for scholarship purposes. 
Present book value is $13,217.13. 



READER'S DIGEST FOUNDATION SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

This fund was established in July 1965 by a grant of $2,500 from the Reader's 
Digest Foundation and additional grants. The income only is to be used for scholar- 
ship purposes. Present book value $10,000. 



THE JOSE PADIN PUERTO RICAN SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

This fund was established in October, 1966, by a gift from Paulina C. Padin 
in memory of her husband. Dr. Jose Padin, of the class of 1907. As both Dr. and 
Mrs. Padin had their origins in Puerto Rico, the donor desires that this fund 
should benefit deserving students from that island. The amount of scholarships, 
their number and the method of locating such deserving students is to be in the 
hands of the administration of the college. It is the principal wish of the donor 
that Puerto Rico should profit by the education of its students at Haverford 
College and that this fund should be a perpetual memorial for Jose Padin, who 
during his lifetime did so much for education in his native country. The present 
book value of the fund is $228,437.50. 



THE HOWARD M. COOPER SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Upon her death, on April 11, 1966, a gift of part of the residue from a Deed 
of Trust created by Emily Cooper Johnson, a friend of the College, became effec- 
tive. This fund is for the establishment of the "Howard M. Cooper Scholarship," 
the use of which is intended for such students as need assistance to acquire educa- 
tion, preference being given to members of the Religious Society of Friends and 
especially to those affiliated with Newton Preparative Meeting of Friends of 
Camden, New Jersey, of which Howard M. Cooper was a lifelong member. The 
present book value is $55,449.63. 



55 



ALPHONSE N. BERTRAND SCHOLARSHIP FUND 



I 



This fund came to the College as a bequest from Alphonse N. Bertrand, of 
Swarthmore, who died October 25, 1966. d 

The income only is to be used to "make non-interest bearing loans to students 
at the College who, in the opinion of the authorities of the College are of good 
intellectual promise and who are in need of financial assistance . . ." 

The present book value is $26,093.83. 

GEORGE F. BAKER SCHOLARSHIP GRANT * 

This first grant of $50,000 made in 1968 is to be used for scholarship aid 
program for students whom the College considers to have an aptitude and potential 
interest in careers in business. The principal of the fund is to be fully spent, at the 
rate of approximately Ya of the original grant each year. Expenditures may include 
financial aid to students, costs of administering the program, summer interships, 
and related service to acquaint students with business opportunities, and portions 
of staff time costs included in the operation of the program. It is expected that 
additional grants will be made each three years for at least three grants, and 
possibly four. Earned interest is to be applied to the fund. Reports are to be made 
annually to the Trust. 

FUNDS FOR THE LIBRARY 
ALUMNI LIBRARY FUND 

Founded in 1863 by contributions from the alumni and other friends of the 
College. In 1909 the unexpended balance (about $5,000) of a fund of $10,000 
raised in 1892, and known as the "New Library Fund," was merged into the 
Alumni Library Fund. 1966 additional gift from an anonymous donor of $10,000. 
Present book value, $27,435.06. The income is used for binding and miscellaneous 
expenses of the Library. 



MARY FARNUM BROWN LIBRARY FUND 

Founded in 1892 by gift of $20,000 from T. Wistar Brovra, executor of the 
Estate of Mary Farnum Brown. Additions were made by T. Wistar Brown in 1894, 
$10,000 for a lecture fund, and in 1913, $20,000. In 1916, after T. Wistar Brown's 
death, there was added to this fund $34,499.78 par value of securities, book value, 
$30,149.78, being a trust which he had created for this purpose in 1908 and to 
which he had made additions in subsequent years. Present book value, $70,618.30. 
The purpose of this fund (except $10,000) is for the increase and extension of the 
Library. The income only is to be used for the purchase of books, and one-fifth of 
same is to be spent for books promoting the increase of Christian knowledge. The 
books purchased with the income of this fund are marked by a special book plate. 
The income of $10,000 of the fund is to provide for an annual course of lectures 
upon BibHcal subjects designated "The Haverford Library Lectm-es." Unused 
income from the fund, if any, must be capitalized at the end of each fiscal year. 



56 



WILLIAM H. JENKS LIBRARY FUND 

Founded in 1910 by gift of $5,000 from Hannah M. Jenks, widow of William 
H. Jenks. The fund was first known as "Special Library Fund," but after the death 
of Hannah M. Jenks was changed, in 1916, to "WilUam H. Jenks Library Fund." 
The purpose of this fund is that the income shall be used for the care of the 
collection of Friends' books made by WilHam H. Jenks and given by his widow to 
Haverford College, and to make appropriate additions thereto. Any income not used 
for these purposes may be used toward the geiieral needs of the Library. Present 
book value, $5,000. 

MARY WISTAR BROWN WILLIAMS LIBRARY FUND 

Founded in 1914 by gift of $20,000 from Parker S. Williams '94, as a memorial 
to his late wife, Mary Wistar Brown Williams. The income only is to be used for 
the purchase of books for the Library, preferably books coming within the classes 
of history, poetry, art, and English and French literature. The books purchased 
with the income of this fund are marked by a special book-plate. Present book 
value, $20,306.74 



ANNA YARNALL FUND 

Founded in 1916 by residuary bequest of $13,000 par value of securities with 
book value of $7,110, and one-half interest in suburban real estate from Anna 
Yamall. Additional amount under bequest was received in 1918. Present book value, 
$173,078.14. The real estate was sold in 1923 and netted the College $164,820.50. 
The bequest was made for the general use of the Library. The testatrix says, "I 
do not wish to restrict the Managers as to the particular application of this fund, 
but desire them to use the income arising from it as in their best judgment and 
discretion shall seem best, for the purchase of books and manuscripts, book cases, 
rebinding of books, and, if need be, the principal or portions thereof, or the income 
or portions thereof, for additions to the present Library building, or the erection 
of new Library buildings. I direct that all books purchased with this fund shall be 
plainly marked 'Charles Yamall Memorial' in memory of my father, Charles Yarnall." 



F. B. GUMMERE LIBRARY FUND 

Founded in 1920 by gift of $635.41, raised among the students by the Students' 
Association of the College as a memorial to Professor Francis Barton Gummere. 
The income only is to be used to buy for the Haverford College Library books on 
the subjects that he taught or was interested in. 

The Students' Association voted to raise twenty-five dollars for a special shelf 
in the Library to be known as the "F. B. Gummere Memorial Shelf." This shelf, 
with its proper inscription, holds the books purchased by this fund. Present book 
value, $635.47. 



57 



EDMUND MORRIS FERGUSSON, JR. CLASS OF 1920 MEMORIAL FUND 

Founded in 1920 by memorial gift of $1,000 from the family of Edmund 
Moms Ferguson, Jr., Class of 1920, who died at the College in his Senior year. 
The income only is to be used for the maintenance and increase of the Library's 
Department of English and American literature. The books purchased with the 
income of this fund are marked by a special book-plate indicating its source. 
Present book value, $1,002.34. 

CLASS OF 1888 LIBRARY FUND | 

Founded Sixth Month 15, 1938, by gifts totaling $5,250 from members and 
families of the Class of 1888, on the occasion of their fiftieth anniversary. The 
conditions of the gift are as follows: 

(1) A fund is to be estabUshed, to be known as "The Class of 1888 Library Fund." 

(2) The income only of this fund is to be used exclusively for the purchase of 
books for the Haverford College Library, except as noted below (in Clause 6). 

(3) The fund established now vdll be added to later by gift or bequest. 

(4) Members of the Class also expect to donate books to the Library, with the 
understanding that when such books are duplicates of books already in the 
Library, they may be exchanged for books needed, or sold, and the money so 
obtained used in the same way as the income of the fund. 

(5) All books purchased by the income of the fund (or obtained as in 4) are to be 
provided with a special book-plate to be furnished by the Class. ■ 

(6) Income from the Class -Fund or moneys obtained by sale of duplicate books 
may, when necessary, be used for binding or repair of books designated as 
belonging to the Class collection. Additional donations were made as follows: 
$500 in 1939-40; $100 in 1943-44; $500 in 1944-45 and $200 in 1945-46. 
Present book value, $6,550. 



CLASS OF 1918 LIBRARY FUND 

Founded Third Month 24, 1938 by gift from the Class of 1918 in commemo 
ration of their twentieth anniversary. The gift was $1,753.52 of which $500 was 
spent for a portrait of the late Rayner W. Kelsey, professor of history, who died 
Tenth Month/29, 1934; and the balance of $1,253.52 was used in estabUshing a 
new Library Fund, the income to be used for books. Present book value, $1,253.52. 

QUAKERIANA FUND 
Founded 1st Month 8, 1947, by gift of $600 from President Emeritus William 
Wistar Comfort '94, as explained in letter from him as follows: "In 1940 some 
alumni gave me a sum of money to buy books for myself. This I have done, and 
now there remains $600 which I vidsh to make over to the Corporation, the interest 
of which may provide books or manuscripts for the Quaker collections. As a com- 
pliment to the donors of the fund, I should like the enclosed book-plate to be 
inserted in such future purchases." 



I 



58 



MOHONK FUND 
FOR THE RUFUS JONES COLLECTION OF MYSTICISM 

Founded Third Month 21, 1949 by gifts totaHng $1,500 from members of the 
Albert K. Smiley family of Mohonk Lake, N. Y. 

The gift was made "to make possible additions to the Rufus Jones Collection 
on Mysticism in the College Library," with the further provision that "it may be 
used at the discretion of Haverford College, if the purpose for which it is intended 
should no longer be apphcable or desirable." 

The fund is classified among Library Funds, and is included in Consolidated 
Investment Account. Book value, $1,500. 

RUFUS M. JONES BOOK FUND 
Fovmded Seventh Month 11, 1949 from bequest of $5,000 through a deed of 
trust established by Rufus M. Jones during his life, "the income only to be used 
for the purchase of books on mysticism, to be added to the collection of books 
on that subject," which he turned over to the College a few years before his death. 
The fund is designated as the Rufus M. Jones Book Fund, is classified among 
Library Funds, and is included in Consolidated Investment Account. Book value, 
$5,000. 

1949 CAMPAIGN LIBRARY FUND 

Founded Sept. 1, 1950 by a transfer of $22,100 from the receipts of the 
1949 Haverford campaign for additional endowment. 

The income is to be used to increase funds with which to buy books, and 
thus maintain the excellence of the Library. 

Until otherwise ordered by the Board, 10% of the income is to be capitaHzed 
each year; provided that this shall not reduce the yield from the fund below 4%. 

A portion of the capital of this fund may be expended at the discretion of 
the Board of Managers in accordance with the policy stated in the campaign 
appeal. Present book value, $39,068.07. 

THE CLASS OF 1909 
RUFUS M. JONES MEMORIAL LIBRARY FUND 

Income from this fund, established by the Class of 1909 at the 50th Anni- 
versary of its graduation as a memorial to Rufus M. Jones, is to be used for the 
purchase of books or special reproductions of rare books, in the area of the hu- 
manities, especially in the fields of mysticism, religion, philosophy and literatvire 
as representative of the interests of Rufus M. Jones. Present book value, $2,336.47. 

RAYNER W. KELSEY FUND 

This fund was estabhshed by a gift of $1,000 from Naomi B. Kelsey, widow 
of Rayner W. Kelsey, who was for many years professor of American history and 
a curator of the Quaker Collection. It was added to by her friends. 

The income is to be used to strengthen the Library collection of books and 



59 



to promote sound scholarship in the field of American history. The present book 
value is $1,335.00. 

THE SARA AND FRANCIS PAWLING FUND 

This fund came into being upon the death of Allison B. Wesley on January 
19, 1962, a friend for many years of the Library. 

By her will she left certain of her property to establish a fund "to be used as 
the Library board sees fit." The present book value of the fund is $13,640.96. 

JOSEPH R. GRUNDY LIBRARY FUND 

This fund was established in 1963 by a grant of $75,000 from the Joseph R. 
Grundy Foundation. 

The purpose of this grant is to enable the Library of Haverford College to 
increase its collection of books and manuscripts relating to the history of Pennsyl- 
vania, particularly the southeastern Delaware Valley, which would include 
Burlington County, New Jersey and contiguous areas, with special emphasis on 
the Society of Friends and the contributions by members of that faith in the 
development and cultural life of this section of America. 

It is understood that both principal and income may be spent in carrying out 
the above purposes. Present book value, $70,600. 

CARLISLE AND BARBARA K. MOORE FUND 

This fund was begun in 1966 by gifts from Carlisle and Barbara K, Moore. 
The fund is to be used for the purchase of books for the Library. Present book 
value, $1,991.25. 

FUNDS FOR PENSIONS 
PRESIDENT SHARPLESS FUND 

Founded in 1907 by contributions from interested friends of the College, fin- 
ally amounting to $40,000. Present book value, $41,237.08. The income is to be 
used for the teachers and professors of Haverford College as the president of the 
College and his successors, with the approval of the Board of Managers, may 
decide. The income from this fund is armually transferred to the Haverford Col- 
lege Pension Fund for old style pensions, or, if not needed for pensions, is capital- 
ized in said fund. 

WILLIAM P. HENSZEY FUND 
Foimded in 1908 by gift of $10,000 from Wilham P. Henszey, donated in 
connection with the raising of the President Sharpless Fund, but kept as a sepa- 
rate fund. Increased in 1909 by legacy of $25,000 from WiUiam P. Henszey. Pres- 
ent book value, $36,758.66. The income is to be used, as in the President Shar- 
pless Fund, for the teachers and professors of Haverford College as the president 
of the College and his successors, with the approval of the Board of Managers, 
may decide. The income from this fund is annually transferred to the Haverford 
College Pension Fund for old style pensions, or, if not needed for pensions, is 
capitalized in said fund. 



60 



JACOB P. JONES BENEFIT FUND 

Founded in 1909 and increased in 1910 by proceeds of land sold for account 
of Jacob P. Jones legacy. Present book value, $68,113.78. The income is to be 
used, as in the President Sharpless Fund, for the teachers and professors of Hav- 
erford College as the president of the College and his successors, with the ap- 
proval of the Board of Managers, may decide. The income from this fund is 
annually transferred to the Haverford College Pension Fund for old style pensions, 
or, if not needed for pensions, is capitalized in said fund. 

PLINY EARLE CHASE MEMORIAL FUND 

Foimded in 1909 by transfer to the College of a fund raised in 1887 in mem- 
ory of Professor PHny Earle Chase, and amounting to par value of $4,173.04. The 
income of this fund is used, as in the President Sharpless Fund, for the teachers 
and professors of Haverford College as the president of the College and his suc- 
cessors, wdth the approval of the Board of Managers, may decide. This income is 
transferred annually to the Haverford College Pension Fund for old style pensions, 
or, if not needed for pensions, is capitalized in said fund. Present book value, 
$3,272.24. 

HAVERFORD COLLEGE PENSION FUND 

Founded in 1920 and added to since, being accumulations of income from 
the President Sharpless Fund, the William P. Henszey Fund, the Jacob P. Jones 
Benefit Fund and the PHny Earle Chase Memorial Fund, not needed for pensions. 
Present book value, $74,153.59. The income from this fund, together with the 
income from the fovu above-mentioned funds, is used for old style pensions. In- 
come not needed for pensions was capitalized until 1932. Now the old style pen- 
sions call for more than the income of all these Pension Funds. When the proper 
time comes in an actuarial sense, the principal of this fund can be used as well 
as the income for the old style pensions until they cease. 

FUNDS FOR SPECIAL PURPOSES 
THOMAS SHIPLEY FUND 

Founded in 1904 by gift of $5,000 from the late Samuel R. Shipley as a me- 
morial to his father, Thomas Shipley. Present book value, $5,248. The income only 
to be used for lectures on English literature at the College. In case of actual need, 
at the discretion of the president of the College, the income can be used for gen- 
eral expenditures. 

ELLISTON P. MORRIS FUND 

Founded in 1906 by gift of $1,000 from Elliston P. Morris, 1848. The income 
is to be used as a prize for essays to be written by students on the subject of arbi- 
tration and peace. "The Elliston P. Morris Prize" of $40 is given in each year, the 
competition being open to all undergraduates and to graduates of not more than 



61 



three years standing. 

In 1929, it was determined, with the consent of the family of EUiston P. 
Morris, that when the prize is not awarded the income may be used for the pur- 
chase of hbrary books on arbitration and peace. Present book value, $1,126.75. 

JOHN B. GARRETT READING PRIZE FUND 

Founded in 1908 by a gift of $2,000 par value of bonds by the late John B, 
Garrett, 1854. It was the purpose of the donor to ensure the permanence of a 
prize or prizes for systematic reading, which he had given for a nvunber of years. 
The prizes were not awarded from 1922 to 1939 on account of default of the 
bonds. Reorganization has resulted in 1939 in sufficient recovery of value to pro- 
vide again for this prize. Present book value, $4,197.87. 

SPECIAL ENDOWMENT FUND 

Founded in 1909 by gift of $12,000 par value of bonds, book value $11,800, 
from any anonymous donor. The income only of this fund to be used "to fiimish 
opportunity for study of social and economic and religious conditions and duties 
connected therewith, especially from a Christian point of view." The income is 
used toward the expenses of Summer Schools for ReHgious Study, which have 
been held at Haverford and Swarthmore Colleges from time to time and also for 
religious education under Friends' care. 

On Fifth Month 16, 1930, the Managers adopted the following amendment, 
made at the suggestion of the donor, now revealed to be John Thompson Emlen, 
1900: "If, however, it shall in the course of time be deemed advisable by the 
president and the Managers that the income of this fund can be used more profit- 
ably by the College for other purposes than those herewith stated, it is my desire 
that they shall act in accordance with their judgment." Present book value, 
$9,227.07. 

SCHOLARSHIP IMPROVEMENT PRIZE FUND 

Founded in 1913 by gift of $2,000 par value of bonds, book value $1,200, 
from John L. Scull '05. Present book value, $2,296.88. The income only to be 
used to establish two prizes of $50 and $45 annually to the two students in the 
graduating class showing the most marked and steady improvement in scholar- 
ship during their college course. 

ELIZABETH P. SMITH FUND 
Founded in 1915 by bequest of $1,000 from EHzabeth P. Smith. Present book 
value, $1,727. The income only to be used as a prize for the best essays on peace 
written by students of the College. 

S. P. LIPPINCOTT HISTORY PRIZE FUND 
Founded in 1917 by gift of $2,500 par value of bonds, book value, $2,546.88, 



62 



from beneficiary of the estate of S. P. Lippincott '86. The income only to be used 
as an annual history prize, which is designated "The S. P. Lippincott History 
Prize." The award is to be made on the basis of a competitive essay. In any year 
when no award is made, the income is to be used for the purchase of library books 
in the field of the unawarded prize. Present book value, $2,546.88. 

FRANCIS STOKES FUND 
Founded in 1919 by gift of $5,000 in securities, book value, $5,000, from 
Francis J. Stokes '94, in memory of his father, Francis Stokes, of the Class of 1852, 
and a manager of Haverford from 1885 until his death in 1916. The income is to 
be used for extending the planting of trees and shrubs on the College grounds. 
The wish is expressed, but not as a binding condition of the gift, that the Cam- 
pus Club should have the direction of the expenditure of this income. Present 
book value, $5,120.30. 

GEORGE PEIRCE PRIZE FUND 

Founded in 1919 by gift of $600, and increased in 1920 by further gift of 
$400 from Harold and Charlotte C. Peirce in memory of their deceased son, 
George Peirce '03. The income only is to be used for a prize, to be called the 
George Peirce Prize in chemistry or mathematics, to the student who, in the opin- 
ion of the faculty, has shown marked proficiency in either or in both of these 
studies and who wishes to follow a profession which calls for such preparation. 
Unused income in capitalized, as requested by the founders of the fund. Present 
book value, $7,674.06. 

LYMAN BEECHER HALL PRIZE FUND 

Founded in 1924 by donation of securities of par value $2,000, book value, 
$1,820, from the Class of 1898 in commemoration of their 25th anniversary of 
graduation to establish an annual prize of $100 in chemistry in honor of Doctor 
Lyman Beecher Hall, professor of chemistry at Haverford College from 1880 to 
1917. Present book value, $2,155. 

NEWTON PRIZE FUND 

Founded in 1925 by donation of five shares of General Electric Co. stock by 
A. Edward Newton, par value, $500, and book value, $1,348.25. The income only 
is to be used for "The Newton Prize in EngUsh Literature to the undergraduate 
who shall submit the best essay on some subject connected with EngHsh Hter- 
ature." In 1930, the award was changed to be on he basis of Final Honors, and in 
any year when no award is made the income is to be used for the purchase of 
library books in the field of the unawarded prize. Present book value, $1,397.75. 

EDWARD B. CONKLIN ATHLETIC FUND 
Founded in 1925 and added to in 1926, 1927 and 1929 by Frank H. ConUin 



63 



'95, in memory of his brother, Edward B. Conklin '99. Present book value, $2,400. 
The income is to be used without restriction in any branch of athletics. 

EDWARD WOOLMAN ARBORETUM FUND 

Founded in 1928 by setting aside $5,000 from proceeds from sale of 5.811 
acres of land on the southern boundary and southeast comer of the College farm, 
and added to by gift in 1951 (through 1949 Campaign) of $4,775 and by bequest 
of $5,000 from Edward Woolman, Class of 1893, who died March 11, 1960, the 
income only is to be used for the preservation and maintenance and for increasing 
usefulness and natural beauty of the Arboretum, bird sanctuary and grounds of 
the College, until otherwise ordered by the managers. The present book value is 
$14,362.75. 

WILLIAM ELLIS SCULL PRIZE FUND 

Founded in 1929 by Wihiam EUis Scull '83, by a gift of $2,000. The income 
is to be used annually, so long as the managers may judge expedient, as a prize to 
be awarded at Commencement by the faculty to that upper classman who in 
their judgment shall have shown the greatest improvement in voice and the articu- 
lation of the English language. The prize is to be known as "The William Ellis 
Scull Prize." Present book value, $2,000. 

PAUL D. I. MAIER FUND 

Founded Tenth Month 7, 1936, by bequest of $1,000 from Paul D. I. Maier 
'96, of Bryn Mawr, Pa. The bequest provides for the continuance of the Class of 
1896 prizes of $10 each in latin and mathematics, and any balance of income is to 
be used for general purposes. Present book value, $1,000. 

STRAWBRIDGE OBSERVATORY MAINTENANCE FUND 

Founded Second Month 13, 1937, from donations of $5,627.37 from members 
of the Strawbridge family, being the amount in excess of the actual cost of the 
rebuilding and reequipment of the William J. Strawbridge '94, Memorial Astro- 
nomical Observatory. The income is used for the maintenance and equipment of 
the observatory. The principal can be used for additional equipment, if so deter- 
mined by the Board of Managers. In 1938 and 1939 an astrographic camera was 
so purchased at a cost of $1,787.83. Present book value, $3,839.54. 

C. WHARTON STORK ART FUND 

In First Month, 1930, C. Wharton Stork, of Class of 1902, donated to the 
corporation Securities of a then value of $69,000 on account of a contemplated 
gift for the purpose of erecting, equipping, and furnishing an Art Museum at the 
College. Purchases were made by C. Wharton Stork of paintings, which are hxing 
in the Library. This fimd is to be liquidated and is not included in the total of 
the funds. 



64 



JACOB AND EUGENIE BUCKY MEMORIAL FOUNDATION 

Founded Sixth Month 4, 1942 by gift of $2,000 from Colonial Trust Com- 
pany of New York and Solomon L. Fridenberg of Philadelphia, co-trustees under 
the will of Eugenie Bucky, deceased (late of New York), the income only to be 
used. At the same time accumulated income of $2,000 was also donated as Bucky 
Foundation Gift, this amount to be available for use for the same purposes as the 
income of the foundation. Extracts from Mrs. Bucky's will and codicils in reference 
to the purposes of the Bucky Foundation are here made as follows: 

"The purpose or object of such a foundation or fund is and shall be for the 
encouragement of them who seek new truths, and who endeavor to free and clear 
from mystery and confusion our knowledge concerning God'; and thereby to en- 
force more eflFectively the common laws of mutual love and obUgation, peace and 
goodwill, between and among our several creeds, races, nations, and markets.^ 

"My aim, intention, purpose and object is to help in promoting piety among 
men, enlightening their ignorance and bettering their condition, by making more 
and more extensive and by spreading among the public at large not only the 
preaching but also the practicing of the words of the . . . American motto 'In God 
We Trust,' and of the . . . Preamble to the Constitution for the United States of 
America. I beUeve and therefore I aim, intend and purpose that the uplifting of 
men, women and children to the standard of life taught in the Scriptures and the 
Constitution for the United States of America is indeed the work of charity, dis- 
pels ignorance, inculcates generous and patriotic sentiments, and fits the public 
groups Eind the individual men or women for their good usefulness in the Amer- 
ican Commonwealth." 

In 1945-1946, 1954-55 and 1966-67, further gifts from the trustees were 
added to the fund. Unused income, if any, has also been capitalized. Present book 
value, $8,143.12. 

MATHEMATICS DEPARTMENT PRIZE FUND 

Founded May 20, 1943 from gifts totaling $900 of members of the mathe- 
matics faculty and others. A further gift of $125 was made in 1943-44. The unused 
income is added to principal. This capitalized the annual prizes that had been 
given by the mathematics professors for many years. 

The Mathematics Department Prizes for freshmen, $25, are awarded annually, 
in competition, by examination. Present book value, $2,644.02. 

WILLIAM T. ELKINTON FUND 

Founded Ninth Month 6, 1944, by bequest from William T. Elkinton, of Phil- 
adelphia, arising from a trust set up by him during his lifetime. The principal was 

1. Associated with the American motto "In God We Trust." 

2. Associated with the Preamble of the Constitution for the United States of America — "to 
form a more perfect union, establish justice, insure domestic tranquility, provide the common de- 
fense, promote the public welfare, and secure the blessings of liberty to ourselves and our posterity." 



65 



$2,491.50. After the death of a Hfe beneficiary, the trust provided: "to pay over, 
assign and transfer one of said equal parts unto the Corporation of Haverford 
College (a corporation of the State of Pennsylvania); the principal fund thus pass- 
ing to said corporation to constitute a part of such endowment as may be estab- 
lished at Haverford College as a fitting memorial of Friends' relief work 
abroad, which memorial 'should foster the peaceful relations of the United 
States with foreign countries by acquainting our youth with the principles of 
European governments and with international problems'; provided however, 
that if no such endowment should be established at Haverford College prior 
to the expiration of one year after the principal of the fund hereby conveyed 
becomes distributable under the provisions of this deed, the said one-third part of 
the fund hereby conveyed shall be devoted by the Corporation of Haverford Col- 
lege for such other pxu^ose as the trustees acting hereunder, their survivor or suc- 
cessor, shall designate, preferably for the furtherance of education in some form 
at Haverford College or for providing assistance in the form of scholarships to 
promote education." 

In accordance with a suggestion from President Morley, concurred in by 
Thomas W. Elkinton representing the trustees, the managers voted on Ninth 
Month 22, 1944, that "the income until otherwise directed, is to be used for trav- 
eling and other expenses in the attendance at intercollegiate conferences for dis- 
cussion of international problems by representatives of the International Relations 
Club at Haverford." The trustee further stated "as long as the activities of the 
club are closely related to 'acquainting our youth with the principles of European 
governments and with international problems,' the use of the income by the club 
would be satisfactory." 

TILNEY MEMORIAL FUND 

Founded in First Month, 1945, by gifts totaling $2,000 by I. Sheldon Tilney, 
1903, in memory of his parents, John S. and Georgiana E. Tilney. The income is 
to be used "to try to influence the student body towards a more religious viewpoint 
of Hfe." Permission was also granted by the donor that "the income may be 
used also in connection with a scholarship for students in the field of philosophy or 
Biblical Uteratmre." 

In 1945-1946 the fund was increased to $5,000, by gifts of $1,000 from 
Georgiana S. Kirkbride and $2,000 from Robert W. Tilney, sister and brother of I 
Sheldon Tilney. In 1948-49 a further gift of $250 was received from I. Sheldon 
Tilney. In 1949-50 a futher gift of $1,000 and in 1952-53 $500 was received from 
I. Sheldon Tilney. Present book value, $7,000. 

CLASS OF 1902 LATIN PRIZE FUND 

Founded Second Month 2, 1945, by gift from Class of 1902 of $142.90, being 

proceeds of sale of security formerly purchased and held by the class to perpetuate 

a Latin Prize of $10 annually at Haverford. The class had donated the income for 

this prize since 1913. An unused balance of $39 of such donations was trans- 



66 



ferred to the income account of this fund. 

CLASS OF 1898 GIFT 

Founded Sixth Month 12, 1948, by contributions totahng $6,100 from mem- 
bers of the Class of 1898 as a 50th Anniversary Gift of their graduation. The con- 
ditions of the gift were "For a period of 25 years the income only produced by 
the fund is to be used to pay the expenses of lectures at the College by quahfied 
persons on such subjects and at such times as the president of the College, with 
the advice of the faculty, may think best, including at the discretion of the presi- 
dent, conferences between the lecturers and the students. After August 31, 1973, 
the income and/or principal of the fund, may, at the discretion of the Board of 
Managers, be used for any purpose in connection with the College." Present book 
value is $6,315. 

EDMUND J. LEE MEMORIAL AWARD FUND 

Founded Eighth Month 31, 1948, by donations totaling $906.50 from mem- 
bers of the Class of 1943 on the occasion of their Fifth Reunion. The Class desired 
"to perpetuate the memory of Edmund Jennings Lee, 2nd, its sole member killed 
in the past war, and to stimulate in the College that spirit of service for which he 
was known. In 1948-1949 a further gift of $100 was received from Miss Mildred 
W. Lee, sister of Edmund J. Lee. 

"The proceeds from the invested fund shall be used to establish an annual 
award to be knovioi as the Edmund J. Lee Memorial Award to be awarded 
annually beginning in 1949, to the recognized undergraduate organization which 
has contributed most toward the furtherance of academic pursuits, extracurricular 
activities, spiritual growth, or college spirit, individuals or in the College as a 
whole during the year. The award is to be used by its recipient in continuing to 
render such service." 

THE DAVID R. BOWEN PREMEDICAL FUND 

Estabhshed in 1950 by the family and friends of the late Dr. David R. 
Bowen, who, regretting a definite lack in his own training, believed strongly that 
men preparing to be physicians should receive a basic liberal education of the kind 
offered at Haverford College. The income is to be used at the discretion of the 
president of Haverford College, to purchase books for the use of premedical stu- 
dents, pay for professional magazine subscriptions, for lecturers, or for any other 
projects closely related to premedical training. Further gifts have been made 
yearly to the fund. Present book value, $1,964.70. 

JONATHAN & RACHEL COPE EVANS FUND 

"Founded in 1952, through gifts to the 1949 campaign by the children and 
grandchildren of Jonathan and Rachel Cope Evans. The principal is to be invested 
and the income used one-half for scholarships and one-half for the purposes of the 
Rufus M. Jones Fund for Advancement of Teaching. If, however, at the expira- 



67 



tion of 25 years the Board of Managers deems it advisable to use the income, or 
if necessary the principal, of the fund for other purposes, it shall be free to do so." 
A further gift was made in 1952-53 of $500. Present book value is $15,043.62, 

EDWARD HAWKINS MEMORIAL FUND 

Established in 1953 by a gift to the College from the Class of 1937. The 
fund is given in memory of Edward Hawkins, a member of that class. 

The income to be used for the purchase of equipment required for intramural 
athletics. If such becomes impracticable, the income is to be used as directed by 
the managers. Present book value is $1,457.44. 

WILLIAM W. BAKER PRIZE FUND 

"Founded in 1954 by bequest of $500 from Mertie Gay Baker, who died 
January 31st, 1954, the fund is to be invested and the income given as a prize in 
the study of Greek. If the study of Greek at the said College should be discon- 
tinued, I direct that the income be given as a prize for the study of Latin and 
should the study of Latin be discontinued, I direct that the income be used as a 
prize in the study of ancient history or Biblical literature." 

JOHN G. WALLACE AWARD FUND 

This fund established in 1958 by a gift from John G. Wallace and added to 
annually, is to be used toward the purchase and maintenance of a best actor 
award cup for Class Night, "and the awarding each year of a silver plated repHca 
of the trophy to the recipient of the award." Present book value, $300. 

CHRISTIAN RELIGION AND THOUGHT FUND 

Founded in 1958 by a special grant from an anonymous source, this amount 
is to be used to establish a fund for purposes connected with the problems of 
Christian religion and thought. 

Until otherwise directed by the Board, the income may be used as directed by 
the chairman of the Department of Religion, and the administration of the Col- 
lege; the principal may be expended from time to time upon their recommendation 
and at the discretion of the Board of Managers for the above purposes. The 
present book value of the fund is $4,000. 

THE KURZMAN PRIZE FUND 
This fund was estabhshed in 1958 by Harold P. Kurzman of New York, to 
provide a prize for the senior who has generally performed best and most cre- 
atively in political science course work. This prize, initially established in the 
amount of $125, was given in appreciation of the benefit to Harold P. Kurzman, 
Jr. '58, from his work in the political science department. In any year when it is 
the judgment of the department that no work has been performed of suflBcient 
merit to warrant this award, the funds shall be used to purchase books in this 
field for the Library or shall be expended in other ways for the benefit of the 



i 



68 



department. Surplus income also may be used in this manner. Present book value, 
$2,784.38. 

THE SCHOLARS IN THE HUMANITIES FUND 

This fund was established by an anonymous gift in April 1962, to enable the 
College to bring to Haverford distinguished scholars in the humanities. Within 
this broad field, the administration of tlie fund is left to the president and the 
Board of Managers. In 1966, a bequest of $58,520.70 from Christine L. Hires was 
added to the fund. The present book value is $95,420.70. 

FUND FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE NATURAL 
BEAUTY OF THE HAVERFORD CAMPUS 

This fund was established in 1963 by a gift from John A. Silver, Class of '25, 
with the hope that it might be added to by others also interested in the beauty of 
the Haverford campus. The fund was increased in 1966-68 by further gifts of John 
A. Silver and bequest of Bernard Lester of $16,145.37. 

The principal of this fund shall be retained by the College in perpetual trust 
with the income therefrom to be used to preserve and maintain the beauty of the 
campus and grounds of the College: 

Through the planting of selected trees and shrubs (preferably with the guid- 
ance of a qualified landscape architect) and the proper maintenance of the Col- 
lege's present heritage, particularly specimen trees. 

By retaining or improving the natural beauty of the College's wooded areas 
and pond and the use of naturalized bulbs and plants. 

Through the well-planned landscaping of the grounds, buildings and gardens. 

Should the College establish an arboretum up to one-half of the income may 
be used in connection with its maintenance and expenses including particularly 
the acquisition and care of specimens. 

It is hoped that the income will not be used for the usual or normal care 
and maintenance of lawns, paths or grounds unless in the opinion of the Board of 
Managers it is more than sufficient to carry out the primary purposes of the gift 
as above outUned. 

The fund is subject to a life income plan and has a present book value of 
$53,755.37. 

THE CLASS OF 1964 FACULTY SALARY FUND 

The Class of 1964 fund for increasing faculty salaries was started with one- 
hundred percent participation of all the members of the Class upon graduation. 
After the fund has reached the value of $10,000, some or all of the annual earn- 
ings are to be paid as a bonus to members of the Haverford College faculty in a 
manner prescribed by the administration of the College. This fund is to provide a 
supplement to regular faculty salaries and is not to be considered as a fund from 
which these salaries are to be drawn. The Class of 1964 hopes that various foun- 
dations, alumni, and friends of the College will grant the importance of the faculty 



69 



in a good liberal arts school and generously contribute to the growth of this fund. 
Present book value, $4,266.96. 

HENRY S. DRINKER MUSIC FUND 

Established in , 1964 from gifts of his friends at the time of the opening of 
Henry S. Drinker Music Center, the income from this fund is to be used for 
special programs and items related to the music department not ordinarily in- 
cluded in the budget. In addition to the fund, many contributions were applied 
towards the cost of remodeling the William Wistar Comfort house into the music 
center. In 1966 a bequest of Sigmund Spaeth of $1,000 was received. Present 
book value, $5,005. 

ELECTRONICS RESEARCH FUND 

By a legacy of $10,000 and a portion of the residuary estate, this fimd was 
established in 1965 under the will of Bettine Paddock Blake. The fund is to be 
used "for research, study and teaching in the field of electronics, or if this in the 
judgment of the Board of Managers is not practicable, for these purposes in 
other areas in the field of physical sciences. Present book value, $23,584.60. 



OLD DOMINION FOUNDATION FELLOWSHIP 
IN THE HUMANITIES FUND 

Established by a grant from the Old Dominion Foundation, for fellowships 
to selected members of Haverford Humanities faculty for such activities as schol- 
arly research; writing, or publications, or for creative writing; for travel or study 
abroad; for post-doctoral study at a major university or intellectual center; for 
curriculum planning; or for some other activity important for the teacher's intel- 
lectual development or refreshment. 

The fund is to be expended over a period of approximately five years. Present 
book value $100,000. 

ADA STEFFEN WRIGHT MEMORIAL CUP 

The fund for this cup was donated by Willard M. Wright, Jr., Haverford '34 
and Alia Tomashevsky Wright, Swarthmore '33, as a Memorial to Mr. Wright's 
mother. It is awarded annually to that member of the Haverford College football 
team and that member of the Swarthmore College football team each of whom, 
in the opinion of the respective coaching staff^s, demonstrates the highest degree of 
sportmanship and inspirational play during the game. The present book value 
is $550. 

CLASS OF 1934 REVOLVING LOAN FUND 

Established in 1959 by gifts from the class of 1934 (100% participation) to 
the amount of $10,784, the 1934 Loan Fund, both principal and interest, is to be 



70 



used for loans to deserving undergraduates, with preference being given to incom- 
ing freshmen. The main consideration in the granting of loans is the need of the 
recipient. This fund, which at present amounts to $10,121.23, may be increased 
by new gifts. 

JOHN SHINN STUDENT LOAN FUND 

This fund was established by the Will of Ernest R. Reynolds, who died May 
19, 1966, a resident of Long Beach, California. 

The loan fund established by this bequest is named for a Quaker ancestor of 
Ernest Reynolds, who came to America in 1680 acquiring land from William Penn. 

Haverford College is to administer the fund, with any additions, "for the 
benefit of worthy students, charging said students 4% per annum on unpaid prin- 
cipal thereof, and such interest rate shall continue unless, in the discretion of the 
Trustees, the economic condition of the times warrants a greater or lesser amount." 
Both principal and interest may be used in making loans. The fund at present 
amounts to $116,684.64. 

FUNDS WITHDRAWN 
The following funds left to the College with no restrictions, have been wholly 
consimied to meet in part the corporation's share of the Building Program of 
1953-1956; Ellen Wain Fund, Henry Norris Fund, Clarence W. Bankard Fund, 
Mary Brown Fund, Emma Ridgway Comly Fund, Mary K. Comly Fund, Charles 
J. Rhoads Fund. 



71 



CAMPUS VISITORS, ISBy-BS 



COLLECTION VISITORS 

DIK VISSER 

Guitarist 

NICHOLAS NiCOLAIDIS 
Secretary General of tiie Center Union 
Party of Greece in Exile 

ALLISON NELSON and 
HARRY LEE NEAL 
Duo Pianists 



GERARD T. KUIPER 
Astronomer 

LORD CARADON 
Permanent Representative of 
Great Britain to the United Nations 

HORACE CHAMPNEY 
Member of the Phoenix Crew 



WILLIAM PYLE PHILIPS FUND 

J. FRANK ADAMS 

Professor of Mathematics 
University of Manchester, England 

BERNARD W. AGRANOFF 
Coordinator of Biological Sciences 
University of Michigan Mental 
Health Institute 

DONALD ANDERSON 
Associate Professor of Mathematics 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

MICHAEL ATIYAH 
Professor of Mathematics 
Oxford University and 
Institute for Advanced Study 

RICHARD BRAUER 
Professor of Mathematics 
Harvard University 

EDGAR H. BROOKES 
Former Senator, Union of South 
Africa Parliament 
Representing Natal and Zululand 

LORD CARADON 

Permanent Representative 
United Kingdom Mission to the 
United Nations 

SEYMOUR CHATMAN 
Professor of Speech 
University of California, Berkeley 

MELVIN J. COHEN 
Professor of Biology 
University of Oregon 

ROBERT COLES 
Child Psychiatrist 
Harvard University Health Services 

JAMES W. CRONIN 
Professor of Physics 
Princeton University 

WILLIAM M. FAIRBANK 
Professor of Physics 
Stanford University 



GEORGE L. GERSTEIN 
Associate Professor of Biophysics 
Johnson Foundation 
University of Pennsylvania 

CARL GUSTAV HEMPEL 
Stuart Professor of Philosophy 
Princeton University 

J. H. HEXTER 
Professor of History 
Yale University 

F. E. P. HIRZEBRUCH 

Professor of Mathematics 
Bonn University, Germany 

HEINZ HOPF 

Swiss Federal Institute of Technology 
Zurich 

LARS HORMANDER 
Professor of Mathematics 
Institute for Advanced Study 
Princeton 

CLYDE A. HUTCHISON, JR. 
Eisendrath Professor of Chemistry 
Enrico Fermi Institute for Nuclear Studies 
University of Chicago 

EDUARD KELLENBERGER 
Institute of Molecular Biology 
Universite de Geneve, Switzerland 

DANIEL E. KOSHLAND, JR. 
Professor of Biochemistry 
University of California, Berkeley 

LEIF KRISTENSEN 
Professor of Mathematics 
Aarhus University, Denmark 

GERARD P. KUIPER 

Lunar and Planetary Laboratory 
University of Arizona 

ARTHUR S. LALL 
Adjunct Professor of International Affairs 
Columbia University 



72 



T. D. LEE 

Professor of Physics 
Columbia University 

SAMUEL R. LEVIN 
Professor of English 
Hunter College of the City of New York 

W. N. LIPSCOMB 

Professor of Chemistry 
Harvard University 

LOUIS LIPSITZ 
Associate Professor of Political Sciences 
University of North Carolina 

OLE MAALE 
Professor of Microbiology 
University of Copenhagen, Denmark 

ALBERT H. MARCKWARDT 
Professor of English and Linguistics 
Princeton University 

JOHN C. MOORE 
Professor of Mathematics 
Princeton University 

JOHN W. MOORE 

Professor of Physiology 

Duke University School of Medicine 

EARL L. MUETTERTIES 
Research Director 
Central Research Department, D 
E. I. du Pont de Nemours Co. 

ALFRED NISONOFF 
Professor of Microbiology 
University of Illinois Medical Center 
Chicago 

RICHARD M. OHMANN 
Professor of English 
Wesleyan University 

DANIEL QUILLEN 
Associate Professor of Mathematics 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

JOSEPH RABEN 
Associate Professor of English 
Queens College of the 
City University of New York 

DONG-SANG RIM 
Professor of Mathematics 
University of Pennsylvania 



HANS RIS 
Professor of Zoology 
University of Wisconsin 

ALLAN R. SANDAGE 
Mt. Wilson and Palomar Observatories 
Pasadena 

FRED SANGER 
Laboratory of Molecular Biology 
Cambridge University, England 

HOWARD SCHACHMAN 
Professor of Molecular Biology 
University of California, Berkeley 

MICHAEL SCRIVEN 
Professor of Philosophy 
University of California, Berkeley 

JEAN-PIERRE SERRE 
Professor of Mathematics 
College de France and Institute 
for Advanced Study, Princeton 

GRACE SIMPSON 
Tutor in Archaeology 
Oxford University, England 

NEIL SMELSER 
Professor of Sociology 
University of California, Berkeley 

WILLIAM A. STEWART 
Center for Applied Linguistics 
Washington, D. C. 

HANS-LUKAS TEUBER 
Professor of Psychology 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

HIROSI TODA 
Professor of Mathematics 
Kyoto University, Japan 

JEAN-LOUIS VERDIER 
Professor of Mathematics 
University of Strasbourg, France 

AARON WILDAVSKY 
Professor of Political Science 
University of California, Berkeley 

W. K. WIMSATT 
Professor of English 
Yale University 



73 



SCHOLARS IN THE HUMANITIES FUND 



H. G. GADAMER 
Professor of Philosophy 
University of Heidelberg, Germany 

P. T. GEACH 
Professor of Philosophy 
University of Leeds, England 

GESHE GELDEN 
Tibetan Lamasery 
Farmingdale, New Jersey 

ALAN GOWANS 
Professor of Art and Art History 
University of Victoria, B. C. 

ANDREW 0. JASZI 
Professor of German 
University of California, Berkeley 



P. LAL 
Professor of English 
University of Calcutta, India 

RAYMOND H. McPHEE 
Director of Public Affairs 
WFIL-TV, Philadelphia 

ABBOT ZENKEI SHIBAYAMA 
Nanzenji Zen Monastery 
Sakyo-ku, Kyoto, Japan 

HUGH TRAVERS TRACEY 
Director, International Library 
of African Music 
Roodepoort, Transvaal 

EMILY VERMEULE 
Professor of Art 
Weilesley College 



MARY FARNAM BROWN FUND 

HEIKO A. OBERMAN 
Director, Institut fur Reformation- 
geschichte der Universitat Tubingen, 
Germany 



THOMAS SHIPLEY FUND 



HAROLD BLOOM 
Professor of English 
Yale University 



WILLIAM GIBBONS RHOADS FUND 

ROBERT PALMER 
Professor of Music 
Cornell University 



CHENG MAN-CH'ING 
Painter, Calligrapher, Poet, Teacher, 
Master of Tai-Chi-Chuan 



ACADEMIC STATISTIC 196^-68 

FULL-TIME ENROLLMENT 

Fall Semester, 1964 497 

Spring Semester, 1965 491 

Fall Semester, 1965 524 

Spring Semester, 1966 512 

Fall Semester, 1966 555 

Spring Semester, 1967 535 

Fall Semester, 1967 574 

Spring Semester, 1968 563 

Fall Semester, 1968 629 

Undergraduate Students 615 

Post-Baccalaureate Fellows 14 

COMPOSITION OF THE STUDENT BODY, FALL SEMESTER, 1968 
Students reside in 39 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the 
Philippines, and 15 foreign countries. Among these are 15 students who are 
citizens of the following countries: Argentina, Brazil, Canada (2), Colombia, 
Ecuador, Guatemala, Hong Kong, India, Japan (2), Panama, South Africa, and 
the United Kingdom (2). 

Students who are members of the Society of Friends number 5 1 , or 8% of the 
student body; and 46, or 7% of the student body, are sons of Alumni. 

REGISTRATION IN ACADEMIC COURSES 

Department ^^j. Registration (Fall & Spring Semesters) 

Fall 1968 67-68 66-67 65-66 64-65 63-64 62-63 61-62 60-61 

Astronomy 10 92 134 121 117 145 4 136 105 

Bib. Lit. (Relig.) . . 92 

Biology 206 330 308 299 249 227 226 192 205 

Chemistry 142 270 289 240 249 241 256 235 234 

Classics 60 123 215 239* 188 331 209 113 141 

Economics 168* 323* 317* 230* 203 223 233 241 280 

Engineering 20 43 41 27 46 34 43 47 58 

Englisli 370 720 642 623 656 575 644 611 701 

Fine Arts 12 

French 142 276 146 142 140 159 230 217 197 

German 113 230* 290* 287* 338 284 245 220 268 

History 191* 369* 427* 532 462 340 337 429 260 

History of Art (Bryn IVIawr) 37 59 43 39 91 71 

Mathematics 160 282 294 288 280 329 303 348 344 

Music 79 131 115 112 145 136 142 115 138 

Philosophy 252 538 366 2201/2 388 353 362 340 431 

Our students in Bryn Mawr courses with Haverford number are not included. 
**See earlier statistics for outside registrations included in Fall 1968 figures. 



75 



Department ^^^^ Registration (Fall & Spring) 

Fall 1968 67-68 66-67 65-66 64-65 63-64 62-63 61-62 60-61 

Physics 112 166 168 1871/2 171 156 159 148 145 

Political Science . . 192* 334* 275* 289* 307 230 297 309 285 

Psychology 171* 287* 246* 225 265 217 205 165 164 

Religion 151* 257 245 204 164 110 123 94(Bib.Lit.) 

Russian 58 73 80* 70* 46 52 43 43 52 

Sociology 187* 177* 128* 137* 146 157 155 174 210 

Spanish 64 106 108* 135 95 103 111 84 78 

General Courses 

Asian Studies .... 12 

Creative Writing ... 8 

Humanities 108 155 119 114 105 137 124 117 105 

Linguistics * 13* 

Physical Science .. 29 50 51 41 

Social Science .... 36 16 28 33 13 

HAVERFORD REGISTRATIONS IN OUTSIDE COURSES-FALL 1968 

BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

Anthropology 21 

Chemistry 4 

Classical Archeology 5 

Economics - (Includes 19 students in our #23 & 35) 20 

Education 1 

English 16 

French 2 

Geology 17 

German 3 

Greek 3 

History - (Includes 12 students in our #25 8. 33) 21 

History of Art - (Includes 9 students in our #21) 12 

Interdepartmental - (Includes 3 students in our Ling. #21) 5 

Italian 10 

Latin 1 

Mathematics 3 

Music 11 

Philosophy 5 

Physics 3 

Political Science i- (Includes 17 in our #33, 35, 37, 49) 18 

Psychology - (Includes 3 students in our #29, 31) 4 

Religion - (Our #21) 3 

Russian 10 

Sociology - (Our #21 & 33) 14 

Spanish 3 

Total 215 

*Our students in Bryn Mawr courses with Haverford number are not included. 



76 



UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 

English 1 Statistics 1 

Oriental Studies 3 Soutii Asia Regional Studies 1 

Total 6 



OUTSIDE REGISTRATIONS AT HAVERFORD-FALL 1968** 



Biology 13 

Chemistry 1 

Classics 1 

Economics 28 

English 17 

Fine Arts 2 

French 22 

Gertr.an 17 

History 43 

Humanities 6 

Mathematics 2 



BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

Music 9 

Philosophy 17 

Physics 1 

Political Science 18 

Psychology 15 

Religion 28 

Russian 14 

Social Science 16 

Sociology & Anthropology 45 

Spanish 8 

Total 323 



SWARTHMORE COLLEGE 



Religion 



DEGREES AWARDED MAY 28, 1968-BY DEPARTMENT 

Anthropology 1 

Astronomy 1 

Biology 6 

Chemistry 8I/2 

Classics 2 

Economics IIV2 

English 17 

French 3 

Geology 1 

German 1 

History I8I/2 

History of Art 2 

Bachelors of Arts 124 

Bachelors of Science 6 

Total 130 



Italian 2 

Mathematics 3 

Music ly-i 

Philosophy I6I/2 

Physics 5 

Political Science ZVi 

Psychology 8 

Religion 71/2 

Russian 1 

Sociology 2 

Spanish II/2 



**lncluded in Fall 1968 figures 



77 



STATED MEETINGS OF THE CORPORATION AND THE MANAGERS 
The annual meeting of The Corporation of Haverford College is held in Tenth 
Month at such time and place as the Board of Managers may determine. The 
stated meetings of the managers will be held on the fourth Sixth-day of First, 
Third, Fifth, Ninth and Eleventh months. 



Additional current, free information about Haverford College may be obtained 
by writing to Public Relations Department, Haverford College, Haverford, Pa. 
19041, or- by telephoning (215) 649-9600. 



78 



■A^'^>^¥1 



The Haverford College 
HANDBOOK 

Published by 

THE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION 

and 

THE OFFICE OF THE DEAN OF STUDENTS 



EDITORIAL STAFF 

Marcus Moore, Editor 

Herbert Massie 

Robert Ihrie 

Jeffrey Averick 

Duncan Hamilton 

Joel Cook 




HAVERFORD, PENNSYLVANIA 

1967-1968 



A Message from 
The Editor 



The purpose of the Haverford Experience is to open your eyes and give 
you a better view of life. This is often forgotten. Haverford can be an 
enhghtening experience for you, but only upon your insistence. 

There was once a sign on the library fence that urged, "Don't let Haverford 
be an obstacle to your education!" By this we assume the author meant 
that one should not become so bogged down with the minutia of college 
that he overlook the importance of Haverford. We are here to interact 
with people — with administrators, professors, other students — this is a 
vital part of education. There is more to be learned here than simply 
studying what has been written. People around you say and do and need 
things that should effect you, and you will say and do and need things. 

The myth of the small college needs be here sUghtly exploded. Haverford 
can be no more than Berkeley with a limited course offering. Student- 
faculty relations must begin with the student, or one stands the chance of 
foregoing that experience. One must also always remember to look beyond 
his circle of friends without preconception, without misunderstanding all 
he sees. One must try to put vitality into all he does or find himself sulking, 
impotent at every turn. 

The gist of this message is that you are the most important factor in your 
education and must assume an active role or miss the larger portions of 
learning. 

Don't let anything be an obstacle to your education. 

Marcus Moore 




Living is easy with eyes closed 



Misunderstanding all you see 



JOHN LENNON 



I 



Student Government 



) 




Topic Page 

The Students' Association 2 

Students' Council 2 

Students' Council Committees 2 

Alumni Committee 2 

Art Series Committee 2 

Big Brother Committee 2 

Calendar Committee 2 

Class Night Committee 2 

Collection Committee 2 

Course Evaluation Committee 2 

Cultural Committee 3 

Customs Committee 3 

Expansion Committee 3 

Final Examinations Committee 3 

Food Committee 3 

Honor System Committee 3 

Fifth Day Meeting Committee 3 

Policy Committee 3 

Social Committee 4 

Students on Faculty Committees 4 

Campus Organizations 4 

A.I.E.S.E.C 4 

Haverford College Varsity Marching Society 

and Auxiliary Fife, Drum, and Kazoo Corps 4 

Brass Ensemble 4 

Chess Club 4 

Drama Club 4 

Glee Club ■ 4 

Modern Dance Club 5 

Haverford News 5 

Orchestra 5 

Record 5 

Revue 5 

Sailing Club 5 

Schuetz Singers 5 

Social Action Committee 5 

Varsity Club 5 

WHRC 5 

Phi Beta Kappa (Honorary) 6 

Triangle and Beta Rho Sigma (alumni social) 6 

Constitution of the Students' Association 

of Haverford College 6 

1 



STUDENT GOVERNMENT 



THE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION 

The idea of student self-government is basic to the 
goals of a Haverford education. Consequently, the 
College has granted the right of self-government to the 
Students' Association, to which all students belong. A 
nominal characteristic of many campuses, the student 
self-government is an actuality preserved by the ideal 
of student responsibility for the college community. 

STUDENTS' COUNCIL 

The Students' Council is the executive body of the 
Students' Association, and is impowered by the Asso- 
ciation to execute regulations legislated by the 
Association, supervise all extra-curricular activities 
other than athletics, and generally conduct the affairs 
of the student body. 

There are sixteen members of the Students' Coun- 
cil, whose officers are elected by the student body, 
and whose class representatives are elected by class. 
The 1967-68 members are: 

President Eugene Ludwig '68 

Secretary Joel Cook '69 

Treasurer Paul Weckstein '69 

Thomas Currie '68 David Cross '70 

Stephen Faust '68 Steven Erb '70 

Gregory Wilcox '68 James Faust '70 

Jack Geise '69 Bennett Schotz '70 

Edward Hehne '69 

The four Council members from the Class of 1971 
will be elected early in the fall semester. 

STUDENTS' COUNCIL COMMITTEES 

To assist in the function of student government. 
Students' Council each year appoints conmiittees. In 
most cases, committee appointments are made by 
Council from sign-up lists posted on the Founders 
bulletin board. This aUows any interested student to 
take an active part in some aspect of student govern- 
ment. The primary committees for 1967-68 are as 
follows. 

Alumni Committee 

This coirmiittee will be concerned with keeping 
Haverford alumni aware of what is happening at the 
college. This will take the form of newsletters, ar- 
ranging for student speakers to Alumni Associations, 




and possibly some ties with the Admissions Office. 
Rogeho Williams, '69, Chairman. 

Art Series Committee 

This student-faculty committee selects the attrac- 
tions for the annual Art Series. Their selections are 
intended to cater to a broad spectrum of interests, as 
is indicated by last year's series which included, 
among others, the Moscow Chamber Orchestra, Dick 
Gregory, Stan Getz, Josh White, Jr., and Ali Akbar 
Khan. Mitchell Freedman, '68, Chairman. 

Big Brother Committee 

This committee plays a major role in freshman 
orientation. Freshmen receive one of their first im- 
pressions of the college from the letters written them 
by their Big Brothers. The work of the committee is 
twofold, consisting in coordinating the letter-writing 
procedure and in evaluating its success. Donald Hart, 
'68, Steven Lewis, '68, and Timothy Welles, '68, 
Chairmen. 

Calendar Committee 

During the past few years the students, faculty, 
and administration have been giving continued study 
to ways to improve the academic calendar. This com- 
mittee shares in this continued effort, conducts 
opinion polls, and represents student preferences in 
calendar matters. Jeffrey Allen, '70, Chairman. 

Class Night Committee 

Ihis committee organizes and conducts the impor- 
tant annual Class Night Program, which is scheduled 
for February 29 and March 1 this year. Each class 
writes and produces a short play, usually about cam- 
pus life and its "humor". Occasionally, the faculty 
will throw in their digs too. All proceeds to scholar- 
ships. 

Collection Committee 

The main task of this joint student-faculty com- 
mittee is to compile a Ust of preferred topics and 
speakers for Tuesday morning Collections. The com- 
mittee also has the honor of hosting and dining with 
Collection speakers while they are on campus. Robert 
Gifford '68, and James Turner, '68, Student Chair- 
men. 

Course Evaluation Committee 

At the end of each semester, students are asked by 



STUDENT GOVERNMENT 



this committee to fill out a Course Evaluation 
Questionnaire for each of their courses. The results 
of this questionnaire are compiled and published in 
booidet form. Thus, this committee is very useful in 
helping students plan their educational program. 
Andrew Dunham, '69, Chairman. 

Cultural Committee 

This committee works in conjunction with the 
Bryn Mawr College Arts Council to arrange cultural 
activities both on and off the campus. In addition, 
"CULTURAL BROADSIDES", a monthly leaflet 
listing coming cultural events in the Philadelphia and 
New York areas is published. Also arranged are 
special low student prices for area cultural attractions, 
as well as occasional theatre parties. David Marshall, 
'69, Chairman. 

Customs Committee 

One of the unique aspects of Haverford is that 
freshman orientation (Customs Week) is entirely 
planned and carried out by students. The Customs 
Committee is responsible for Customs Week, a pro- 
gram to acquaint freshmen and transfer students with 
the programs and traditions of Haverford, notably in 
the areas of academics and the Honor System. This 
week also affords ample opportunities for the fresh- 
men to become acquainted with the upperclassmen 
on the committee, with other members of their class, 
and, via mixers, with nearby women's schools. 

Mitchell Freedman, '68, Co-chairman 
Marcus Moore, '68, Co-chairman 



Douglas Bennett '68 
Carl Grunfeld '68 
Steven Bailey '69 
Edmund Chaney '69 
David Foster '69 
Peter Garretson '69 
Henry Harris '69 
Peter Johnstone '69 
Christopher Lane '69 
John Laurence '69 
Gregory Sava '69 
Robert Stern '69 
Dennis Stern '69 



Vincent Trapani '69 
Robert Anderman '70 
Jeffrey Averick '70 
Joseph Bomba '70 
Daniel Gordon '70 
Duncan Hamilton '70 
Robert Ihrie '70 
Herbert Massie '70 
Wilham MOes '70 
George Newman '70 
Charles Shields '70 
Philip Tramdack '70 
Bradley Wolfe, '70 



Expansion Committee 

Haverford is going through a period of great 
development. This committee has an extremely im- 



portant task in assessing students' needs and opinions 
within areas of campus physical and educational 
expansion, development, and refinement. Via this 
group, students are assured of exerting an influence 
on the directions of expansion. Edward Helme, '69, 
Chairman. 

Final Examinations Committee 

Haverford's system of self-scheduled final examina- 
tions is unique. This system, initiated by students, 
is designed to reduce the pressures of the final exam 
period. This committee acquaints the freshmen with 
the details and implications of the exam system, and 
administers final examinations. Stephen Faust, '68, 
Chairman. 

Food Committee 

This committee makes suggestions for the im- 
provement of food and food service, and is the 
medium through which student expression of likes 
and dislikes in these areas, as well as suggestions for 
improvement, are made. Herman Berliss, '70, Chair- 
man. 

Honor System Committee 

The work of this committee encompasses the most 
important part of Haverford campus life, the Honor 
System. This committee publishes the Honor System 
booklet sent to freshmen and is involved in main- 
taining student awareness of the system. Part of the 
task of this year's committee will be to work with 
the Student Affairs Committee of the Board of 
Managers in studying the effects of the recent Honor 
System changes. James Faust, '70, Chairman. 

Fifth Day Meeting Committee 

This committee is concerned with making Fifth 
Day Meeting an important part of campus life. Be- 
cause of the nature of Meeting, the committee's work 
is necessarOy concerned with the future of the 
Quaker tradition at Haverford. Thomas Currie, '68, 
Chairman. 

Policy Committee 

This committee is very much concerned with the 
aims and goals of Haverford College. As a result, its 
work will overlap that of several other committees, 
including Honor System, Expansion, and Meeting. 
Douglas Bennett '68, and Thomas Layman '68, 
Chairmen. 



STUDENT GOVERNMENT 



Social Committee 

The Social Committee has a broad responsibility 
for the social climate of the campus. Its prime con- 
cerns revolve around planning and carrying out co- 
educational programs, including mixers, dances, par- 
ties, and plans for Festive Weekends (in conjunction 
with host classes). Its membership includes, among 
others, the class presidents. Galen Bollinger, '68, and 
Stephen Faust, '68, Chairmen. 

STUDENTS ON FACULTY COMMITTEES 

The students at Haverford are fortunate in being 
represented on all faculty committees. Because of 
the special nature of such positions, appointments 
are made by the Students' Council, subject to the 
approval by the committee itself. 

CAMPUS ORGANIZATIONS 

Campus organizations are recognized and support- 
ed by the Students' Council. Most of the financial 
support for these organizations is appropriated by the 
Students' Council from a portion of the unit fee 
designated for use by the Students' Association. 

All student organizations, in order to be officially 
recognized by the College, and to be eligible for unit 
fee appropriations, must be recognized by the Stu- 
dents' Council. New organizations must perform a 
function for the College not already being carried 
out, cannot be honorary or social in nature, and 
cannot be exclusive in membership. Students wishing 
to establish new organizations are invited to discuss 
their ideas with the Students' Council for aid in 
meeting the general criteria for recognition. 

A.I.E.S.E.C. 

The Haverford-Bryn Mawr local committee of the 
AIESEC (Association Internationale des Etudiants 
en Sciences Economiques et Commercials) provides 
students interested in business and economics with 
an opportunity for practical business training through 
a summer exchange program with businesses in 
foreign countries. Robert Fried, '69, President. 

Haverford College Varsity Marching Society 
and Auxiliary Fife, Drum, and Kazoo Corps 

The raison d'etre for this long-titled and short 
disciplined seasonal assemblage is to increase the 



spirit of the student body, and to provide students 
with the opportunity to use whatever musical talents 
they may have, and to let off a little "steam" on 
certain traditional occasions. To do all this it appears 
at pep rallies, occasional home football games, aU 
Swarthmore games, and a few other select occasions. 
A leader will emerge early in the fall, and appeals for 
members will soon follow. 

Brass Ensemble 

The Brass Ensemble concentrates on music for 
brass from the Baroque and present day eras. This 
group sometimes serves as in instrumental back-up 
for choral groups. They also perform on special 
occasions as well as during regular Orchestra concerts. 

The Chess Club 

The Chess Club resembles a varsity sport. Matches 
are regularly scheduled with nearby schools. There is 
also a tournament scheduled among the members. 
Those interested should contact WiUiam Balch, '68, 
or John Gregg, '69. 

The Drama Club 

In cooperation with the Bryn Mawr College 
Theatre, the Drama Club presents three major pro- 
ductions annually, alternating between Bryn Mawr 
and Haverford stages. In addition, Drama Club pre- 
sents several student directed and some student 
written plays, under the auspices of Little Theatre. 
Last year's major productions were The Winter's Tale, 
The Caucasian Chalk Circle, and The Haunted House. 
The Little Theatre productions were Thurber's Car- 
nival, and an evening of student-written one-act plays. 
Special events were a student-alumni production of 
A Phoenix Too Frequent and a play exchange with 
Swarthmore College Little Theatre Club. Medea has 
been tentatively chosen as the first major production 
of 1967—68. Major productions are under the direc- 
tion of resident director, Robert Butman. E. Christian 
Kopff, '68, President. 

The Glee Club 

The Glee Club gives a number of concerts at Haver- 
ford and at leading women's colleges during the year. 
Under the direction of Dr. William Reese, the Glee 
Club last year performed Honnegger's King David and 
Handel's Alexander's Feast among other programs. 
During the coming year, the Club will present joint 
performances with Wheaton, Beaver, and Vassar 



STUDENT GOVERNMENT 



Colleges. Rehearsals are scheduled twice weekly and 
membership is open to all students who can qualify. 
Peter Reagan, '68, President. 

The Modern Dance Club 

This organization, formed just last year, gives its 
members the opportunity to study and perform mod- 
ern dance. Its activities are held in close conjunction 
with the Bryn Mawr College Modern Dance Club. 
Last year the Club performed in the Drama Club's 
production of The Winter's Tale, a Christmas Concert, 
a spring concert, and at a master class taught by the 
director of the Bryn Mawr Dance Club, Mrs. Paula 
Mason. All interested persons, regardless of previous 
experience, should contact Bert Kritzer '69. 

The Haverford News 

The student news publication of the College, The 
Haverford News, is distributed on Fridays throughout 
the college year except during examination periods. 
Positions on the News are open to any student, with 
or without experience, interested in news, feature, or 
sports writing, as well as circulation and business. 
Dennis L. Stern '69, Editor-in-Chief. 

The Orchestra 

All students who play a musical instrument are 
invited to try out for the Orchestra. The Orchestra is 
a joint organization with Bryn Mawr and performs 
several times during the school year at Bryn Mawr, 
Haverford, and at other colleges. Occasionally, the 
Orchestra, in full or in part, will join with the Glee 
Club in Choral concerts. The Orchestra is under the 
direction of Dr. William Reese. Richard Melson, '68, 
President. 

The Record 

The Record is the Haverford yearbook, giving a 
pictorial and literary review of the year's College 
activities. Openings are available for students interest- 
ed in creative photography, writing, layout, and 
advertising. Michael McCann, '68, and Francis 
Richards '68, Editors-ln-Chief. 

The Revue 

The Revue is published twice during the school 
year. It includes the literary creations of interested 
members of the student body. John Stuart, '68, 
Editor. 



The SaUing Club 

The Saihng Club offers both Haverford and Bryn 
Mawr students opportunities for instruction in sailing, 
recreational sailing, and for sailing in inter-collegiate 
competition. Its small fleet of Tech Dinghies is 
moored on the Schuylkill River. During the winter 
months the Club offers a regular shore school for 
neophyte sailors. During the spring and fall there are 
regularly scheduled inter— and intra— club regattas. 
Robert Stavis, '69, Commodore. 

The Schuetz Singers 

This small, highly rehearsed, and talented musical 
group draws its membership from both the Haverford 
Glee Club and the Bryn Mawr Chorus. It performs at 
regular Glee Club concerts and at other selected 
occasions during the year. 

The Social Action Committee 

The Haverford Social Action Committee (SAC) 
provides an organizational structure for independent- 
ly initiated social action programs and activities. Any 
student who would like to do something about a 
particular social or political problem should talk with 
Glen Nixon, SAC president, or to any member of the 
steering committee. The steering committee wiU do 
what it can to inform the student of on-going activity 
in this area, to inform him of resources he might use, 
and to help him organize new activities if the present 
ones do not seem sufficient. SAC can be particularly 
helpful in providing funds for films and speakers. 

For individuals interested in continuing discussion 
and group action of a more general variety, there are 
two groups on campus: a group dedicated to the 
practice and principles of nonviolent action, and a 
group interested in Students For a Democratic 
Society (SDS). Both groups work through the SAC. 

The Varsity Club 

The Varsity Club works for the increase of interest 
and participation in athletics. The Club also co- 
sponsors the Varsity Weekend Dance during the tra- 
ditional Swarthmore Weekend. Those students at 
Haverford who have been awarded their "H" in a 
varsity sport are eUgible for permanent membership. 

WHRC 

WHRC, the joint Haverford-Bryn Mawr radio 
station, broadcasts at 640 kilocycles as a restricted- 



STUDENT GOVERNMENT 



radiation, carrier-current station. The station operates 
24 hours a day from its studios in the Haverford 
Union and can be received in the dormitories at both 
colleges. As well as providing musical entertainment 
of all tastes, campus news and sports are covered 
regularly. Staff membership is open to all students 
with any interest in radio broadcasting. Herbert Frey, 
'68, Station Manager. 

Phi Beta Kappa (Honorary) 

The Zeta Chapter of Phi Beta Kappa Society in 
the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania was established 
at Haverford in 1898. Its membership includes about 
650 Alumni. 

The annual meeting of the chapter for the election 
of new members from the Senior and Junior classes is 
held during Commencement Week. The method of 
election to Phi Beta Kappa is as follows: 

A weighted average of the grades for the four 
coUege years is calculated, the weights given to the 
Freshman, Sophomore, Junior, and Senior grades 
being respectively 1, 2, 3, and 4. The Phi Beta Kappa 
average thus obtained is the principal factor in 
determining eligibility as a candidate, but considera- 
tion is also given to other evidences of scholarly 
achievement and to such qualities as intellectual vigor, 
originality, respect for truth, and interest in general 
scholarship. 

The number elected from any class depends upon 
the general excellence of that class. By decision of 
the chapter at its annual meeting in 1956, the number 
elected at the end of the Junior year should not, in 
general, exceed 5% of the class. The total number 
elected before graduation from any class will, in 
general, be limited to 15%. 

Triangle and Beta Rho Sigma (alumni social) 

Triangle and Beta Rho Sigma are social groups 
which have been in existence for several decades. 
They are strictly alumni organizations which admit 
an unspecified number of Seniors to membership. 

CONSTITUTION OF THE STUDENTS' 
ASSOCIATION OF HAVERFORD COLLEGE 

Article I 

Preamble 

Section 1. Name-The name of this Association 
shall be the Students' Association of Haverford 
CoUege. 



Section 2. Membership- All undergraduates pur- 
suing studies at Haverford College are ipso facto 
members of the Students' Association. 

Section 3. Powers- All powers hereinafter defined 
derive from the Students' Association and are dele- 
gated by it to such bodies of its own creation as are 
needful to carry out the functions of student self- 
government. 

Section 4. Right of Self-Govemment— The right of 
student self-government is granted by the Adminis- 
tration of Haverford College to the Students' Asso- 
ciation provided that the Students' Association main- 
tains the standards of the College to the satisfaction 
of the Administration and comphes with the charter 
of the Student Affairs Committee. 

Article II 

Legislative Powers 

Section 1 . Regulations and Council Rules— 

1. The Students' Association shall make Regula- 
tions governing the conduct of students on campus. 
Regulations pertaining to the Honor System shall be 
enacted by a two-thirds vote of a meeting of the 
Association. Other Regulations shall be enacted by a 
majority vote of a meeting of the Association. Every 
member of the Association is responsible for enforce- 
ment of these Regulations. Should the Administration 
find any Regulation unacceptable the dispute shall be 
referred to three responsible and impartial persons, 
satisfactory to the Association and the Administra- 
tion. 

2. The Students' Association delegates such legis- 
lative authority to the Students' Council as is 
necessary to carry out the functions of the Council 
herein provided for. Such legislation shall be posted 
on prominent campus bulletin boards and shall be 
reported to the members of the Association at 
dormitory sessions, provided for in Section 2, para- 
graph 4, of this article. The Students' Association re- 
serves to itself the ultimate legislative authority to be 
exercised only in plenary session. 

Section 2. Meetings of the Association- 

1 . The Students' Association shall meet in plenary 
session within the first two weeks of each semester. 

2. The President of the Students' Association shall 
call a plenary session of the Students' Association 
whenever he deems it necessary, by posting a notice 
on prominent campus bulletin boards at least seventy- 
two hours before the time of the meeting, in which 
case a quorum shall consist of twenty per cent of the 



STUDENT GOVERNMENT 



members of the Students' Association; if the President 
considers that an emergency exists which prevents 
him from giving due notice as provided above, the 
number of students required for a quorum shall be 
forty percent of the Students' Association. 

3. Items of business intended for action by a 
plenary session of the Association shall be handed in 
writing to the President at least forty-eight hours 
before the meeting, if not an emergency session as 
herein described. The President shall post the agenda 
of the plenary session at least twenty-four hours 
before the meeting, if not an emergency session. 

4. There shall be held each semester at least one 
meeting of the members of the Students' Association 
in dormitory session. The number and size of dormi- 
tory groupings shall be determined by the Students' 
Council, but the number of groupings shall not be less 
than ten. At least one grouping shall be composed of 
non-resident undergraduates. The Council shall also 
set the times and dates for such meetings. 

5. The President shall call a plenary session of the 
Association in the manner provided for in paragraph 
2 of this section whenever he receives a petition 
signed by thirty members of the Association stating 
the purpose for which the plenary session shaU be 
called. The Council shall call dormitory sessions of 
the Association whenever it receives a petition signed 
by thirty members of the Association stating the pur- 
pose for which the dormitory session shall be called. 
Such plenary and dormitory meetings shall be held 
within seven days of the receipt of the petition. 
Nothing shall be considered at such meetings except 
the matters stated in the petition. 

6. The Haverford Rules of Parliamentary Procedure 
shall be the authorized and final guide in all par- 
liamentary procedure except wherein it conflicts 
with the Constitution of the Students' Association or 
the Regulations of the Students' Association. The 
Secretary of the Students' Association shall have with 
him at plenary sessions of the Association a copy of 
The Haverford Rules of Parliamentary Procedure. 

Article III 

Executive Powers 

Section 1 . Students' Council— The executive power 
of the Students' Association is vested in a Students' 
Council. 

Section 2. Membership of the Students' Council- 
The members of the Students' Council shall be the 



Officers of the Students' Association and the Class 
Representatives. 

Section 3. Meeting of the Students' Council-The 
President of the Students' Association shall call a 
meeting of the Students' Council at least once each 
month. A quorum of the CouncO shall consist of two- 
thirds of its members. Upon the written request of at 
least three members of the Students' Council, an 
official meeting of that body shall be immediately 
called. Legislative and executive sessions of the Stu- 
dents' CouncO, except those concerned exclusively 
with appointments and awards, shall be pubhc. The 
agenda for non-judicial Council meetings shall be 
posted on prominent campus bulletin boards at least 
twenty-four hours before each meeting. 

Section 4. Nomination of Association Officers- 
Nominations for the offices of President, Secretary, 
and Treasurer of the Students' Association shall open 
on the first Tuesday of the second semester. Nomina- 
tions shall close on the following Friday. Nominations 
for the Office of President shall be.restricted to the 
members of the Junior Class; nominations for the 
Offices of Secretary and Treasurer shall be restricted 
to members of the Sophomore Class. Should there be 
more than four (4) candidates nominated for any 
office, there shall be a primary election for that office 
on the Wednesday following the close of nominations, 
to be conducted by the preferential system. Space 
shall be provided for write-in votes. The four highest 
candidates shall then enter the final election for that 
office. 



Section 5. Election of Officers and Class Rep- 
resentatives. 

1. On the Friday following the first Tuesday of 
the second semester, the Students' Association shall 
vote by secret ballot to elect from the Junior Class a 
President, and from the Sophomore Class a Secretary 
and Treasurer. Voting shall be held according to the 
preferential system; space shall be provided for write- 
in votes. If, for any reason, more than one election is 
required to secure a valid vote, subsequent voting shall 
be called for the President within twenty-four hours 
of the previous voting. Votes must be officially cast 
by at least forty per cent of the membership of the 
Students' Association for the election to be vaUd. 

2. During the third week of the second semester, 
each class shall elect from its membership its Rep- 
resentatives to the Students' Council by a preferen- 



8 



STUDENT GOVERNMENT 



tial system of voting. The Junior Class shall elect 
three Representatives; the Sophomore Class, two 
Representatives; and the Freshman Class, four Rep- 
resentatives. The elections of the Class Representa- 
t'ves shall be conducted by the respective Class 
Officers. Votes must be officially cast by at least 
forty per cent of the membership of a class for the 
election of its Class Representatives to be valid. 

3. The President of the entering Freshman Class 
shall be a Class Representative. During the second 
and third weeks of October each year the Freshman 
Class shall elect by a preferential system three 
additional Representatives, the exact date to be set 
by the Students' Council. 

4. The Students' Council shall have final authority 
over the procedure for all elections. 

Section 6. Assumption of Office-The Council 
members elected in the manner provided for in 
Sections 4 and 5 of this article shall assume office on 
the third Sunday of the second semester. Council 
members elected at other times will assume office 
immediately upon their election. 

Section 7. Duties of the Council and the As- 
sociation Officers- 

1. The Students' Council shall execute the Reg- 
ulations legislated by the Students' Association, 
supervise all extra-curricular activities with the ex- 
ception of athletics, and perform other duties as 
herein provided. 

2. The President of the Students' Association shall 
preside at all plenary sessions of the Association and 
at aO meetings of the Students' CouncO. He shall 
conduct the election of Association Officers and shall 
certify and publish the results of said elections, 
specifying the names of candidates nominated or 
elected. Each year he shall present to the Freshman 
Class the system of student government. In the 
absence of the Secretary or the Treasurer from any 
plenary session of the Students' Association or the 
meeting of the Students' Council, the President shall 
appoint from the other members of the Council a 
Secretary pro tempore or a Treasurer pro tempore. 

3. The Secretary of the Students' Association shall 
keep in permanent form minutes of all plenary 
sessions of the Association and of all meetings of the 
Council. He shall publish or post on prominent 
campus bulletin boards the minutes of all plenary 
sessions and of all public Council meetings, and the 
results of aU closed Council meetings. If the Office of 
President is vacant or if the President is absent from 



any plenary session of the Association or meeting of 
the Council, the Secretary shall act as President pro 
tempore and appoint from the members of the 
Council a Secretary pro tempore. 

4. The Treasurer of the Students' Association shall 
disburse the funds of the Students' Association and 
shall keep a permanent record of all transactions. 
When retiring from office, he shall post or publish 
for the inspection of members of the Students' 
Association a summary of his accounts. 

Section 8. Committees— 

1. Upon taking office each new Council shall 
appoint a Rules Committee, an Honor System Com- 
mittee, a Customs Committee, a Curriculum Com- 
mittee, and a Dormitory Committee. 

2. The Students' Council shall have the power to 
appoint temporary committees whenever it deems 
such appointments necessary to aid in the execution 
of its duties. 

ARTICLE IV 

Judicial Power 

Section 1. Functions-Tht judicial power of the 
Students' Association is vested in the Students' 
Council, which shall meet in judicial session, discuss 
the matter in question, and respond with the course 
of action which it beUeves most beneficial to the 
individual and the other members of the community. 

Section 2. Penalties— The Council shall impose 
penalties within such limits as the Students' Associa- 
tion may prescribe. 

Article V 

Resignation and Removal of Officers 
and Representatives 

Section 1. Vacancies- 

1 . In the event of the resignation or removal of an 
Officer of the Students' Association, the Association 
shall immediately fill the vacancy with a member of 
the same class according to the election procedure 
specified herein. In the interim the vacancy shall be 
filled by the pro tempore replacements provided for 
herein. 

2. Should the vacancy occur among the Class 
Representatives, it shall immediately be filled by the 
class whose representation has been reduced, accord- 
ing to the election procedure specified herein. 

Section l.Removal- 

1. Any Officer of the Students' Association shall 



STUDENT GOVERNMENT 



be removed for malfeasance or neglect of office or 
other good cause by not less than a two-thirds vote 
of a plenary session of the Students' Association. 

2. The Council shall call a plenary session for this 
purpose at its own discretion or on the petition of 
thirty members of the Students' Association. 

3. Any Class Representative shall be removed for 
malfeasance or neglect of office or other good cause 
by not less than two-thirds vote of at least forty per 
cent of the members of the Class which he represents. 

Article VI 

The Honor System 

Section 1 . Standards— 

1. Each student shall be responsible for his proper 
conduct in all scholastic work. 

2. Each student shall be responsible for his proper 
conduct with respect to women guests and the indi- 
viduals comprising the Haverford College Community. 

3. Each student shall accept the Haverford Honor 
System realizing that it is his responsibUity to uphold 
the Honor System and the attitude of personal and 
collective honor on which it is based. 

Section 2. Implementation— 

1 . A plenary session of the Students' Association 
shall be held during the first two weeks of the second 
semester of each year to formulate a set of regulations 
to implement the standards of the Honor System. 
These regulations alone shall determine the conduct 
which students must observe under the standards of 
the Honor System set forth in Article VI, Section 1, 
Paragraphs one, two and three of the Constitution 
and shall appear as Article I of the Regulations of the 
Students' Association. Though the Students' Council 
may issue interpretations which will define that 
Council's understanding of specific matters pertaining 
to the Honor System, only legislative action of a 
plenary session of the Students' Association shall be 
considered in any way a part of the Regulations. 
Any violation of these Regulations shall be deemed a 
violation of the Honor System. 

2. Each entering student shall, upon his agreement 
to enter Haverford College, sign the following pledge: 
"I hereby accept the Haverford Honor System realizing 



it is my responsibility to uphold the Honor System 
and the attitude of personal and collective honor on 
which it is based." 

3. After each of his examinations each student 
shall sign on his examination paper the following 
pledge: "I accept full responsibUity under the Haver- 
ford Honor System for my conduct on this examina- 
tion." 

Section 3. Enforcement 

The student who believes that his actions may be 
in conflict with the principles of responsibility and 
respect inherent in the Honor System shall im- 
mediately discuss the matter with a member of 
Students' Council. Should a student believe that the 
actions of another may be in conflict with the Honor 
System, he shall immediately discuss the matter with 
the student concerned. If after discussion either 
student finds said actions to be in possible conflict 
with the Honor System, the student whose actions 
are in question shall bring the matter to Students' 
Council within a week. After a week the responsibility 
for bringing the matter to Students' Council rests 
with each student aware of the actions and involved 
in the discussions. 

Article VII 

Amendments 

Section 1. /Voposa/- Amendments to this Con- 
stitution may be proposed by the Students' Council 
or by action taken in a plenary session of the Stu- 
dents' Association called for that purpose. 

Section 2. Ratification- Amtnimtnts shall be 
ratified by a two-thirds vote of a plenary session of 
the Students' Association. 

Section 3. ^pprova/- Amendments shall not go 
into effect until they are approved by the President 
of the College. 

Article VIII 

Previous Constitution Invalid 

With the enactment of this Constitution all pre- 
vious Constitutions of the Students' Association of 
Haverford College shall be rendered null and void. 



The Honor System 



Topic Page 

The Honor System — introduction 12 

Constitutional Standards 12 

Honor System Regulations 12 

During Examinations ... 12 

In the Preparation of Papers 12 

In the Preparation of Written Homework and 

Laboratory Reports 12 

Responsibility for Observing Special Requirements 12 

Women Guests j2 

Honor System Interpretations 12 

Academic Interpretations 13 

Interpretations Regarding Women Guests 13 

Interpretations Regarding Final Examinations J4 

Recent Changes in the Honor System 14 

Council Statement of Purpose 15 

Statement by the President of the College 

Provisionally Accepting the New Regulations 15 

Council's Statement on the Board's Action j^ 




12 



THE HONOR SYSTEM 



THE HONOR SYSTEM - INTRODUCTION 

The Honor System enables students to have certain 
privileges that they otherwise would not enjoy. With 
the acceptance of these freedoms comes a responsi- 
bility for each individual to maintain the System's 
social and academic standards. It is not necessary 
that one's own sense of honor be in agreement with 
that implied or stated in the Honor System; the stu- 
dent's obhgation is bound by the Honor System 
whenever it applies to his actions. 

THE HONOR SYSTEM - 
CONSTITUTIONAL STANDARDS 

1 . Each student shall be responsible for his proper 
conduct in all scholastic work. 

2. Each student shall be responsible for his proper 
conduct with respect to women guests and the in- 
dividuals comprising the Haverford College Com- 
munity. 

3. All scholastic conduct and conduct involving 
women guests on campus is covered by Article VI, 
Section 3, Enforcement. Students are expected to 
resolve conflicts which involve only members of the 
Haverford College Community by discussion among 
themselves. If unable to resolve the conflicts, students 
may bring the matter to the Students' Council. 

4. Each student shall accept the Haverford Honor 
System realizing that it is his responsibility to uphold 
the Honor System and the attitude of personal and 
collective honor on which it is based. 

HONOR SYSTEM REGULATIONS 
During Examinations 

1 . No student shall give or receive aid. 

2. No person shall act as an official proctor. 

3. Students shall obey all restrictions which the 
professor may prescribe as to time, place, and 
material aids to be used. 

In The Preparation of Papers 

1. A student shall never represent another per- 
son's ideas or scholarship as his own. He shall indicate 
his sources by using, where appropriate, quotation 
marks, footnotes, and a bibliography. 

2. Professors may: 

a) require that a paper not be proofread by 
others. 



b) prescribe limitations on the sources to be 
used. 

c) waive any requirements concerning the 
crediting of sources. 

3. Permission must be obtained in advance from 
all professors concerned if a paper is to be submitted 
for credit in more than one course. 

In the Preparation of Written Homework 
and Laboratory Reports 

1. Students may work together, provided that 
each member of the group understands the work 
being done. 

2. All data must be reported by the student as 
observed in his experiment. 

3. Professors may; 

a) require that secondary sources consulted 
be credited. 

b) waive any restrictions in 1 and 2 of this 
paragraph. 

Responsibility For Observing Special Requirements 

A student is responsible for observing any re- 
quirements which the professor announces under the 
option specified above. 

Women Guests 

1. Any act involving women guests which fails to 
show proper respect for women guests and/or in- 
dividuals who comprise the Haverford College Com- 
munity shall be brought to the attention of a member 
of Students' Council. 

2. Students are expected to exercise good judg- 
ment as to a reasonable hour of departure of women 
from the dormitory, taking into consideration the 
convenience of other students and any possible 
reflection on the reputation of the women guest, the 
individual student, and the College. Specific time 
limits become unnecessary if students act with con- 
cern for their fellow students and women guests. 
Every student should recognize that this freedom to 
exercise individual judgment as to a reasonable hour 
of departure of women guests, like all other freedoms 
in the Honor System, is dependent on his ability to 
exercise responsibihty. 

HONOR SYSTEM INTERPRETATIONS 

Council issues interpretations periodically to clarify 
the Honor System regulations. Interpretations are 



THE HONOR SYSTEM 



13 



provided for by the Constitution of the Students' 
Association. They should be considered not as a body 
of rules, but rather as an indication of the general 
manner with which the Council will deal with possible 
violations as they arise. Council does not wish to list 
explicit definitions of acts in violation of the Honor 
System, for such a list would both negate the im- 
portance of personal honor and prevent proper 
considerations of circumstances in Honor System 
trials. Furthermore, there would be an inherent 
contradiction in such a list, for possible or alleged 
violations become violations only upon a decision of 
Council in an Honor System trial. Desiring that honor 
trials be considered individually as unique and par- 
ticular incidents, and desiring to preserve the flex- 
ibility of evaluation so valuable in an honor trial, 
the Council issues the following interpretations as 
general guidelines to aid all students in the constant 
re-evaluation necessary to the continuation of a true 
and viable Honor System at Haverford. 

Academic Interpretations 

Article I, Section 1 , Paragraph of the Regulations: 
"A student shall never represent another person's 
ideas or scholarship as his own. He shall indicate his 
sources by using where appropriate quotation marks, 
footnotes, and a bibhography." 

This clause is not meant to stifle or restrain in- 
tellectual exploration in any form. With regard to 
discussions and other secondary sources, one may 
assimilate another person's thouglits into those in his 
own paper without acknowledgement; but one's 
replacement of his own structure of ideas with that 
of another must be properly footnoted. 

The Academic section of the Honor System applies 
to all work submitted in aO courses taken at Haver- 
ford, regardless of where the work is done. It also 
applies to all work done in courses taken at other 
schools for credit at Haverford during the academic 
year. 

The Council recognizes that the academic section 
of the Honor System is for the most part clear. 
Where undefined areas still remain, it is the respon- 
sibility of the student to inquire of the professor how 
the standards of the System apply to his particular 
course. 
Interpretations Regarding Women Guests, February 

15, 1967 

It is necessary that the following be taken into 
account in entertaining women guests at Haverford 
College. The responsibility for each person's serious 



and continued consideration of all the following 
lies most generally with the entire community, and, 
more specifically, with aU individuals directly involved 
with and aware of any actions. 

1. Students' Council views the notion of con- 
sideration for the convenience of other stu- 
dents to include respect for a student's reason- 
ably exercised right of privacy, as well as the 
recognition that conditions of privacy are not 
easily achieved and sustained in a small com- 
munity. Dormitory living places highest pri- 
ority on sleeping and studying. Whenever 
women are escorted into the dorms anywhere 
on campus, students should be aware that they 
are guests and deserve to be treated as such. It 
should also be recognized that lack of this 
respectful consideration can lead to inadvertent 
incidents of disrespect to women guests. 

2. Any activities that exploit or affront a woman 
guest are beyond the bounds of both individual 
and collective honor. 

3. Respect for a woman guest includes honoring 
the commitments she may have to institutions 
of which she is a member. 

4. Haverford College is a part of a larger social 
community. When private actions wliich offend 
public mores become publicized and establish- 
ed patterns of behavior, they cause reper- 
cussions on the whole College Community and 
endanger the future existence of the Honor 
System. The presence of women guests on the 
Haverford campus overnight clearly fits into 
category. 
5. Council encourages students to seek private 
accommodations for woman visitors to the 
College. Such accommodations might well 
include (a) faculty homes, (b) Bryn Mawr 
dorms, or (c) entire suites or entries which 
have been cleared for housing weekend guests. 

When any person is concerned about the possible 
failure of another to give serious consideration to the 
preceding, he should follow the procedure outlined in 
Article VI, Section 3, of the Students' Association 
Constitution. 

In addition to the above Interpretations, the Stu- 
dents' Council, on March 19, 1967, issued the fol- 
lowing policy statement relevant to disrespect of 
women guests: 

After meetings with students over incidents in- 
volving possible disrespect to women guests and/or 



14 



THE HONOR SYSTEM 



the college community, Council realized that in a 
number of these cases any such disrespect resulted 
not from the behavior of the principal characters, but 
rather from action by onlookers and those acciden- 
tally involved. It must be emphasized that discord 
between members of the Haverford community due 
to the social behavior of one or another of those 
members is to be eased by discussion between the 
people involved. Barring this, the matter may properly 
be extended only to a member of Council or to 
Council as a whole. In fact, we wholeheartedly urge 
you to speak to Council in the event of an impasse or 
if you are aware of the existence of improper be- 
havior. But the communication of suspicions, infer- 
ences, or even facts to third parties, with no right to 
such information, is not to be tolerated. 

Even an absence of confUct does not grant license 
to gossip. Loose talk frustrates any attempts at dis- 
cretion which might have been made, and aggravates 
the results of any failure to make them. Further, the 
spreading of necessarily incomplete information is 
likely to damage the reputation of everyone involved 
and to have unpleasant repercussions for the College 
community. 

It is Council's feeling that rumor-mongering with 
regard to women guests may be as serious as the 
more generaUy recognized and direct forms of dis- 
respectful action previously discussed, and that this 
statement serves only to explicitly enunciate an idea 
already clearly implicit in the Honor System. 

Interpretations Regarding Final Examinations 

Haverford students have the privilege of scheduling 
their own mid-year and final examinations. The self- 
scheduling system is unique to Haverford, and is a 
result of the Honor System and the responsibility 
assumed by students themselves. This has been 
accorded to students by the faculty, with the under- 
standing that it may be withdrawn by the faculty at 
at any time. 

The continued success, satisfaction, and pride 
which accrues from this system will come only from 
continued strict observance by students of the points 
of academic honor. Giving aid by carelessness can be 
almost as damaging as by intent. 

The Students' Council issued the following inter- 
pretations in regard to the self-scheduhng of final 
exams, June 1964. 

The Council interprets Article I, Section l.A.l. of 
the Honor System which states that "no student shall 



give or receive aid" to mean that the communication, 
whether given or received, of aid regarding an exam- 
ination to any student who is scheduled to take that 
examination is a possible violation of the Honor 
System. In general, the Council interprets "aid" to be 
knowledge of the form, content, or degree of 
difficulty of an examination which could possibly 
affect a student's performance on the examination. 

The Council includes "statements about the degree 
of difficulty" as possible violations because, im- 
plicitly, these statements often communicate informa- 
tion about the form or content of an examination, 
and because they initiate conversation that can lead 
to other violations. 

In a taken/not taken situation any conversation 
about the form, content, or degree of difficulty of an 
exam should be reported immediately as a possible 
violation. 

Any person overhearing any information about 
form, content, or degree of difficulty oi any examina- 
tion should ask the person who has been careless to 
talk to a Council member. The fact that a conversa- 
tion has been overheard indicates a carelessness on 
the part of the student which could lead to a possible 
violation. 

Any discussion of form, content, or degree of 
difficulty of an exam is discouraged. In any dis- 
cussion in the taken/not taken situation precaution 
must be exercised. This precludes any talking about 
exams in pubhc places. 

All parties involved in any possible Honor System 
violation should report themselves immediately to a 
council member regardless of whether or not precau- 
tion had been taken or whether or not the incident 
was accidental. 

We remind the student body that the advantages of 
a self-scheduled examination system can be continued 
only if each student strictly adheres to the responsi- 
bility inherent in such a system. 

RECENT CHANGES IN THE HONOR SYSTEM 

During the 1965-66 and 1966-67 school years, the 
Students' Council devoted considerable time and 
study to an evaluation of the Honor System. After 
extensive discussions with students, administrators, 
and members of the Board of Managers, several 
changes in the Constitution and in the Honor System 
Regulations were presented to the Students' Associa- 
tion in plenary sessions. All changes were subsequent- 
ly approved by the President of the College and are 



THE HONOR SYSTEM 



15 



presently incorporated in the Constitution and in the 
Honor System Regulations. The changes eliminating 
specific time limits for women guests in the dormi- 
tories were reviewed by the Board of Managers who 
authorized the President of the College to give 
provisional approval to these specific changes. Since 
the Council, the Administration, and ultimately, the 
Board of Managers will be reviewing the recent 
changes during the present school year, three state- 
ments regarding the changes are particularly relevant, 
and are presented on the following pages. 



Council Statement of the Purpose of the 
Honor System Changes October 21, 1966. 

At present these statements (Constitutional Honor 
System Standards) are the Haverford Honor System. 
In recent years, however, students have seen the 
Honor System as a body of regulations. The concerns 
of individual students and the interpretations of past 
Councils have dealt exclusively with specific regula- 
tions. The Honor System has become a Ust of do's 
and don'ts often regarded with cynicism. Because of 
this faulty emphasis too many students have failed to 
consider the more important principles involved. 
These rules have become bhnders rather than guide- 
lines. 

Students' Council sees an urgent need to put the 
Honor System into proper perspective. As we see it 
there are two basic concepts in the Honor System: 
individual responsibility and respect for learning and 
people. This is it. 

But these words mean nothing by themselves. The 
Honor System exists only when each student asks 
what these words mean to him in every situation. We 
can give no definitions; we expect no student to have 
the definitions. All we can ask is that each student 
constantly search for them — search not in the rules 
or changes in them, but in himself and in his actions 
as they affect others. 



Statement by the President of the College 
Provisionally Accepting the New Regulations 
February 25, 1967 

The Board of Managers at its meeting on February 
24, 1967, approved the Students' Association's desire 
to increase students' responsibility for self-government 
in the area of social behavior. It also approved my 



recommendation that the new Regulations be pro- 
visionally accepted by the College administration. I 
have informed the Students' Council of my accept- 
ance of them. 

In taking this action, the Board requested that the 
students of the College be informed and understand 
that this approval was given within the framework of 
a "Statement of Acceptance" which sets forth some 
of the specific views of the Board. The Board's 
Statement of Acceptance follows: 

The Board accepts the Administration's rec- 
ommendation to approve provisionally the 
changes in the Honor System Regulations, as 
interpreted by the Students' Council. 

By so doing, the Board reaffirms the desirability 
of responsible student self-government and the 
Board's confidence in the abihty of Haverford 
students to govern themselves through the Stu- 
dents' Association. 

The Board does so with the understanding that 
it continue to regard for the Haverford College 
campus the presence of women guests in the 
dormitories overnight or for excessively late 
hours, and sexual intercourse as unacceptable 
behavior. 

The Board beUeves that these new Students' 
Association's Regulations and as interpreted by the 
Students' Council should be put into effect on a 
provisional basis for several reasons. First, this will 
enable us to gain experience as to the effectiveness of 
the new Regulations and of the Council's Interpreta- 
tions of February 15, 1967. Furthermore, it will 
provide an opportunity for the Board's Student 
Affairs Committee, the Administration and the Stu- 
dents' CouncO to have a continuing dialogue concern- 
ing the standards which each group believes are 
consistent with the Honor System and are relevant 
to the mores of the College and the social community 
of which we aU are important parts. Finally, the 
Board requested its Student Affairs Committee to 
undertake a continuing study of the operations of 
these Regulations during the next year and to report 
the results of this study to the Board for its review at 
the end of the year. 

Towards these ends, I will appoint, in consultation 
with the President of the Students' Association, a 
committee to study the effects of these changes 
during the coming year. 



16 



THE HONOR SYSTEM 



Council's Statement on the Board's Action — Read 
by the President of the Students' Association at 
Collection, February 28, 1967 

The action by the Board of Managers last Friday 
night is a major vote of confidence in the students of 
Haverford and in their ability to govern themselves. 

The Board found it necessary to interpret w^hat it 
felt was respect for the college community, and 
Students' Council urges each student to carefully 
consider the Board's opinion. The Board wants every 
student to know its position, but it has left the Stu- 
dents' Council free to follow its own interpretations. 
The Board understands that the new system will be 
run by the Students' Council, in accordance with 
Students' Council interpretations. 

The Board of Managers fully realizes the magnitude 
of the change in the Honor System. In their pro- 
visional acceptance they have felt a need to express 
deep concerns, doubts, and hopes for the coming 
year. They have asked their Student Affairs Com- 
mittee to work closely with Students' Council to see 
if the new system is working as planned. 

We feel the need to emphasize the fact that these 
changes are, as of now, provisional. The success of 
the amendments depends entirely on the responsi- 
bility which we, the students, exercise in the coming 
year. Living together well, with respect for each other, 
for our guests and for the community, acting with 
honor and responsibility is the prime focus of the 
new system. 

We, the students of Haverford College, must assure 
that this confidence was not misplaced. We all must 



be working hard in the next year to make this new 
system work. 

In the coming year CouncO will be working closely 
with the Student Affairs Committee of the Board, 
the Administration, and with the student body to 
make the system work. In the coming weeks we will 
sponsor dorm sessions to discuss further these changes 
and their effects on the College community. We are 
in the process of setting up an Honor System Com- 
mittee to help us continually study the effects of the 
new system in the coming year. 

In my working with the Council and the Ad- 
ministration these past few weeks, I have been really 
impressed how serious these changes are. We are one 
of the few, perhaps the only, colleges in the nation 
with such a comprehensive Honor System. We are 
truly leading the educational world in this respect. 
This means that our responsibility is all the greater. 
Let me reiterate that: 

1. This is a provisional acceptance and we must 
prove this year that a system such as this can work. 

2. The interpretations of the Council are the 
operative interpretations. 

3. It is in the hands of the students of Haverford 
College to discover whether in a community resting 
on the responsibility of each individual member, 
students can really live together better and discover a 
real sense of honor. 

We owe a debt of gratitude to President Borton, 
Vice President Wallace, Provost Green, and Dean 
Lyons, without whose active support these changes 
would never have received the Board's approval. 



Campus Guidelines 




Topic Page 

Code of Student Responsibility 18 

Conduct in Community Life 18 

Faculty-Student Relationship 18 

Drinking 18 

Drugs 19 

Property 19 

Disciplinary Actions 19 

Summary 20 

Controversial Subjects 20 

Relationship with Law Enforcement Agencies 20 

Laws Pertaining to Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs 21 

General Regulations of the Students' Association 21 

Conduct 21 

Forced entry 21 

Damages 21 

Library 21 

Public Functions 21 

Paid Political Activities 21 

Residence Requirements 22 

Vacation Policies 22 

Nature and Purpose of Fifth Day Meeting 22 

Academic Standards - Minimum Levels of Promotion 22 

Failed Courses 22 

Dropped Courses 23 

Grading Procedures 23 

Committee on Academic Standing 23 

Academic FlexibiUty 24 

Major Field of Study 24 

Attendance at Classes 24 

Attendance at Collection 24 

Term Paper Deadlines 24 

Registration of Campus Events 25 

Selling, Soliciting, Peddling 25 

Gambling 25 

Use of the College's Name 25 

Change of Home Address 25 

Motor Vehicle Regulations 25 

Registration Procedure 25 

Temporary Registration 25 

Parking 25 

Display of Decal 26 

Driving Habits and Speed 26 

Enforcement and Fines 26 



17 



18 



CAMPUS GUIDELINES 



CODE OF STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY 

The basis of the code of Student ResponsibiUty is 
the belief that individual freedom, as opposed to 
license, should be sought, and that this freedom can 
best be attained through the cooperation of each 
member of the community in avoiding actions which 
infringe upon the freedoms or well being of others. 
Its goal is also to encourage individuals to develop 
responsible judgement capable of directing their 
conduct with a minimum of specific rules. Set rules 
are seldom effective in establishing the inner sense of 
responsibility for which the College community 
stands. This personal responsibihty is likely to grow 
when a student is both free and obligated to grapple 
with principles of conduct and to consider the 
possible consequences of his actions in the context of 
guidelines against which he can test his own 
actions and place them in a better perspective. The 
Code of Student Responsibility is a statement of such 
guidelines. 

Conduct in Community Life 

In Collection, in Meeting, in the dining hall and in 
the student dormitories, courtesy should at all times 
be extended to guests and to other students. 

We should remind ourselves that our conduct and 
dress require our attention when we are deaUng with 
people whom we, or others, have invited to the 
campus. 



We should also realize that the closest contact with 
fellow students arises in the dormitories. Any action 
or noise, especially at late hours, that disturbs others 
is undesirable. 

Meeting is a place for worship and should be 
respected as such. 

Faculty - Student Relationship 

FACULTY-STUDENT RELATIONSHIP. It should 
be recognized that all of us — students, faculty, 
administration, staff — have certain duties and 
responsibilities that can be legitimately expected of 
us. It is in the interest of Haverford to maintain close 
faculty-student relationships, but these must be built 
upon mutual courtesy and respect. 

Drinking 

The Haverford student body has maintained a 
tradition as regards drinking which has prevented it 
from becoming the major problem here which it has 
become on some campuses. This tradition is worth 
maintaining. 

Student drinking of alcoholic beverages is not 
consistent with the history of the College, with the 
tenets of Friends' belief, with excellence in scholar- 
ship under the prevalent conditions of academic 
pressure, or with the maintenance of a healthy 
community. 

Prohibition is inconsistent with the freedom of 
individual development which is the proudest part of 




CAMPUS GUIDELINES 



19 



the life of the College. But hberty does not mean 
license. Drinking to excess in any form; drinking in 
public places on the campus; furnishing alcoholic 
beverages to minors; and any breach of taste induced 
or encouraged by drinking will not be tolerated. 
Students are advised of recent changes in state 
laws which make it illegal for minors to possess or 
consume alcoholic beverages. 

Drugs 

The medically unsupervised use, possession or 
distribution of potentially harmful drugs such as 
hallucinogens, amphetamines, barbiturates and opiates 
is illegal and subject to very harsh penalties. Although 
the Administration does not assume the responsibility 
of acting as an arm of the law, students have no 
greater protection from the law than any citizen. It 
is also known that use of many of these drugs 
threatens the physical and mental health of the user. 
Use by one student may also threaten the welfare of 
other students. 

Thus, with the legal and medical welfare of the 
student in mind, the College cannot approve of the 
medically unsupervised use, possession or distribution 
of any of these drugs. 

General prohibition of the use, possession or dis- 
tribution of these drugs would be inconsistent with 
the philosophy of this Code. Yet, the absence of 
corrective action in some specific cases of such 
involvement may be equally inconsistent. Because the 
use, possession or distribution of these drugs poses a 
great potential danger to others, disciplinary action 
must always be considered when such activity occurs. 
The nature of any resultant disciplinary action will be 
proportional to the severity of the dangers to others. 

Because use of these drugs is often associated with 
medical and psychological problems, students involved 
in their use will be referred to the counseUng and 
medical services of the College. 

Property 

The College, in acknowledging its responsibility to 
maintain the buildings and other facilities, expects 
the students to do their part in keeping the buildings 
in good order. 

While the College expects to take care of normal 
wear and tear, it is assumed that specific damage will 
be reported promptly by the individual student 
responsible, and that the costs involved in repair will 
be borne by that student. 



Damage to College property involves, among other 
things, disregard of the interests of fellow students. 

Disciplinary Actions 

Disciplinary action which may limit a student's 
freedom, or even separate him from the College, is 
only taken when it is clear that discussion alone is not 
sufficient to end the irresponsible acts and that action 
is called for to protect the College and its students 
from serious damage. 

The Students' Council has the responsibOity for 
establishing and maintaining the Honor System and 
for responding to actions inconsistent with it. Aca- 
demic standards are established by the Faculty and 
administered by the Dean of the College. Academic 
deficiencies of individual students are dealt with by 
the faculty Academic Standing Committee. The 
responsibihty for non-academic and non-Honor Sys- 
tem matters, as set forth in the Code of Student 
Responsibility and in other regulations, is shared by 
the Students' Council and the Dean of Students. 

The disciplinary process follows a carefully chosen 
procedure to insure that conditions of reason and 
fairness are not abridged. The Dean of Students and 
the Students' Council President each bring to the 
attention of the other any possible breach of respon- 
sible conduct which seems to require further action, 
including gathering added information. The Dean and 
the Council President discuss the relative seriousness 
of the matter, and agree on how it should best be 
handled. Discussion with the student or students 
involved is often sufficient. If not, other actions are 
taken. 

If the matter is given to the Students' Council, it 
follows its regular procedure, and makes a recommen- 
dation to the administration on action to be taken. 
If the matter is given to the Dean of Students he 
confers with the student involved (1) to warn of 
possible discipHnary action and clarify the relevant 
standards, and (2) to get a full understanding of the 
facts and circumstances of the matter. There is a 
basic assumption of honesty in aO such discussions. 
If, after this preliminary conversation, some further 
action still seems necessary, besides a referral for 
counseling, the Dean of Students drafts a statement 
of the case and a suggested course of action which he 
discusses with the Council President and with ap- 
propriate administrative colleagues. 

A letter is then prepared and subsequently dis- 
cussed with the student which explains the relevant 



20 



CAMPUS GUIDELINES 



facts, the pertinent standard violated, and the re- 
suhlng discipHnary action. In this letter, the student is 
advised of his right to appeal the decision to the Stu- 
dents' Council or to the President of the College. A 
decision resulting from an appeal is binding. 

All disciplinary actions are confidential, never 
leave school files, and are not noted on the student's 
transcript. Records of disciplinary actions are des- 
troyed when the student is graduated from the 
College. 

By far the most common disciplinary action 
involves a probation which puts a student on notice 
that, for a specified period of time, certain expecta- 
tions of conduct must be met and possibly that cer- 
tain privileges have been withdrawn. Consequences of 
any violation of the terms of the probation are also 
defined and may range from further and more re- 
strictive probation to actual separation from the 
College. Since the terms of the probation are designed 
to prevent a reoccurence of the misconduct, a student 
often suggests his own terms. A student is separated 
from the College immediately and without probation 
only when it is felt that continued serious misconduct 
is probable or when the consequences of even likely 
reoccurence are sufficiently serious so as to seriously 
damage other individuals in the community. This 
separation, like any other disciplinary action, follows 
the above procedures. 

While the office of the Dean of Students exists for 
the welfare of the students, it should be recognized 
that disciplinary actions are one of the several 
responsibilities of this office. Unlike the College 
counselors, the Dean of Students is not always free 
to accept information, in confidence, that could lead 
to disciplinary actions. Students should bear this in 
mind while discussing such matters with him. 



CONTROVERSIAL SUBJECTS 



Haverford College holds that open-minded and 
free inquiry is essential to a student's educational 
development. Thus, the College recognizes the right 
of all students to engage in discussion, to exchange 
thought and opinion, and to speak or write freely on 
any subject. To be complete, this freedom to learn 
must include the right of inquiry both in and out of 
the classroom and must be free from any arbitrary 
rules or actions that would deny students the freedom 
to make their own choice regarding controversial 
issues. 

Further, the College endeavors to develop in its 
students the realization that as members of a free 
society they have not only the right but also the 
obligation to inform themselves about various prob- 
lems and issues, and are free to formulate and ex- 
press their positions on these issues. 

Finally, the College reaffirms the freedom of 
assembly as an essential part of the process of dis- 
cussion, inquiry and advocacy. Students, therefore, 
have the right to found new, or to join existing 
organizations, on or off campus, which advocate and 
engage in lawful actions to implement their an- 
nounced goals. 

Student actions such as those here involved do not 
imply approval, disapproval, or sponsorship by the 
College or its student body; neither do such actions 
in any way absolve a student from his academic 
responsibilities. Similarly, students are expected to 
make clear that they are speaking or acting as in- 
dividuals and not for the College or its student body. 

The freedom to learn, to inquire, to speak, to 
organize and to act with conviction within the bounds 
of law, are held by Haverford College to be a cor- 
nerstone of education in a free society. 



Summary 

Pride in the College, in our sense of community, 
and in ourselves leads us to see ways of freeing our- 
selves from a strait-jacket of rules and regulations 
through the development of an approach to life on 
which we can all agree and for which we each feel a 
responsibihty. 

The emphasis in the above "code" is positive 
rather than negative; it is on a standard of desirable 
conduct rather than on a delineation of prohibited 
behavior. 



RELATIONSHIP WITH LAW ENFORCEMENT 
AGENCIES 

While the College assumes no responsibility for 
acting as an arm of the law, neither does it afford 
its students any greater protection from the law than 
that enjoyed by all citizens. In the absence of parents, 
the College does assume a responsibility for assuring 
its students equal protection under the law. 



CAMPUS GUIDELINES 



21 



LAWS PERTAINING TO NARCOTICS 
AND DANGEROUS DRUGS 

In its report to the President last yeai, the Student- 
Faculty Committee on Drugs expressed a concern 
about the legal jeopardy of students involved with 
drugs. The Committee noted the severity of penalties 
as provided by State and Federal laws, as weU as a i 
lack of awareness by many of the fact that the laws 
are enforced, and that the penalties are imposed. The 
Committee urged that students be made aware of the 
laws regarding the use, possession, and distribution 
of narcotic and dangerous drugs. 

WTiat follows is a very abbreviated summary of the 
penalties provided by Federal legislation. More de- 
tailed summaries of the State and Federal laws are 
available in the Dean of Students' Office. 

Narcotics 

For sale or transfer — not less than five or more 
than twenty years in jaU for the first offense; ten to 
forty years for subsequent offenses; fines of up to 
520,000. 

For illegal use or possession — two to ten years in 
iaH for first offense; five to twenty years for second 
offense; ten to forty years subsequently. 

Non-Narcotics 

For illegal sale or transfer — jail up to two years 
and maximum fine of 55,000; subsequent offenses — 
jail sentence up to six years and maximum fine of 
515,000. 

For illegal use or possession — jaU for one year 
and maximum fine of $1,000 for first offense; 
subsequently jail for three years and maximum fine 
of 510.000. 



GENERAL REGULATIONS OF THE 
STUDENTS' ASSOCL^TION 

a. CONTDUCT. Students shall not engage in any 
activity on the CoUege campus which the Council 
shall deem physically dangerous to property or per- 
sons. Among these activities deemed dangerous by 
the Students' Council have been the possession of 
firecrackers, the turning in of false fire alarms, the 
overturning of fire extinguishers, the throwing of 
bottles out of dormitory windows, and the building 
of fires in College buildings outside the regular hearths 
provided by the College. 



b. FORCED ENTRY. Forced entry or entrance 
into pubUc or private property on campus without 
the permission of the owner or resident is forbidden. 

c. DAMAGES. Students responsible for damage 
to College property shall report it to the Students' 
Council damage coordinator, Steve Erb, whereupon 
they wiU be billed only for the actual cost of repairs. 
If the damage is not reported, the Council will under- 
take to investigate the matter thoroughly, and may 
take action in any of the following ways: 

1. If the Council damage coordinator can place 
responsibility upon individuals it will report their 
names to the comptroller, who will bill them for only 
the damage. 

2. If the. Council cannot fix the responsibility 
upon individuals but accepts it as probable that the 
damage or loss was due to students, it may authorize 
action as follows: 

a) the assessment by the College of a specified 
group of students. 

b) the assessment by the CoUege of the 
whole student body. 

c) in cases of small amounts, the Council 
itself may pay for the damage of loss out 
of its own funds. 

3. An amount of SI .00 per student, per semester, 
is set aside in CoUege funds as a reserve for unassign- 
able damages. 

d. LIBRARY. Students have an individual obU- 
gation to observe the Library rules as printed in the 
separate pamphlet on the library. 

e. PUBLIC FUNCTIONS. Permission to hold for- 
mal or informal public functions is to be obtained by 
registering the event in advance with the Office of the 
Dean of Students. The sponsor is responsible to the 
Dean of Students and the Students' Council for the 
function. 



PAID POLITICAL ACTrVTTIES 

The CoUege does not aUow students to receive pay 
for distribution of such things as poUtical tracts, 
reUgious tracts, or propaganda material. This poUcy 
does not apply to voluntary activities of this nature 
when payment is not involved. Thus a student with 
convictions is free to hand out material in which he 
beUeves, as long as he is not paid to do so. 



22 



CAMPUS GUIDELINES 



RESIDENCE REQUIREMENTS 

The residential nature of Haverford College is an 
integral part of its educational philosophy. Therefore, 
students, with the exception of those who are married 
or are living at home, are normally expected to live 
on campus. 

VACATION POLICIES 

There are four scheduled vacation recesses during 
the school year; Thanksgiving, Christmas, Mid- Year 
Recess, and Spring Vacations. With minor exceptions 
student services and facilities and academic facilities 
are closed or drastically curtailed during vacation 
periods. 

All classroom and laboratory buildings are subject 
to closing during all vacations. Some classrooms may 
be opened during working hours during Thanksgiving, 
Mid-Year, and those days during Christmas and 
Spring Vacations when students are allowed in the 
dormitories. Students are not allowed in locked 
buildings unless accompanied by a faculty member. 

The Haverford Union is open during working hours 
on weekdays only during all vacations. 



NATURE AND PURPOSE 
OF FIFTH DAY MEETING 

Haverford College was founded by the Religious 
Society of Friends, and for many years students were 
required to attend Friends Meeting on Thursday 
morning at 10:45. Recently the College ruled that 
attendance at these Meetings is voluntary. No classes 
or other academic appointments may be scheduled 
for this hour, however, and all students are encour- 
aged to take advantage of the opportunity to join the 
College community for silent meditation and an 
occasional spoken message. 

The Meeting represents the spiritual community 
of the College and is an essential part of the Hfe of 
the College. It is non-sectarian in character. It also 
provides a focus for the moral concerns which move 
the participants, and at intervals at the end of a period 
of meditation, the Meeting will turn to discussion of 
its concerns in a meeting for business. 

All entering freshmen will be given a period of 
orientation to acquaint them with the tradition and 
character of the Meeting, and will be required to 
attend a certain number of Meetings during their first 
semester. 



ACADEMIC STANDARDS - 
MINIMUM LEVELS FOR PROMOTION 

Grading standards at Haverford are as foUows: 

1. The minimum passing grade is 60. No course 
credit is given for a course in which the grade is below 
60, though the grade will be counted in the student's 
general average. Departmental 100 courses require a 
minimum grade of 70. 

2. If a student receives a grade lower than 65 in a 
course which is prerequisite for another course, he 
must, in order to take that other course, receive the 
permission of the instructor. (In some cases a grade 
higher than 65 may be required in a prerequisite 
course.) 

3. The general averages required for promotion 
are 60 for Freshmen, 65 for Sophomores, and 70 for 
Juniors. The average for the Senior year required for 
graduation is 70. 

4. Grades in courses presented in fulfillment of a 
major program of concentration must be 65 or above. 
In the case of a full-year course the full-year average 
must be 65 or above. 

5. If, for reasons beyond his control, such as 
illness, a student is allowed by the dean to withdraw 
from a course, the grade is recorded as "W" and not 
included in the student's average. If a student drops a 
course without permission, or is dropped from a 
course, that grade is recorded as "DR" and averaged 
as 40. The lowest grade average for a course which a 
student completes is 45. 



FAILED COURSES 

Normally, a course which is failed has to be made 
up, either: (a) by passing with a grade of C or better, 
a course approved in advance by the dean, in summer 
school, or (b) by passing an extra course at Haverford. 

In order to graduate, a student must pass 36 
semester courses. Each student must take five courses 
in each of four semesters (usually the first four) and 
four or more courses in each of four additional semes- 
ters. It was not the intention of the faculty, in per- 
mitting four 4-course semesters, that they should be 
used primariJy for makeups of failures by being ex- 
panded to 5-course semesters. However, in some 
circumstances, the Committee on Academic Standing 
may permit a student to make up a failure in this way 
rather than by going to summer school. Each student 
who fails a course should discuss with the dean 



CAMPUS GUIDELINES 



23 



whether he should go to summer school or request 
permission from the Committee on Academic Stand- 
ing to make up the failure with an extra course at 
Haverford. 

Students who have failed courses should not ex- 
pect to make them up during the Senior year. Al- 
though, as mentioned above, the Committee on 
Academic Standing deals with each case individually, 
a general rule is that a student who has failed one or 
more courses should have at least 28 course credits 
before beginning the Senior year. 

DROPPED COURSES 

Although students may choose, within limits, in 
which semesters they will take only four courses, they 
may not change their minds once the semester is well 
under way. After the first three weeks of a semester 
no course for which a student has registered may be 
dropped without penalty, the penalty being a grade 
of "DR" for the dropped course, this grade being 
averaged as 40. This rule applies whether or not the 
course is needed. For example, a second semester 
senior with 32 credits may not sign up for five courses 
and then drop one (after the first two weeks) without 
penalty. If the drop is for reasons beyond the stu- 
dent's control, such as illness, the penalty is not 
apphed; the grade is "W," withdrawn, and the 
average is based on the remaining courses. 

If a student wants to take an extra course but is 
not sure he can handle it, he should discuss the 
matter with the dean, who may sometimes arrange for 
the student to have a longer period, for example, a 
month, before he is fully committed to the schedule 
arranged. But such arrangements must be made in 
advance. 



GRADING PROCEDURES 

The academic unit at Haverford is the semester 
course. For the first two years (Freshman and Sopho- 
more) the official transcript will contain only a list 
of courses a student has taken without grades. A 
notation will be made if a student fails, drops, or 
withdraws from a course. This will go into effect 
beginning with the Class of 1971, but will not apply 
to students in earlier classes. 

Numerical grades will be given and grade reports 
will be sent to the student, to his advisor, and to the 
dean. 



In the Junior and Senior years a student may 
choose to take one course outside his major division 
each semester for which no grade will be recorded. 
The grade for this course will appear on the grade 
report sent the student, but will not be entered on 
the transcript. Again the transcript will record a 
failure, drop, or withdrawal. 

To avail himself of this option, a student must 
indicate at the time of registration that he is taking 
the course without a recorded grade. No changes in 
this option can be made after the beginning of classes. 

In some advanced courses. Senior research and 
departmental studies, a written evaluation will be 
given in place of a numerical grade. In such courses, 
the transcript will indicate that a written evaluation 
accompanies the transcript and a note made if the 
course was failed. 



COMMITTEE ON ACADEMIC STANDING 

The Committee on Academic Standing is a stand- 
ing committee of the faculty responsible for reviewing 
periodically the records of all students whose work is 
unsatisfactory. The members of the committee are 
Mr. Santer, Chairman, and Messrs. Butman, Davidon, 
Heath, and Spielman. The committee meets regularly 
when deficiencies are reported and semester grades 
are given. It has the authority to drop students from 
the College or to prescribe certain conditions for 
continuing or additional work. 

Should a student's record warrant his being drop- 
ped from the College or required to take a leave of 
absence, the decision of the committee will be post- 
poned to a second meeting which will be held within 
five days of the first, and the student and his adviser 
will be notified that such action is possible. The stu- 
dent will be invited to appear before the committee 
if he wishes to do so, and his adviser, or another 
faculty member who knows him well may be invited 
to be present as well. If the student does not appear, 
the committee will make a decision in his absence 
and inform him of it in writing. 

Decisions of the Committee on Academic Standing 
may be appealed to the President of the College. 



24 



CAMPUS GUIDELINES 



ACADEMIC FLEXIBILITY 

A new program, called "Academic FlexibUity," 
has been approved by the faculty. The Academic 
Flexibility Committee is authorized to grant an ex- 
ception to the academic regulations, especially for a 
strong student, where this will make it possible for 
him to achieve academic goals which otherwise might 
be difficult. 

Some samples of the kinds of exceptions which 
this Committee might grant are given on pages 47-49 
of the current coUege catalog. Interested students are 
invited to submit proposals in writing to Dean 
Spielman, who is the executive secretary of the 
committee. Students are welcome to consult with 
him or with other members of the committee (Messrs. 
Satterthwaite, Bernstein, and Heath) before sub- 
mitting a proposal. 

Students should note that this committee deals 
largely with exceptions arising from academic excel- 
lence; academic troubles are the responsibility of the 
Committee on Academic Standing. 

MAJOR FIELD OF STUDY 

Toward the end of his Sophomore year, each stu- 
dent is required to select his major field of study. 
Students should consult with their advisors, and may 
also wish to consult with the dean or with other 
faculty members, students, and administration. 



^^^^^tijfllH: ^f" ^ 




^^k 





The deadline for selection of a major is 4:00 p.m. 
on Friday. April 14th. before which time the student 
must file his major selection with the dean of the 
College. Failure to meet the deadline entails a charge 
of S 1 .00 per day of lateness. 

ATTENDANCE AT CLASSES 

Students are expected to attend all of their classes. 
Wlien absences are necessary they should be explained 
to the satisfaction of the instructor, preferably in 
advance. The responsibility for making up work 
missed rests with the student. 

Policies with respect to unexcused absences will 
vary from one class to another. Should a student's 
attendance in any course be unsatisfactory, his 
instructor may send him a written notice, a copy of 
which goes to the dean, stating that in effect any 
further unexcused absence will result in his being 
dropped from the course. 

A student whose performance suffers as a result of 
chronic absenteeism may be put on probation by the 
dean. Specific terms of the probation will be spelled 
out in each letter, copies of which are sent to the 
student's instructors. Normally this probation will 
mean that an unexcused absence from any class 
during the period specified may result in the student's 
being dropped from that course. 

ATTENDANCE AT COLLECTION 

All students are required to attend CoUection each 
Tuesday in Roberts Hall at 10:40 a.m. Two cuts are 
allowed each semester. 

TERM PAPER DEADLINES 

No paper may be accepted for credit by any 
member of the faculty after 4:00 p.m. on Tuesday, 
January 9 (for the first semester) or 12:00 noon on 
Saturday, May 1 1 (for the second semester). If the 
instructor sets a date earlier than this, the papers are 
due then, and he may penalize late papers at his 
discretion. 

If a paper is assigned in place of the final exam- 
ination, the date by which it is due is set by the 
instructor, but it may not be later than 4:00 p.m., 
Friday, January 19 (first semester) and 4:00 p.m. on 
Monday, May 20 (second semester). 

The maximum grade for a late paper will be one 
half the grade it would have received had it been on 



CAMPUS GUIDELINES 



25 



time. If such a paper represents the entire grade for 
the course, the maximum grade is 60, or, in a course 
required for the major, 65. 

Any student who anticipates that he will not be 
able to meet a deadline should go to the dean, 
who, if he believes the case warrants it, will give the 
student a note to take to the instructor, authorizing 
him, if he sees fit, to grant an extension, and suggest- 
ing the terms on which it may be granted. 

REGISTRATION OF CAMPUS EVENTS 

All campus events, other than regularly scheduled 
academic functions and intercollegiate athletics, must 
be registered and approved at least 10 days in advance 
in the Office of the Dean of Students. 

This poUcy includes social events, mixers, lectures, 
concerts, and other College and student-sponsored 
events. 

SELLING, SOLICITING, PEDDLING 

Generally the privilege of selling on campus is 
reserved for students. The Students' Council annually 
awards concessions to deserving students. In those 
cases where a student sales representative cannot be 
found, outside firms must have written permission 
from the Dean of Students in order to sell on the 
campus. 

The presence of unauthorized persons anywhere 
on the premises should be reported promptly to a 
member of the Students' Council or the Dean of 
Students. 



GAMBLING 

Gambling of any type is prohibited at Haverford 
College. 

USE OF THE COLLEGE'S NAME 

No student organization or individual student may 
enter into any contractual agreement using the name 
of the organization or of the College without prior 
approval by the College through the Office of the 
Dean of Students. 

CHANGE OF HOME ADDRESS 

It is important that each student keep the College 
informed of his home address. Any changes in a 



student's home address during a semester should be 
transmitted to the registrar. 



MOTOR VEHICLE REGULATIONS 

All students washing to possess or operate a car, 
motorcycle, other motor vehicle while at College 
must register the vehicle with the College. This rule 
may not be circumvented by storing a car off campus. 
Any student may register a car with the exception of 
resident, first-semester Freshmen and resident, second- 
semester Freshmen whose average is below 85. 

Registration Procedure 

A student should register his vehicle with the 
Buildings and Grounds Department. The registration 
fee is $10 per year, or $6 for one semester. 

At the time of registration the student must pre- 
sent proof of ownership and the name of the 
insurance company and the number of the policy 
under which he has UabUity insurance. A temporary 
permit will be issued in cases where insurance or other 
information is incomplete. 

The deadUne for registering cars brought on cam- 
pus at the beginning of the coUege year is 4:00 p.m., 
Friday, September 22. Cars brought on campus later 
must be registered within one day of arrival. 

Temporary Registration 

A student may have a car here for two or three 
days if he obtains permission from the Dean of 
Students and secures a temporary registration permit 
from the Buildings and Grounds Department. 

Parking 

Student parking is permitted only in the Field 
House lot. Vehicles may not be parked in such a way 
as to occupy two parking spaces. It is forbidden to 
park, or temporarily stop a car on any campus road. 

The responsibiUty for finding a legal parking space 
rests with the automobile owner. Lack of space is 
not considered a valid excuse for violation of reg- 
ulations, just as there is no valid excuse for parking 
in an improper space. 

Where special circumstances require parking in an 
improper space, permission should be sought in 
advance with the Buildings and Grounds Supervisor, 
Mr. Bogart. 

Disabled cars are not allowed on the campus and 
extensive repairs are not to be carried out on the 



26 



CAMPUS GUIDELINES 



premises. Students with cars rendered immobile be- 
cause of mechanical failure should immediately con- 
tact the foreman of the grounds, Mr. Porreca, who 
wUl assist in either starting the car or in moving it to 
an appropriate location. 

Student parking on residential side streets near 
the campus is prohibited. 

Display of Decal 

The registration decal must be affixed to the left 
side of the rear bumper so that it is entirely visible. 
Decals which become defective or defaced will be 
replaced without charge. Decals are not transferable 
from one vehicle to another, and must be removed in 
cases of change of ownership of the vehicle. Decals 
from previous years may not be displayed. 

Driving Habits and Speed 

The speed limit on the campus is 15 miles per 
hour. Vehicles must be fully muffled and driven in a 
manner in which there is no noise disturbance. 
Vehicles are allowed on regular campus roads only. 

Enforcement and Fines 

The person in whose name a vehicle is registered 
is responsible for any violations placed on it. Viola- 



tion notices and resulting fines are forwarded by cam- 
pus mail, and if possible, by notice left in the car or 
on the windshield. There is no provision for warnings. 

A student wishing to appeal a traffic fine should 
appeal to the Dean of Students. Appeals must be 
made within three working days following the viola- 
tion, and cannot be considered thereafter. 

Violations of these regulations are subject to fines 
as follows: 

Failure to register a vehicle $ 1 5 .00 

Speeding or reckless driving 5.00 

Failure to stop at stop sign 5.00 

All other violations 2.00 

Income from fines is deposited to a scholarship fund. 

After being issued three tickets for violations in 
any one academic year for illegal parking, a further 
violation will result in the vehicle being towed away 
to the Field House lot at the owner's expense ($20) 
without prior notice or warning. 

A student may be denied the privilege of having a 
motor vehicle on campus when he receives five viola- 
tions within one academic year. Driving while in- 
toxicated will result in automatic loss of driving 
privileges. 



IV 

Athletics 






Topic Page 

Physical Education Requirements 28 

Swimming Tests 28 

Intercollegiate Athletics 28 

Intercollegiate Eligibility 28 

Athletic Awards 28 

Varsity Team Captains 28 

Intramural Athletics 28 

Registration 29 

Requirements for Physical Education 29 

Registration Requirements 29 







27 



28 



ATHLETICS 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 

Each student is required to take eight terms of 
Non-Academic courses (Fall, Winter, Spring) with a 
minimum of five terms in Physical Education. 

Freshmen are required to take Non-Academic 
work all three terms. At least two terms of phy- 
sical eaucation are required and physical educa- 
tion must be taken in the fall term of the freshman 
year. Freshmen who demonstrate satisfactory pro- 
gress in the fall term may petition the Non-Academic 
Programs Committee for permission to take a course 
from the Arts and Service Program in one of the 
remaining terms. Sophomores and Juniors are required 
to take two terms of Non-Academic work, at least 
one of which is in physical education. The student 
may schedule the appropriate remaining required 
term in the sophomore, junior, or senior year. A stu- 
dent who receives a "U" in any term must then take 
appropriate Non-Academic courses every term until 
he is caught up in his requirements. All eight terms 
may be selected in physical education. 



SWIMMING TESTS 

Students must also take a swimming test upon 
entering the CoUege. Those who fail to pass the 
swimming test will be scheduled for swimming instruc- 
tion during the early fall and late spring. This test 
must be passed before graduation. 



Haverford allows four years participation in all 
varsity sports. A student may not compete in more 
than one sport at one time. 

ATHLETIC AWARDS 

Members of varsity squads who successfully com- 
plete minimum requirements as established by the 
department are eUgible to receive a varsity letter and 
sweater the first time a letter is won. Class numerals 
are awarded to both varsity and junior varsity squad 
members. 



VARSITY TEAM CAPTAINS 1967 - 1968 



Football 

Soccer 

Cross Country 

Basketball 

Wrestling 

Fencing 

Swimming 

Baseball 

Track 

Termis 

Golf 

Cricket 



James B. Ritter '68 
Lawrence S. Root '68 
Alan C. Servetnick '68 
Glenn F. Swanson '68 
Silas Uttle, III '68 
Stanley A. Jarocki '69 
Timothy L. Loose '68 
Alan S. DeCourcy '68 
E. Dale Adkins '68 
PhiUp N. Pritchard '69 
Stanley A. Jarocki '69 
SHas Little, III '68 
Robert A. Swift '68 
Francis P. Engel '68 
Harry Ottinger, III '68 



INTERCOLLEGUTE ATHLETICS 

Intercollegiate athletic schedules are arranged in 
football, soccer, cross country, basketball, wrestling, 
fencing, swimming, baseball, track, tennis, golf, and 
cricket. Junior varsity schedules are arranged in 
soccer, basketball, wrestling, track, fencing, football, 
baseball, and tennis. These activities coupled with an 
extensive intramural program make it possible for a 
large majority of students to engage in some form of 
competitive athletics. 



INTERCOLLEGIATE ELIGIBILITY 

The eligibility roles are those of the National 
Collegiate Athletic Association and the Eastern Col- 
legiate Athletic Conference. Copies are on file in the 
Athletic Office. 



INTRAMURAL ATHLETICS 

The fall program of the physical education depart- 
ment consists of tennis instruction, the regular phys- 
ical education class in which touch football and 
soccer are taught, plus an intramural program of 
touch football and soccer. 

The winter program consists of instruction in 
basketball, volleyball, handball, and badminton. This 
program is supplemented by intramurals in the same 
activities. 

The spring program offers instruction in Softball, 
tennis, and golf. The tennis course meets daily, with 
Monday lectures and instruction on the courts the 
other two days. Golf instruction is scheduled two 
days per week with a third day elected for practice or 
play. The Softball instruction is scheduled Monday, 
Wednesday, and Friday. This program is also sup- 
plemented by intramural softbaU and tennis. 



ATHLETICS 



29 



REGISTRATION 



Fall Program Freshmen: Wednesday, Sept. 13, 

7:00 p.m. 

Upperclassmen: Monday, Sept. 

18, 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., 

Registrar's Office 

Classes begin: Tuesday, Sept. 19 

Winter Program Freshmen: Monday, Nov. 20, 
4:20 p.m. in the Gymnasium. 
Upperclassmen: Monday, Nov. 
20, 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. in 
Registrar's Office 
Classes begin: Monday, Nov. 27 

Spring Program Freshmen: Monday, March 4, 
4:20 p.m. in the Gyirmasium. 
Upperclassmen: Monday, March 
4, 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Reg- 
istrar's Office 
Classes begin: Monday, March 1 1 

REQUIREMENTS FOR PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
CLASSES 

ATTENDANCE. All students are required to 
attend physical education classes three times per 
week. Two unexcused cuts are allowed during the fall 
and spring seasons and three during the winter season. 
Excessive cuts will result in automatic failure in 
physical education. 

GRADES. Grades are based almost wholly on 
attendance and attitude with Uttle emphasis placed on 



ability. Grades are Excellent, Satisfactory, and Un- 
satisfactory. Failure in a physical education course 
will entail a charge of $5.00 and the course will have 
to be made up in the senior year. 

APPAREL. A complete athletic uniform of sweat- 
shirt, T shirts, sweatsox, red shorts and gym shoes 
must be worn at all physical education classes. This 
uniform can be purchased at the time of fall registra- 
tion for freshmen, or during the year from the stock 
room in the basement of the gymnasium. 

REGISTRATION REQUIREMENTS 

VARSITY ATHLETES. Students may substitute 
work on varsity and junior varsity squads for the 
physical education requirements, and are responsible 
directly to the coaches for their attendance. Men 
who drop or are dropped from these squads must 
report to the Physical Education Office to register. 
Men taking varsity or junior varsity athletics for 
physical education credit must register according to 
the regular schedule. 

LATE REGISTRATION. Students who register 
after the scheduled dates will be subject to the late 
registration charge of $2.00. 

MEDICAL EXCUSE. Men whose physical con- 
dition prevents them from participation in athletics 
should see the Director of Physical Education to 
arrange some method of meeting the requirements. 
These men will be allowed to work as intercollegiate 
sports managers or to take extra work in the non- 
academic field. 



V 
Residence Halls and Food Services 




Topic Page 

Room Assignments 32 

Occupancy Schedules 32 

Change of Room Assignment 32 

Vacation Occupancy 32 

Fees 32 

Room Equipment 32 

Keys 33 

Lamps 33 

Bedboards 33 

Electrical Apphances 33 

Hot Plates 33 

Refrigerators 33 

Antennas 33 

Laundry Equipment 33 

Telephones 33 

Room Decoration 33 

Painting of Rooms 33 

Damages 33 

Damage Charges 34 

Repairs 34 

Maid Service 34 

Storage 34 

Firearms 34 

Pets 34 

Fire 34 

Grounds 34 

Security 34 

Insurance 34 

Inspection 35 

Seizure 35 

Search 35 

Dining Room Hours 35 

Private Dining Rooms 35 

Coop Hours 35 

Vending Machines 35 

Catering Services 35 

Special Diet Service 35 

Bryn Mawr - Haverford Meal Exchange 35 

Dining Room Guests 36 

Guest Meal Rates 36 

Refunds 36 

Vacation Food Service 36 

Dining Room Dress 36 

Dining Room Conduct 36 

Complaints, Suggestions, Improvements 36 



31 



32 



RESIDENCE HALLS AND FOOD SERVICES 



ROOM ASSIGNMENTS 

Rooms are assigned by the Dean of Students on 
the basis of priority numbers favoring upperclassmen. 



giving and mid-year vacations and for a pre-announced 
three or four days during Christmas and Spring vaca- 
tions. They are closed to all students during the 
majority of Christmas and Spring Vacations. 



OCCUPANCY SCHEDULES 

Rooms may be occupied on the day College opens 
at 1 :00 p.m. They must be relinquished by 4:00 p.m. 
on May 24th. Seniors are expected to vacate their 
rooms by 4:00 p.m. on Commencement Day, May 
28th. 



Students who live several hundred miles from cam- 
pus may request permission from the Dean of Stu- 
dents to remain on campus during Christmas and 
Spring vacations. One or two dormitories will be 
designated for vacation occupancy and students with 
permission to remain on campus will be assigned a 
room in one of the open dormitories. Permission is 
not given for reasons of study or term papers. 




CHANGE OF ROOM ASSIGNMENT 

A student may not transfer his room assignment 
without prior consent of the Dean of Students. If a 
student is permitted to move he must return the key 
of the room vacated and obtain a new key for the 
room he will occupy. A $2.00 charge is made when 
the student changes rooms. 

VACATION OCCUPANCY 

Dormitories are open to students during Thanks- 



FEES 

The room and board fee is due in two instaUments, 
on the first day of each semester. If a student vacates 
his room, no refund of room rental is made at any 
time unless the room is re-rented to a non-resident 
student. If a student vacates his room sometime 
during the first semester, he will not be Uable for a 
second semester room charge. 

ROOM EQUIPMENT 

If a student does not wish to use the room equip- 



RESIDENCE HALLS AND FOOD SERVICES 



33 



ment provided by the College he must notify the 
keymaster, who will arrange for such piece or pieces 
of equipment to be removed to storage. The cost for 
each piece of equipment to be moved or stored is 
S2.00. 

College mattresses may be used only on College 
bedframes. 

Personal rugs and furniture must be in good con- 
dition in order to comply with fire and sanitary 
regulations. All student furniture must be completely 
portable and free standing, and may not be attached 
to the walls, ceiling, or woodwork. 

KEYS 

Students are expected to have keys for their rooms. 
Keys are issued by the keymaster in each dormitory 
at the begiiming of the school year. There is a charge 
of $2.00 for the replacement of a lost key. Failure to 
return a key within ten days after the end of a 
semester will result in a S 1 0.00 key and lock cylinder 
replacement charge. 

LAMPS 

Study lamps can be obtained from the BuUdings 
and Grounds office for a deposit of $5.00 which will 
be refunded in full when the lamp is returned. Lamps 
must be returned at the end of the school year. 

BEDBOARDS 

Bedboards are available on the same basis as the 
study lamps. 

ELECTRICAL APPLL^VCES 

Only the following electrical items are acceptable: 
radio, phonograph, television, fan, electric razor, 
electric blanket, lamps, and electric iron (for use in 
laundry rooms only). 

HOT PLATES 

Hot plates are provided for the heating of coffee 
or soup in most dorms. No other cooking is permitted. 

REFRIGERATORS 

Refrigerators are permitted but are hmited as to 
size, use, and location. All refrigerators must be reg- 



istered in advance with the Buildings and Grounds 
Office. Specific regulations regarding the use and 
location of the refrigerators are issued when they are 
registered. 

College refrigerators may be rented for $15.00 per 
semester for use in the South and North Dorms. 

ANTENNAS 

The College does not allow the installation of wire 
antennas or connections between rooms or outdoors. 



LAUNDRY EQUIPMENT 

The College provides laundry equipment in the 
basements of Barclay, South Dorm, and the North 
Dorm. Irons may be borrowed from the keymaster. 



TELEPHONES 

Students may arrange, through the Buildings and 
Grounds office, to have private telephones instaDed 
in their rooms. A $50.00 deposit is required by the 
Bell Telephone Company. Residents of Lloyd, South 
Dorm, and North Dorm may use only the existing 
receptacles. 



ROOM DECORATION 

Articles may not be tacked, fastened or pasted 
with stickers to the walls, furniture, doors or fixtures. 
Jiffy hooks may be used only in those dorms without 
picture moldings in the waOs. Special hangers for use 
in the picture moldings are available in the bookstore. 

PAINTING OF ROOMS 

Dormitories are painted on a regular schedule. 
Excessive damage to the painting that requires either 
repainting or washing will result in a charge to the 
student. Students are not allowed to paint their 
rooms. 

DAMAGES 

The resident of each room is responsible for any 
damage to his room or contents, including windows, 
doors, and furniture, whether he is present or absent 
when the damage occurs. He may notify the Build- 



34 



RESIDENCE HALLS AND FOOD SERVICES 



ings and Grounds Office of the name of the person 
responsible for the damage. 

Because damage assessments are made against the 
occupant of the room at the time the damage is dis- 
covered, students are advised to note existing damages 
in instances of room change. The new occupant of a 
room is advised, for his own protection, to report, in 
writing, existing damages to the Buildings and Grounds 
Office. 

All rooms have been inspected prior to occupancy 
in the fall, and existing damages noted. 

The damage pohcies of the Students' Association 
apply to all areas outside the student room. 

DAMAGE CHARGES 

Charges for damages are based on the actual cost 
of materials, direct labor, and a standard overhead 
factor. A List of common charges is available in the 
Buildings and Grounds Office. 



REPAIRS 

Faculty equipment or trouble with heat, light, or 
water and damages should be reported to the Office 
of Buildings and Grounds or to the dorm keymaster 
as soon as discovered. 

MAID SERVICE 

Maids will clean the room and replace the linen 
once per week. During the interim students are asked 
to maintain their room in a reasonably orderly con- 
dition. Rooms in a chaotic condition wiU not be 
cleaned. It is suggested that, on cleaning day, students 
clear dressers and desk tops of papers they do not 
wish to have disturbed. 

STORAGE 

The storage section of each dormitory wiU be open 
on certain days at the beginning and ending of the 
school year. During other times students wishing to 
arrange for the opening of storage areas should con- 
tact their keymaster. 

Graduating students, and those students leaving 
the College, are not permitted to store any articles. 
The College does not accept any responsibility for 
loss or damage that might occur due to theft, fire, or 
any other cause. 



FIREARMS 

Operant firearms are forbidden on the campus. 

PETS 

Live animals are strictly prohibited although a- 
quariums are permissible. 

FIRE 

Tampering with fire alarm systems, fire fighting 
equipment, and the blocking of fire doors are serious 
offenses. These and other actions which constitute a 
hazard to the safety of others will result in severe 
disciplinary action. 

GROUNDS 

In order to preserve the beauty of the grounds, it 
is necessary to prohibit organized games in the areas 
surrounded by Lloyd, Union, Roberts, Barclay, 
Sharpless, HiUes, Gymnasium, Library, Founders, 
Hall Building, and Stokes Hall. 

SECURITY 

While every effort is made to protect the security 
of residents' rooms and storage areas, the College 
carmot be responsible for losses due to theft or other 
causes. It is strongly recommended that students' 
rooms be locked. Cases of theft should be reported 
immediately to the keymaster. 



INSURANCE 

The College is not responsible, directly or indirect- 
ly, for loss or damage to any article of property any- 
where on the campus due to fire, water, the elements, 
or action of third persons. It is recommended that 
insurance protection be carried by each student 
against loss or damage of personal property. The 
College offers fire insurance coverage on property of 
students on a blanket poUcy. 

Application for this must be made on proper form 
to the Office of the Comptroller within the first two 
weeks of the College year. In some instances, some 
protection is provided by the poUcies carried by the 
parents on their personal property. Each student 
should consult his insurance agent for advice. 



RESIDENCE HALLS AND FOOD SERVICES 



35 



INSPECTION 

The right and privilege is reserved to and by the 
College to enter the students' quarters at any time 
for the purpose of making inspections of the quarters 
and equipment, for enforcing the regulations con- 
tained in this handbook, or performing any main- 
tenance work which is needed. 



SEIZURE 

The right and privelege is reserved to and by the 

College to seize any illegal items which are visible. 
The student will be notified by campus mail, and all 
confiscated items will be held at the Buildings and 
Grounds Office for 48 hours after notification to 
allow appeal. 



COOP HOURS 

The Coop is open weekdays from 9:00 a.m. to 
2:00 p.m. and from 8:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m.; on 
Saturday from 8:00 a.m. until noon, and on Saturday 
evenings at hours to be announced. The Coop is 
closed on Sundays. 

VENDING MACHINES 

Candy and soft drink machines are located in the 
Union, Barclay, South Dorm, North Dorm, and Leeds 
basements. Should any machine fail to operate pro- 
perly, or should money be lost in the machine, the 
matter should be promptly reported to the Buildings 
and Grounds Office. Prompt refunds of lost money 
are give Uk^ 



SEARCH 

Searches entail investigation beyond what is visible. 
The right and privilege is reserved to and by the 
Students' Council to search the students' quarters at 
any time. A Council member and a College official 
must be present for all searches. 

DINING ROOM HOURS 



Saturday: 



Sunday: 



Breakfast 


7:30- 


-8:30 


Continental 






Breakfast 


8:30- 


-9:45 


Lunch 


11:30- 


-1:00 


Dinner 


5:15- 


- 6:45 


Breakfast 


8:30- 


-9:15 


Continental 






Breakfast 


9:15- 


-9:45 


Lunch 


12:00- 


-1:15 


Dinner 


5:15- 


-6:15 



PRIVATE DINING ROOMS 

The West, East Haverford, and Alumni Dining 
Rooms may be reserved for luncheon or dinner meet- 
ings. The Faculty Room may be reserved for dirmer 
meetings only. Reservations should be made in 
advance with the food manager. 

No charge is made if the regular cafeteria service 
is used. A 25)i per plate surcharge is made when the 
regular cafeteria menu is to be served by waiter; 
charges for special menus and service should be dis- 
cussed with the food manager. 



CATERING SERVICES FOR SPECIAL 
FUNCTIONS 

The food service makes available catering services 
at modest rates for student social events. Arrange- 
ments should be made well in advance of the event 
with the food manager, who will also aid in planning 
for use of facihties, equipment, and food services. 

SPECIAL DIET SERVICE 

A student requiring a special diet should obtain a 
letter from his physician and present this to the Food 
Manager, who will make aU arrangements. 

DINING ROOM EQUIPMENT 

Certain Dining Room equipment may be borrowed 
by students by contacting the food manager. Unless 
prior arrangements have been made, however, no 
equipment may be removed from the Dining Room. 
A charge of Sl.OO is made for each article of equip- 
ment found in Students' rooms. 



BRYN MAWR-HAVERFORD MEAL EXCHANGE 

Students with Bryn Mawr class schedules that 
make it difficult to return to Haverford for lunch can, 

DINING ROOM GUESTS 

Guests are welcome in the Dining Room. Guest 
and Day Student meal tickets can be purchased from 
the checker in the Dining Room. 



36 



RESIDENCE HALLS AND FOOD SERVICES 



by prior arrangement, take their lunch at Bryn Mawr, 
or have a box lunch prepared in advance, or have a 
late lunch in the Dining Room. Tickets for Bryn 
Mawr meals should be obtained from the Haverford 
food manager. 

Weekend meal exchanges may also be arranged on 
a limited basis by the Dining Room Committee. 



GUEST MEAL RATES 




Breakfast 


.70 


Lunch 


.95 


Dinner 


L35 


Sunday Dinner & 




Steak Dinner 


1.50 


REFUNDS 





Academic requirements which prevent a student 
from attending as many as three luncheons per week 
wiU entitle a student to receive a refund of 40^ per 
meal, subject to the approval of the dean of the Col- 
lege. These refunds must be requested the Monday 
following the meals missed at the Comptroller's 
Office. 

lUness, or absence from classes for any other 
reason, which extends for a period of more than 
four weeks will entitle a student to a prorated refund. 
No other refunds are possible. 

VACATION FOOD SERVICE 

The board fee does not include provision for food 
services when College is not in session. The last meal 
in the dining room is the meal nearest the hour when 



classes end. The first meal after a vacation period is 
breakfast on the day classes resume. 

The Coop will be open on a limited basis during 
Thanksgiving and mid-year recesses, and also during 
the evening before classes resume before all vacations. 

DINING ROOM DRESS 

Students are asked to help maintain a pleasant 
atmosphere in the dining room by wearing suitable 
attire. Gym suits, short shorts, and bare feet are 
therefore not permitted. Bermuda shorts, however, 
are. 

DINING ROOM CONDUCT 

Excessive noise or lack of consideration by a few 
can quickly destroy the pleasure of mealtime for 
many others. Minor incidents of undesirable conduct 
will result in expulsion from the dining room for a 
specified period of time without any refund of 
board fees. 



COMPLAINTS, SUGGESTIONS, IMPROVEMENTS 

The food service, in all its aspects, is solely in- 
tended to serve the students. It is therefore important 
that the food manager hear from students about their 
Kkes, dislikes, and suggestions for improvements. 

The Dining Room Committee is the primary 
vehicle for receiving and transmitting student com- 
ments about food service. The Dining Room manager, 
however, is always available to discuss these matters 
firsthand with the students. 



VI 
Student Services 




Topic Page 

Library 38 

Summer Employment 38 

Placement Service 38 

Graduate School Information 38 

Graduate School Catalogs 38 

Student Abroad 38 

Music Practice 38 

Bryn Mawr and Haverford Bus Service 38 

Scholarships 39 

Student Loans 39 

Student Employment 39 

Reading and Study Program 39 

Selective Service 39 

Infirmary 39 

Counseling Services 39 

Psychological Testing 40 

Accident Insurance 40 

Bookstore 40 

Check Cashing 40 

Guests— Weekend Dates 40 

Calendar 40 

Art Rental 40 

Lost and Found 40 

Ticket Sales 40 

Meeting Rooms 40 

Notary Public 40 

Concessions 40 



37 



38 



STUDENT SERVICES 



LIBRARY 

Special Note: Because of construction work 
in the Main Library, certain services may be 
curtailed during the first semester of the 
1967-68 academic year. 

The Library is open on weekdays from 8:00 a.m. 
to midnight, and on Sundays from 1:00 p.m. to 
midnight. In addition to the main Library, there are 
departmental libraries as follows: 

Math, Chemistry, and Physics - Stokes Hall 
Biology - Sharpless Hall 
Psychology - Sharpless Hall 
Music - Drinker Auditorium 
Astronomy — Strawbridge Observatory 
Engineering — Hilles 

The hours when these libraries will be avaOable 
vary, and are posted on the bulletin boards. 

Rules and information concerning the Library are 
printed in the Guide to the Haverford College Library. 
Every student receives a copy of this handbook and 
is expected to use it. 

SUMMER EMPLOYMENT 

The Dean of Students' Office maintains a central 
listing of summer job opportunities. 

PLACEMENT SERVICE 

The Alumni Office maintains a listing of pisitions 
open in business, industry, government, and institu- 
tions. Interviews with representatives from these 
areas can be arranged by consulting with the Director 
of Alumni Affairs. 

GRADUATE SCHOOL INFORMATION 

Students planning to go to professional schools 
may seek advice and information from appropriate 
faculty members as follows: 

Business Administration Mr. Teaf 

Education Mr. Lyons 

Engineering Mr. Hetzel 

Law Mr. Lane 

Medicine Mr. Cadbury 

Theology Mr. Spiegler 

Students planning to do graduate work in a 
departmental subject should consult with the chair- 
man of the department at Haverford. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL CATALOGS 

The catalogs of most colleges and universities in 
the United States are available for loan from the 
Registrar's Office. 

STUDY ABROAD 

A student who is interested in studying abroad 
should consult the Dean of the College. Up-to-date 
information on study in foreign universities is main- 
tained in his office in Founders Hall. 

MUSIC PRACTICE 

Practice rooms and pianos are available for stu- 
dents' vocal or instrumental practice. Interested stu- 
dents should contact Dr. Reese, the chairman of the 
Music Department. 

BRYN MAWR AND HAVERFORD 
BUS SERVICE 

The two colleges jointly operate a bus to facilitate 
cooperative classes, lectures, and library use. The bus 
makes regular trips between the two campuses on 
weekdays when classes are in session. The bus leaves 
from the Infirmary at Haverford, and from Pembroke 
Arch at Bryn Mawr. 

Leave Bryn Mawr Leave Haverford 

8:15 A.M. 8:45 A.M. 

9:15 A.M. 9:45 A.M. 




STUDENT SERVICES 



39 



10:15 A.M. 
11:15 A.M. 
12:15 P.M. 

1:15 P.M. 

2:15 P.M. 

3:15 P.M. 

4:15 P.M. 

5:15 P.M. 

7:15 P.M. 

9:45 P.M. 
10:30 P.M. 
(Wed. only) 



10:45 A.M. 
11:45 A.M. 
12:45 P.M. 

1 :45 P.M. 

2:45 P.M. 

3:45 P.M. 

4:45 P.M. 

5:45 P.M. 

7:45 P.M. 
10:15 P.M. 
10:45 P.M. 
(Wed. only) 



The bus may be chartered by student groups on 
weekends at the rate of S3. 00 per hour and 12^ per 
mile, provided a regular coUege driver is available. 
There is a minimum charge of S20.00. 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

AH scholarships for the current year have been 
previously awarded. Students wishing to apply for 
scholarships for 1968-69 should consult with Mr. 
Ambler before April 1968. 

STUDENT LOANS 

A loan fund is available for deserving students who 
may require financial assistance during their college 
course. Students wishing loan information should see 
Mr. Ambler. 

STUDENT EMPLOYMENT 

There are several opportunities for student em- 
ployment in the Library, as clerical assistants for 
faculty and administrative officers, as research aids, 
and in the Dining Room. In most instances, prior 
consideration is given to students with financial need. 
Students interested in campus employment should 
register in the Dean of Students' Office. 



READING AND STUDY PROGRAM 

A special reading and study skills program will be 
offerred by the College for a five-week period during 
the FaU semester. Students who have not had special 
reading and study instruction or guidance are urged 
to consider this program, since most students have 
found it possible to develop their reading and study 



skills considerably beyond their present levels. A 

special fee of S70.00 is charged for the program. 

In addition to this special program, the College 

counselors are available for individual consultation. 



SELECTIVE SERVICE 

Students are required by law to register for 
Selective Service on or within five days after their 
18th birthday. This may be done through the Dean of 
Students. In order that the proper forms may be sent 
to the Selective Service each year, each student should 
notify the dean of his Selective Service number and 
address of his local Selective Service Board. The 
forms sent by the College verify the student's 
eUgibiUty for deferment. 

Students who intend to be conscientious objectors 
are invited to consult with Professor Cary or Mr. 
James Vaughan. 

INFIRMARY 

The dispensary is open from 8:00 to 10:00 a.m., 
1:00 to 3:00 p.m., and 6:30 to 8:00 p.m. Monday 
through Saturday; and Sundays 10:00 to 11:00 a.m.; 
for routine office calls. Emergencies will be taken 
care of at any time. 

The College physician is available at the infirmary 
from 2:00 to 3:00 p.m. Monday through Friday and 
wQl be called by the nurse on duty if needed at other 
times. 

Visiting hours for patients in the infirmary are 
between 2:00 and 4:00 p.m., and 6:00 and 8:00 p.m. 
daily. 

Emergency phone nights and weekends is 
MI 2-3133. The infirmary is closed during vacations. 



COUNSELING SERVICES 

The College offers counseling for problems of a 
vocational, educational, or personal nature. Students 
are encouraged to make an appointment with any one 
of the counselors for an evaluation of his problem. 
He will usually be advised by the person he consults. 
When a problem warrants it, he will be referred to 
another member of the staff, or occasionally to an 
outside source for further help. 

AH student communications with the counsehng 
staff are held in strict professional confidence, as are 
the names of students counseled. 



40 



STUDENT SERVICES 



The counseling staff consists of a psychiatrist, Dr. 
Peter Bennett, and two clinical psychologists, Mrs. 
Judith Katz, and Mr. James Vaughan. Appointments 
with Dr. Bennett should be made with nurse at the 
the Infirmary. Appointments with Mrs. Katz and Mr. 
Vaughan should be made at their offices in Rooms 3 
and 5, Sharpless Hall. 

PSYCHOLOGICAL TESTING 

The records of the psychological tests which each 
student takes during Customs Week are available in 
the Counseling Offices. Any student desiring an ex- 
planation of them may ask for an appointment with 
either Mrs. Katz or Mr. Vaughan. 

Students who desire counseling in regard to majors 
or vocational plans may ask to take supplementary 
tests of aptitudes, interests, or personality. 

ACCIDENT INSURANCE 

Every student is covered by a blanket accident 
policy paid for from the unit fee. This insurance pays 
actual expenses resulting from any accident up to a 
limit of $1000 for each accident. All claims under 
this policy should be directed to the College phy- 
sician. 

BOOKSTORE 

The book store, located in the Union, is open 
from 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Monday through 
Friday. Extended hours are announced during the 
beginning of each semester. 

CHECK CASHING 

The cashier's window, located in HUles, is open to 
cash student checks from 10:15 a.m. to 11:45 a.m. 
Monday through Friday. 



GUESTS - WEEKEND DATES 

On festive weekends, a representative of the Stu- 
dents' Council, arranges for rooms in faculty homes 
and at Bryn Mawr for students' out-of-town dates. 
The faculty do not expect renumeration for this 
service, but students should observe the following 
suggestions: 

1. The faculty hostess should be contacted as 
soon as possible. She should be given the name and 
home address of the girl who is expected to stay with 
her, and the approximate times of her arrival and 
departure. 



2. The hostess should be kept informed of any 
changes in the girl's plans. 

3. Thank-you notes are appreciated. 

CALENDAR 

The central Calendar of Events is maintained in 
the Office of the Dean of Students. All campus 
extra-curricular activities are registered in this office. 
A Calendar of Events is pubUshed weekly by the 
Students' Council and distributed throughout the 
campus. 

ART RENTAL 

The College has a collection of framed prints 
which are rented to students at a very nominal rate. 
Announcements will be made in the fall about when 
students may make selections from this collection. 

LOST AND FOUND 

Items lost or found should be reported to the 
Buildings and Grounds office. This office periodically 
posts Hsts of lost and found items. Items believed 
stolen may be reported either to the Buildings and 
Grounds Office or to the dorm keymaster. 

TICKET SALES 

The Dean of Students' Office maintains a central 
ticket office service for campus organizations. When 
tickets are not being directly sold by student sales- 
men, reservations can be made in the Dean of Stu- 
dents' Office. 

MEETING ROOMS 

The Council Room in the Union is available for 
meetings of campus organizations when not in use by 
the Students' Council. Other meeting rooms can be 
reserved in the Dean of Students' Office. 

NOTARY PUBLIC 

A Notary PubUc is provided for the convenience of 
students in the Comptroller's Office and in the Reg- 
istrar's office. The standard $1.00 charge Ms made for 
the service. 
CONCESSIONS 

Each year the Students' Council awards certain 
selling concessions to students. Except by special 
permit, no other soliciting or selling is allowed on 
campus. Generally, student concessions are allowed 
only for items not made available by the Book Store 
and the Coop. Any student may start a new con- 
cession by applying to the Council Secretary. 



INDEX 



41 



Absence from classes 24 

Academic flexibility 24 

Academic freedom 20 

Academic standards 22 

Academic Standing Committee 23 

Accident insurance 40 

Activities calendar 40 

Address changes 25 

Advisors, graduate studies 38 

Alcoholic beverages 18 

A.I.E.S.E.C 4 

Alumni Committee 2 

Alumni Fraternities- see Triangle, Beta Rho Sigma 

"Any Act" Clause 12 

Appliances, dormitories 33 

Art rental 40 

Art Series-see Art Series Committee 

Art Series Committee 2 

Athletics 28, 29 

Attendance at classes 24 

Attendance at Collection 24 

Automobile regulations 25, 26 

Banquets- see Catering services 

Beds, Bedboards 33,34 

Beta Rho Sigma 6 

Big Brother Committee 2 

Bookstore 40 

Box office 40 

Brass Ensemble 4 

Bryn Mawr information- see Bryn Mawr section 

in Directory 
Bus schedule 38 

Calendar Committee 2 

Calendar of Events 40 

Campus jobs 39 

Campus organizations, recognition and financing of 4 

Captains, varsity teams 28 

Car registration 25 

Cashier's office 40 

Catering services 35 

Change of home address 25 

Change of room assignment 32 

Check cashing 40 

Chess Club 4 

Class attendance 24 

Class Night 4 

Class Night Committee 2 

Cleaning of dorm rooms 34 

Code of Student Responsibility 18 

Collection, attendance at 24 

Collection Committee 2 

College's name, use of 25 

Committee appointments 2 

Committee chairmen and members- 
see individual committee listings 

Committees, faculty 4, 23 

Committees, Students' Council 2 

Complaints, food 36 

ComptroUer's Office 34, 36, 40 



Concessions 40 

Conduct, community life 18, 34 

Conduct, dining room 36 

Constitution, Students' Association 6-9 

Constitution, Students' Association-amendments 9 

Controversial subjects 20 

Cooking, dormitories 33 

Coop, hours 35 

Counseling services 39 

Course Evaluation Committee 2 

Cultural Committee 3 

Customs Committee 3 

Damages 19, 21, 33, 34 

Dances food service 35 

Dates, accomodations 40 

Deadline, motor vehicle registration 25 

Deadline, term papers 24 

Decals for motor vehicles 26 

Decoration, dorm rooms 33 

Departmental libraries 38 

Dining room complaints 36 

Dining Room Committee 3 

Dining room, conduct 36 

Dining room, dress 36 

Dining room, equipment 35 

Dining room, guests 36 

Dining room guests, meal rates 36 

Dining room hours 35 

Dining room meal tickets 35, 36 

Dining rooms, private 35 

Dining room, refunds 36 

Dining room, special diet 35 

Dining room, vacations 36 

Dirmer meetings 34 

DiscipHnary policy 19 

Dormitories, appliances 33 

Dormitory, damages 33, 34 

Dormitory, decoration 33 

Dormitory occupancy schedules 32 

Dormitory, pets 34 

Dormitory regulations 33 

Draft registration 39 

Drama Club 4 

Dress, dining room 36 

Dress, physical education 29 

Drinking 18 

Dropped courses 23 

Drugs 19, 21 

Electrical appliances 33 

Eligibility, intercollegiate sports 28 

Emergency, infirmary 39 

Employment, campus 39 

Employment, summer 39 

Examinations, final 3, 14 

Expansion Committee 3 

Faculty advisors, graduate schools 38 

Faculty committees 23 



42 



INDEX 



Faculty committees, students on 4 

Faculty dining room 35 

Faculty-student relations 18 

Failed courses 22 

Fees, room and board 32 

Fifth Day Meeting 22 

Fifth Day Meeting Committee 3 

Final Examinations 3, 14 

Final Examinations Committee 3 

Financial aid 39 

Fines, traffic 26 

Fire alarms 34 

Fire insurance 34 

Firearms 34 

Flexibility, academic 24 

Food Committee 3 

Forced entry .21 

Freedom of organization 20 

Furniture, dormitory 33 

Gambling 25 

Games on grounds 34 

Glee Club 4 

Grades physical education 29 

Grades, Grading 22 

Grading procedures 23 

Graduate school information 38 

Grounds, regulations 34 

Guest housing 40 

Guest meal rates, dining room 36 

Guests, dining room 36 

Guests, out-of-town dates 40 

Haverford College Varsity Marching Society and 

Auxiliary Fife, Drum, and Kazoo Corps 4 

The Haverford News 5 

Home address, change of 25 

Honor System Committee 3 

Honor System, Constitutional standards 9,12 

Honor System, Interpretations 12 

Academic 13 

Women Guests 13 

Final Exams 14 

Honor System, recent changes 14 

Honor System, Regulations 12 

Hours, bookstore 40 

Hours, cashier 40 

Hours, Coop 35 

Hours, dining room 35 

Hours, infirmary 39 

Hours, library 38 

Infirmary 39 

Inspection of rooms 35 

Insurance 34, 40 

Intercollegiate athletics and eligibility 28 

Intramural athletics 28 

Irons 33 

Keymaster 33, 34, 40 

Keys 33 



Lamps 33 

Laundry equipment 33 

Laws concerning drug use 21 

Libraries, departmental 38 

Library 38 

Library hours 38 

Letters, varsity 29 

Literary magazine 5 

Loans 39 

Loss of money, vending machines 35 

Lost and found 40 

Lost room key 33 

Maid service 34 

Major, selection of , 24 

Meal exchange, Haverford-Bryn Mawr 35 

Meal tickets, guests and day students 36 

Medical excuse, physical education 29 

Meeting 22 

Meeting Committee 3 

Meeting rooms 40 

Membership, campus organizations 4 

Membership, Council committees 2 

Minimum passing grades 22 

Modem Dance Club 5 

Motor vehicle regulations 25, 26 

Music practice 38 

New organizations 4 

Newspaper 5 

Notary public 40 

Orchestra 5 

Paid political activities 21 

Painting, rooms 33 

Parking Regulations 25 

Peddling 25 

Pets 34 

Phi Betta Kappa 6 

Physical Education Requirements 28, 29 

Placement Service 38 

Policy Committee 3 

Political Freedom 20, 21 

Psychological Testing 40 

Radio Station- see W H R C 

Rapid Reading Course 39 

Reading & Study Program 39 

The Record 5 

Refunds, Missed Meals 36 

Registration, Campus Events 21, 15 

Registration, Motor vehicle 25 

Registration, Physical Education 29 

Registration, Varsity Athletics 29 

Relationship with Law Enforcement Agencies 20 

Repairs 34 

Residence Requirements 22 

The Revue 5 

Room & Board Fees 32 



INDEX 



43 



Room Assignments 32 

Change of 32 

Room Decoration 33 

Room Equipment & Furniture 32, 33 

Room Inspection & Search 35 

Room Keys 33 

Room Repairs 34 

Sailing Club 5 

Scholarships 39 

Schuetz Singers 5 

Search of Rooms 35 

Security 34 

Seizure of Property 35 

Selective Service 39 

Selling 25 

Social Action Committee 5 

Social Committee 3 

Soliciting 25 

Special Diet Service 35 

Speed Limits 26 

Storage 34 

Student Employment 39 

Student Loans 39 

Students' Association 2 

Students' Association, General Regulations 21 

Students' Association, plenary session 6,7,8,9 

Students' Council 2 

Students' Council, Committees 2 

Students' Council, elections & voting procedure 7,8 

Students' Council, Interpretations of Regulations . .9. 12, 13 

Students' Council, Officers & Members 2 

Students' Council, removal of members 8, 9 

Students' Council, Rules & Regulations 6, 8 

Students' Council, vacancies 8 

Summer Employment 38 

Swimming Tests 28 

Tables of Contents 

Student Government 1 

Honor System 10 

Campus Guidelines 17 

Athletics 27 

Residence Halls & Food Services 31 

Student Services 37 

Term Paper Deadlines 24 

Theft-see Security 

Ticket Sales 40 

Triangle 6 

Unit Fee, use of 4 

Use of College Name 25 

Vacation Dorm Occupancy 32 

Vacation Food Service 36 

Vacation Policies 22 

Vacations 22 

Varsity Club 5 

Vending Machines 35 



Weekend Dates, Housing . . 
WHRC 

Wombats-see Maid Service 

Yearbook-see Record 



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EMERGENCY PHONE NUMBERS 



Fir.' 
Police 



649-4200 
Ml 2-7700 



CAMPUS PAY PHONES 



Barclay — 1st flooi 
Barclay - 3rtl floor 
r i ' ;. Center 



FreiKh House - 2nd floor 

Jones Hall - T 

Leeds Hall - i 

Lunt Hall - Basen>ent 

Lyman Baecher Hall BIdy. 

Power House 

Sharpless Hall - 1st floor (Biology) 
Sharpless Hall - 3rd floor (Ptychologv 

Stokes Hall - 1st floor 

Union — 1st floor 
Williams House - ^nn tioor 
Yarnall House 



Ml 2-9524 
Ml 2-9506 
Ml 2 9521 
Ml 9 9730 
Ml 2 9613 
Ml 2 9497 
Ml 2 9532 
Ml 9 9739 
Ml 2 9572 
Ml 2 9540 
Ml 2 9639 
Ml 2 9626 
Ml 2 9591 
Ml 2 9514 
Ml 2 9428 
Ml 2 9595 



I 



BOARD OF MANAGERS 1968-1969 







ROBERT L. BALDERSTON 



DAVID C.BEVAN 



JOHN H. BUSH 



STEPHEN G.CARY 







MAXWELL DANE 



THOMAS ELKINTON 



J. MORRIS EVANS 



JOHN F. GUMMERE 
SECY. OF CORPORATION 







GAYLORD P. HARNWELL THOMAS B. HARVEY 



GARRETT S. HOAG 



ARTHUR R. KANE, JR. 







JAMES P. MAGI LL 
VICE CHAIRMAN 



WM. MORRIS MAIER 
TREASURER 



J. HOWARD MARSHALL LOUIS R. MATLACK 



Managers Emeriti 



EDWARD W. EVANS HENRY C.EVANS 

HAROLD EVANS DR. FREDERIC C. SHARPLESS 



BOARD OF MANAGERS 1968-1969 







WILLIAM F.MAXFIELD DR. JONATHAN E. RHOADS PHILIP G. RHOADS ARTHUR S. ROBERTS 

CHAIRMAN 







ROBERT P. ROCHE GERALD RORER HENRY SCATTERGOOD JOHN A. SILVER 







F.JOSEPH STOKES, JR. DR. JOSEPH STOKES, JR. DR. S. EMLEN STOKES DANIEL D. TEST, JR. 





JOHN C. WHITEHEAD RICHARD R. WOOD 



Faculty Representatives to the Board of Managers 



Alternates: 
HARMON C. DUNATHAN ROBERT M. GAVIN, JR. 

SIDNEY I. PERLOE ROGER LANE 




FACULTY-STAFF 1968-1969 








W.W. AMBLER L. ANASTASI M. ASENSIO J. ASHMEAD W. F. BAUTHASER E. W. BATSON 










T. A. BENHAM P. G. BENNET R.BERNSTEIN E. BOGART 



E. BRONNER 





MM 






R. H. BUTMAN W. W. CADBURY J. CARY 



J. P. CHESICK T. S. CHIA 



J. R.COLEMAN 











H. COMFORT F.X.CONNOLLY 



B.COOK 



G. COUCH 



M.E.CRAIG T. J. D'ANDREA 









W. C. DAVIDON J.H.DAVISON F. DE GRAAFF P. DESJARDINS W. DOCHERTY H. C. DUNATHAN 








{.FINGER 



F. S. FUSSNER A. GANGADEAN 



/r mm -^:h °:^ 

R.M.GAVIN L. GERSTEIN 




D. J. GILLIS 



FACULTY-STAFF 1968 - 1969 








AST 


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H. GLICKMAN E. GOLDBERGER E.U.GREEN L.C.GREEN 



£^^ 



S. GUBINS M. M.GUTWIRTH 




A. P. HARE 








T. B. HETZEL H. HUNTER 



H. HUNTER D. HUSEMOLLER 




C. HYSLOP 





R.P. JAYNE 



R. H. KANE 






G. KANNERSTEIN J. KATZ 



D. KESSLER 



at3jasga 53 gag3 BiMa»tti»ff»ttiM BgBSffii 






V.H.KLINE L. A. KOSWIAN 





D. KRAINES 






^^d 




V.Q. KRAMER Y. LANDAU W.W.LANDER 








,. ''>' 



R. LANE 



m 



J. A. LESTER 



A. LEVINE 



A. G. LOEWY 



J.B.LONG R. J. LUBARSKY 









J.W.LYONS W. MACCAFFREY W. MAC GAFFEY C. F. MAC KAY S. J. MANDELBAUM M.MARSHALL 



FACULTY-STAFF 1968 - 1969 





E.M.MICHAEL G.MICHAEL 






S. I. PERLOE 



C.PERRY 




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E. RALPH 








j;s<;. 






D.MILLER R.A.MORTIMER M. OXMAN 




D.POTTER E. PRUDENTE 




R.E.RANDALL J.C.RANSOM R.R.RASKIN 



W. H. REESE 



J. RINGOLD 





B. ROBINSON 







St- 



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M. SANTER R.M.SARGENT A. SATTERTHWAITE 



G.A. SAYER 




l«»«f. 



F. A. SELOVE 







D. QUINN 




F. J. QUINN 



'w^^^■-;^ ^ **Si5Jt> 





T. RAWSON 



R. REESE 





E. S. ROSE H. L. ROSENZWEIG P. B. ROWE 





S. SCHNAARS 





W. A. SHAFER W. E.SHEPPARD M. K. SHOWE S. M. SHUMER C. P. SLATER 



398 



FACULTY-STAFF 1968 - 1969 





C.W.SMITH G. SPIEGLER 






J. SPIELMAN 





/^ 



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i 



^1 




S. STOWE 



D. SWAN 



H.TEAF 








C.R.THOMPSON J.THOMPSON W. J. TRELA J. L. VAUGHAN 



t^ 







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^Tb J^M i¥fe 



S. R.WALDMAN 



C. C. WALDT 




B. WALLACE 



P. E.WEHR 



E. YAROSH 



J. E.YEAGER O. C. ZAFIRIOU 



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1. ACKELSBERG 


R. K. AGARWAL 




1972 


1969 






&^ 


1 



R. B. AIRD 
1970 



J. A. ALBINO 
1972 



J. B.ALLEN 
1970 



J. L. ALLEN 
1970 





M. H.ALLEN 
1972 



D.J. ALTER 
1971 



R.S.ANDERSON 
1969 



^k 



T. R.ANDERSON 
1972 





W. W. ANDREWS 
1971 



IMS 

D. E. ARINSBERG 
1971 








R. B.ARMSTRONG 
1969 



R. B. ARNER 
1972 



A. ASBERRY 
PB 



J. AVERICK 
1970 




Hi> Jii ^M 






B. G 


AYCOX 
PB 


1 


1 



R. R. BACHMAN 
1971 





S. O. BAILEY 
1969 



B. D. BAIRD 
1972 



J. N. BAKKE 
1970 



P.J. BALINT 
1971 



L. BALLARD 
1972 





A. L. BALTER 
1972 



D. R. BANKS 
1972 



E.G. BARANANO 
1969 









M.S. BARNETT 
1969 



J. BARRETT 
1969 




%v 



D. M. BARRY 
1969 



S. W. BARRY 
1971 



A. H. BARTELS 
1971 



S. L. BARTON 
1971 



S. E. BARTON 
1971 




A. L. BARUFFI 
1972 




S. W. BATZELL 
1971 




D. A. BERG 
1971 




E. V. BONADUCE 
1971 




d^ 



D. C. BRASSFIELD 
1971 






R. B. BEALE 
1969 




H. BERLISS 
1970 




L. E. BIRD2ELL III 
1970 




W. K. BRAUCHER 
1969 




S. BROWN 
1970 



E. G. BECKWITH 
1971 




D. H. BERNARD 
1972 




A. D. BLISTEIN 
1971 




M. P. BOTTALICO 
1972 




D. R. BRENNER 
1971 




.^f¥ .^ 



B. M. BROWNELL 
1972 




1 r 



D. F. BERRY 
1971 




R. L. BOGEN 
1972 




R.J. BOULWARE 
PB 




D. M. BRIN 
1972 




R. BRYAN, JR. 
1972 




E. H. BETZ 
1972 




J. R. BOWER 
1969 




F. BRISELLI 
1970 




T. S. BRYSON 
1971 



W. P. BICKLEY 
1969 





D. H. BOYER 
1970 





A. M. BURKE 
1971 



I 




J. B. BUTLER, JR. 
1972 




T.J. CHAPIN 
1972 




T. L. CLOUGH 
1971 






S. J. CALLAHAN 
1970 




ii^4^ 



R. A. CHAPMAN 
1972 




A. F. COLBERT 
1972 




F. H. CONROY 
1970 





D.W.CARTER 
1971 




E. P. CHESTER 
1971 




J. D.COOK 
1969 





D. CASEY 
1972 




J. A. CHEWNING 
1971 




R. M.COLE 
1971 




D. W. COTLOVE 
1972 






R.J. CHANDLER 
1970 




S. H. CLARK 
1972 




P. K. COLEMAN 
1970 




B.J.CRAIG 
1971 








E. F. CHANEY 
1969 




S. H. CLEARMAN 
1972 




J. A. COLLAR 
1971 




R. B. CRAWFORD 
1971 




S.W. CROPPER 


D. W. CROSS 


G.J. CSORDAS 


E. CULLANDER 


J. CZARNINSKI 


A. DAS 


1969 


1970 


1972 


1972 


1970 


1970 



I 




J. L. DAVIDSON 
1971 



E. H. DAVIS 
1970 



^\M 



F.J. DAVIS 


J. W. DECKER 


J. R. DEKLEWA 


J.W.DELANO 


1970 


1971 


1971 


1971 




C. DEMATATIS 
1970 




R. L. DIRECTOR 
1971 




m 



A. B. DUNHAM 
1969 





S, M. EISDORFER 
1971 




^m^ 



R.J. ENGEL 
1969 



T. A. DENNY 
1970 




W. W. DONNER 
1972 




J. S. ELKINTON 
1970 


1 


^ 




"m 




^ 


^ 


f^ 




D. M. DENTON 
1971 




£9^^ ^ H^H 



D. S. DOUGLAS 
1972 




D. F. ELLIOTT 
1969 





W. A. DE VRIES 
1972 




N. T. DOWNS 
1969 




R. L. EASTON, JR. 
1972 




D. L. EMANUEL 
1972 




^'^'^- 



k 




S. S. DIAMOND 
1971 




J. W. DRURY 
1972 




A. K. EDELSTON 
1971 




G. A. EMMETT 
1972 





J. A. DICKINSON 
1970 




H. L. DUNCAN 
1972 




K. C. EDGAR 
1969 




J. R. EMMONS 
1970 




S. T. ERB 
1970 



T. L. ERICKSON 
1971 



D. M. ESPO 
1971 



D. W. EVANS 
1971 



N. R. EVANS 
PB 




P. T. EWELL 
1970 





K. D. FARSHTEY 
1972 




J. L. FEIN 
1972 




B. K. FEROE 
1971 



s 




G. D. FERREE 
1971 







H. B. FINKEL 
1971 




J.J. FLUCK 
1972 




W. FORMAN 
1969 




R. FREUND 
1969 




T. 


, FUJII 




1970 




l! 


^„ 




K 


y- 


j^lHf 




mi 



W. B. GEFTER 
1970 





S. P. FINKLESTEIN 
1970 




D. W. FOSTER 
1969 




B. C. FREY 
1969 





^1 



D. E. GANN 
1972 




J. P. GEISE, JR. 
1969 



D. E. FINLEY 
1972 




R.C. FOLEY 
1971 




D. H. FOSTER 
1969 




D. R. FRIED 
1972 





M. H. GARBER 
1972 




S. R. GERBER 
1969 




G. P. FISHBEIN 
1970 



im 




J. D. FOLLET 
1969 




D. S. FRANKEL 
1969 




B. R. FROEHLKE 
1971 




" / 



P. P. GARRETSON 
1969 




G. A. GIBBS, JR. 
1972 




V. T. FOREHAND 
1969 




C. I. FREEDMAIM 
1972 




D. E. FRY 
1970 




R. E. GARRETT 
1969 





S. L. FORMAN 
1971 




R. A. FRENCH 
1970 




B.S. GARTON 
1972 





M 



W. R. GILCRIST 
1971 



J. T. GILL 
1971 




p. M. GILMER 
1971 




T. B. GOLDING 
1969 




M. J. GREENFIELD 
1970 





T. C. GJENVICK 
1972 




M. H. GOLDMAN 
1971 




R. R. GREENFIELD 
1971 



J. R.GLEESON III 
1969 




R. S. GOODMAN 
1971 




G. H. GREENSPAN 
1972 




J. K. GODBEY, JR. 
1969 



i«L J 




p. A. GORSKI 
1970 




J.S. GREGG 
1969 




B. I. GODEREZ 
1971 




T. L. GOWEN, JR. 
1971 




W. G. GRESOV 
1969 




P. D. GOLDBERGER 
1971 




D.J. GREEN 
1970 




B. M. GRIFFIN 
1972 




B. L. GRIFFIN 
1972 




P. C. HALLAWELL 
1972 




J. L. HARPER 
1972 





E. K. GRIWIMELMANN 
1971 




C. E. HALLICK 
1972 




H.J. H. HARRIS 
1969 



S. L. GROSS 
1972 




D. L. HAMILTON 
1970 




T. W. HARRIS, JR. 
1972 




P. H. HAGGEN 
1972 




Ain^ 



C. L. HAMM 
1972 




M.J. HARRISON 
1970 




P. B. HALES 
1972 





R. H. HAMMEL 
1969 




P. C. HART 
1971 




w. 


R. HALL 




1971 


i 


p 


2 


IpL 



P. S. HANDFORD 
1970 




W. R. HARVEY 
1971 




H, W. HASKELL 
1972 




C. L. HEDRICK 
1970 




D. A. HEPNER 
1971 




^Fik 



p. D. HIRSH 
1972 




B. W. HASTINGS 
1971 




M. E. HELLER 
1972 




tfiL 



P.J. HERRMANN 
1971 





R. C. HAWLEY 
1969 




E. A. HELME 
1969 




P.J. HERZBERG 
1972 





J. D. HAYDEN, JR. 
1971 




G. W. HELME IV 
1972 




K. A. HICKS 
1970 





J. M. HAYES 
PB 




J. HENDERSON 
1969 





C.J. HEATON, JR. 
1971 




ATTT 
P. F. HENSLEY 
1972 




W. R. HOBSON 
1971 



P. B. HODGES 
1971 



F.J. HOENEMEYER 
1971 



A. T. HOOK 
1969 



T. M. HOOPES 
1971 




C. S. HORNE 
1971 




M. L. HUMPHRIES 
1970 




i'^^ ^^^ J 



W. R. HORNER 
1970 




B. E. HUNTER 
1972 




J. B. HOSTER 
1969 




H.T. HURD 
1971 




G.J. HOUGH, JR. 
1972 




G. K. HURLEY 
1970 




A 



W. A. HUTCHINS 
1970 




M. E. HUIBREGTSE 
1971 




B. C. lACOBUCCI 
1970 




R. IHRIE, JR 
1970 




J. W. IVES 
1972 




^fk 



S. A. JAROCKI 
1969 




P.T.JOHNSTONE 
1969 




S. M. KASTNER 
1972 





R. S. INGRAM 
1972 




G. W. JACKSON 
1969 




R. K. JARVIS 
1970 




J /■ 
S. M.JONES 
1970 




R. S. KATZ 
1972 





W. C. INGRAM 
1970 




J. L. JACKSON 
1969 




D.W.JENKINS 
1971 




S.S.JONES 
1971 




A. KATZMAN 
1969 





J. W. INSLEE 
1970 




T. A. JACKSON 
PB 




G. L. JERANEK 
1970 




W. A. JUCH 
1972 



^"^k. 



P. KAUFFMAN 
1970 





M. R. INVER 
1971 




H. M. JACOBSON 
1971 




D. H.JOHNSON 
1971 




M. A. KAMARCK 
1971 





S.J. KAUFMAN 
1970 




J. A. KELEMEN 
1972 



H. D. KELLY, JR. 
1972 



C.J. KERR 
1972 



R. H. KIMBALL 
1969 



R. A. KIMMICH, JR. 
1971 




A. M. IRVING 
1970 




H. A. JAFFEE 
1970 




K. A. KAMM 
1969 




S. T. KEENAN 
1969 




M. R. KLEINMAN 
1972 




J. KLEPPINGER 
1969 




P. L. KRAUSE 
1972 




K. E. LANGLEY 
1969 




^Tk 



T. E. LAWSON 
1972 




G. E. LEWIS 
1972 




^J 



S. C. LINDSAY 
1972 




J. KLUGE 
1970 




T. M. KRIEGER 
1969 




G. F. LANSON 
1971 




D. W. LAZAROFF 
1969 




b tflk 



J. A. LEWIS 
1971 





R.E. KOEPPE II 
1971 




H. M. KRITZER 
1969 




C. LAQUER 
1971 




J. E. LEWIS, JR. 
1970 



M. C. LINDSEY 
1969 





T. R. KOVARIC 
1971 




J. S. KROMER 
1971 




N. L. LARSON 
1969 




J. F. LEHMAN 
1969 




R. H. LEWIS 
1970 






S. G. KOZEY 
1972 




T. A. KUNZ 
1971 




J. A. LAURENCE 
1969 




CO. LERCHE 
1972 




R. A. LIGHTBODY 
1969 




J. C. KRAUSE 
1972 




B. E. LAMB 
1972 




W. A. LEVIN 
1972 




B. K. LINCOLN 
1970 




E. D. LISTER 
1970 



F. A. LONG II 
1969 



W. P. LOUGH REY 
1972 




A. C. LOUIE 




1970 



S. LOUIE 
1971 




K. D. LUDWIG 
1972 




S. A. MAC DONALD D.S.MACLEAN 

1972 1971 





M. C. MANNING 
1972 



W. S. MARGE 
1971 





H. D. MASON 
1969 



J. T. MASON 
1972 




M d 






M. W. LOVE 
1972 



S. LOVENWORTH 
1971 





V. LUKETIC 
1969 




i 




A. L. MARINO 
1972 




J. A. MASON 
1971 




J. A. LYCETT 
1972 



Iff— ■ ■• 




A. M. MAGUN M. B. MAHON 

1972 1971 




S. A. MARRINSON 
1970 




H. P. MASSIE 
1970 






F. V. LOWE, JR. 
1969 



A. B. LOWRY 
1971 





M.S. MACCLAREN 
1971 




J. R. MAIER 
1971 



W. B. MANN 
1972 





D. S. MARSHALL 
1969 



T. W. MASLAND 
1972 





T. A. MCCAIN 
1970 



G. R. MCCONNELL 
1969 





H. L. MC CURTIS 
PB 



A. C. MC HARG 
1972 



R.S. MC KEE 
1972 



M. K. MC LEMORE 
1971 



K. S, MCMURTREY 
1972 



T. R. MEIER 
1969 




E. D. MELBY 
1970 




W. O. MILES II 
1970 




J. MULLINS 
PB 





R. B. NORRIS 
1971 




S. M. MELTZER 
1972 




M. A. MILLER 
1970 




S.J. MURPHY 
1970 



i^k ^ 





p. M. MELVIN 
1971 




M. R. MILLER 
1970 




A. C. MORGAN 
1970 




J. D. MYERS 
1971 






R. G. MERKLER 
1971 



C. G. METZGER 
1972 





R.A.MILLER 
1971 



S. E. MILLER 
1971 





P. H. MORRISON 
1972 



P. L. MORROW 
1971 





J. W. NEAL 
1970 



P. E. NEWBURGER 
1970 




i^f^ 









R.S. MIDGETT 
1972 




L. MILLHOFER 
1971 




R. C.MORROW 
1972 




S. R. NEWCOMB 
1971 




A. D. NEWKIRK G.C.NEWMAN D.E.NICHOLSON J.D.NICHOLSON T. B. NICKEL K. E. NORDINE, JR. 

1969 1970 1972 1970 1970 1972 





D.J. NOVAK 
1970 



S. K. OBERHOLTZER 
1972 



J. R. O'DONNELL 
1972 



F. K. O'HARA 
1972 



M. J. O'LEARY 
1970 



TO^- 






R. B. OLVER 
1969 



D. R. ORAN 
1970 




S. L. OREFICE 
1971 



R. L. H.ORLANDO 
1969 






«r 




J. C. OTTENBERG J.C.OWENS J. A. A. PABARUE, JR. T. PACE 

1970 1971 1972 1972 




T. A. PANCOAST 
1970 




H.C 


. PERRY 
1971 


J 





J. S. POBER 
1971 




A.J. PRITCHARD 
1971 





R. C. PAPPAS 
1969 



D. R. PARHAM 
1972 





W. R. C. PHELPS 
1969 



G. L.PHILLIPS III 
1972 





D. H. POORMAN 
1970 



J. P. POORMAN 
1972 




D.J. PROCTOR 
1972 





J. C. PARKIN 
1971 




W. A. PHILLIPS 
1969 




S. H. PRAVDO 
1972 




M. S. PAGE 
1972 




G. B.PATRICK 
1972 




F. PLATA 
1969 




K. M. PRESSMAN 
1971 




F. M. OVSIEW 

1971 I 




i m^ ^TM m¥^ 



p. T. PALADE 
1970 




F. K. PATTON 
1971 




T. A. PLEATMAN 
1969 




L 



J. L. PRICE, JR. 
1972 




M.J. PRYOR 
1969 



W. W. PURVIS 
1971 



J. F. PYFER, JR. 
1969 



J. S. QUISENBERRY 
1971 




J. D. RALPH 
1972 




H. REYNOLDS 
1969 




E.S. RICHTER 
1970 




D. M. ROBERTS 
1970 




D. E. ROHRLICH 
1972 





R. M. RAM 
1970 




B. T. RHODES 
1972 




B. E. RIDLEY 
1971 





8. H. RODES 
1972 




A. M. ROLFE 
1971 





B. R. RASKOB 
1970 




D. L. RICE 
1970 




C. RINGWALT 
1970 




A. C. ROGERS 
1971 




S. M. ROLFE 
1969 



D. M. ROTHSTEIN 
1970 



J. A. ROTTENBERG 
1971 





MaKssa=»xss^s^«Bi;i^ 



D. T. READ 
1972 




B.J. RICHARDSON 
1972 




J. W. ROGERS 
1970 




£t^ 



D. M. ROSEN 
1971 





R. R. REAGAN 
1971 





CM. RICHARDSON 
1971 




H.S. RIVERA 
1971 




K. B. ROGERS 
1970 




D. R. ROSS 
1969 



J. RUBENSTEIN 
1970 




I.S. RICHMOND 
1972 




J.T. RIVERS III 
1969 




S. E. ROGERS 
1971 




B.S. ROTHMAN 
1969 




S. C. RUSSELL 
1971 






p. L. SAMSON 
1972 





R. G. SCHWARTZ 
1971 




^X 



A. B. SHETTEL 
1971 




W. H. SILVERMAN 
1971 




R. A. SANDHAUS 
1971 



R. F. SANTORE 
1971 







J.S.SARGENT 
1969 




J. L. SKLAR 
1970 




M. J. SCHWENK 
1969 




C. A. SHIELDS 
1970 




D. C.SIMMONS 
1972 




E. M. SLEEPER 
1969 





C. J. SCOTT 
1971 




M. K. SHIMODA 
1969 




L. H.SIMONS III 
1970 




D. J.SLOANE 
1972 





R. E. SEROTA 
1969 




S.J.SHAPIRO 
1971 



J^- 




^•*^1 



^T^ ^vM 



S. SILBERLING 
1971 



R. S. SILUK 
1970 






R. T. SATALOFF 
1971 




H.SAUL 


G. M. SAVA 


C.S. SAXTER 


E.W.SCHNEIDER 


M.G.SCHNEIDER 


8. M. SCHOTZ 


1971 


1969 


1969 


1970 


1972 


1970 




M. P.SHAW 
1971 




D.A.SILVERMAN 
1972 




S. G.SIPPLE 
1972 



H. A. SIRE 
1970 



S. D. SKAROFF 
1971 






W. L. SLOCUM 
1970 



J. H.SMALHOUT 
1972 



G. J.SMALLEY 
1971 




A. E.SMITH 
1971 




A. J. SMOLEN 
1970 




S. T. STAVRAKAS 
1971 




R. O. STERN 
1969 






C. R.SMITH 
1972 



E. O.SMITH 
1969 





C. H.SNYDER 
1969 




i 




L. W. SPOEHR 
1969 



T. L. SPRAY 
1970 





C. STEENBERGEN, JR. M.A. STEHNEY 
1972 1971 





D. D. STERNBERGH 
1970 



R. B.STEWART III 
1971 






ilt^ 



M. B.SMITH 
1971 




H.W.SNYDER 
1971 




F. L. STALLINGS 
PB 




M. I.STEPHENS 
1971 





R. G.SMITH 
1972 




M. E.SNYDER 
1970 






yj/KJ 



J. A. STANCO 
1971 




E.STERLING 
1971 



I 




Js^k ^^, 



S. M. STEWART 
PB 



A. W.STOKES, JR. 
1969 






G. M.SMOAK 
1969 




J. E. SORENSON 
1970 




R. L. STAVIS 
1969 




R.STOLL 
1972 




J. W. P. STORCK 
1969 



K. L. STOVER 
1969 



G. R.STROHL III 
1970 



T.W.STU DWELL 
1971 



K. D. SUGARMAN 
1972 



3 

R. F.SUTTON 
1969 




Ai^ 






£^^ 





A. SWAN 


L. F. SWANIM 


J. P. SWEET 


E. J. SZEWCZAK 


C. R. TANNEIMBAUM 


P. A. TASHMAN 


1970 


1972 


1972 


1972 


1971 


1970 




B.TAYLOR 
1971 




R. B.TERRY 
1972 





J. L. TREAT 
1972 









J. H.TAYLOR 
1971 



L.TAYLOR, JR. 
1969 



P. L.TAYLOR 
1969 



P. C.TAYLOR 
1972 



L. P. TEMPLE 
1970 





D. L.THOMAS, JR. 
1971 






W. M. M. THOMAS 
1970 



C. H. THOMPSON 
1970 



D. B. THOMPSON 
1970 







P. W. TOBEY 


W. C. TOMPSETT 


J. G.TOTH 


0. A. TRAINER 


P. J.TRAMDACK 


V. F.TRAPANI 


1970 


1970 


1970 


1972 


1970 


1969 








S. R. ULAN 
1971 



P.J. URQUHARTIII 
1972 



P. C. URSELL 
1972 





M. H. VAN BUSKIRK W.G.WAGNER 

1972 1972 



S. G. WALENS 
1969 



J. N.WALKER 
1970 



kTh 



P.S.WALLACE 
1970 






C. WALTON 
1971 



J. W.WALTON, JR. 
PB 



A. Z. F.WANG 
1972 




F. D.WARREN 
1970 




L. D.WEBBER 
1970 




D.C.WENDELL III 
1972 




C. S. WHITMORE 
1970 





C. G. WILSON 
1970 




J. B.WARREN 
1970 




P. L. WECKSTEIN 
1969 




4Yj 



p. D. WHIDDEN 
1972 




T. N. WHITTIER 
1969 




G. F. WINFIELD 
1989 





d^k 



N. E. WARRES 
1972 




D. S. WEIGHTMAN 
1971 




H.S.WHITE 
1969 




D.S.WILL 
1971 





S.C.WASHBURN 
1969 




R. I. WEISBERG 
1972 




R.S.WHITE 
1969 




A.WILLIAMS 
PB 




P. M. WODLINGER 
1969 




D. N.WOOD 
1969 



A. M.WOODWARD 
1970 



M. E. WORKMAN 
1971 



C.WRIGHT IV 
1971 




W. L. WATSON 
1972 




J. A. WE ISM AN 
1971 




S. L.WHITE 
1971 




R. L.WILLIAMS 
1969 





K. E. WEAVER 
1972 




T. W. WEISMAN 
1969 




W.S.WHITE 
1969 




T. R.WILLIAMS, JR. 
1972 




R.T.WRIGHT 
1972 



J. S. WYLIE 
1971 





M. A. YACKO, JR. 
1972 



D. C. YAGER 
1971 





D. E. YOUNGERMAN M. A. ZABLUDOFF 
1971 1971 






R, D. YAGER 
1972 




R. ZAPANTA 
PB 





T. N. YARMON 
1969 



W. M. YATES 
1969 





J. S. ZECHMAN 
1971 



D. E.ZELLEY 
1972 




S. R.ZUKIN 
1970 



D. C. ZUMETA 
1972 



W. M. ZUMETA 
1969 



STUDENT CLASS LIST 1968-1969 



FRESHMAN CLASS (1972) 

Ackelsberg, Irving 
Albino, Juan A. 
AUen, Matthew H. 
Anderson, T. Robert 
Arner, Roger B. 
Bahn, Peter R. 
Baird, Brian D. 
Ballard, LeRoy 
Baiter, Andrew L. 
Banks, David R. 
Baruffi, Arthur L. 
Bell, Thomas E. 
Belles, Terry A. 
Benke, Eric G. 
Bernard, David H. 
Betz, Edwin H. 
BUane, Robert F. 
Bogen, Russell L. 
Booth, James M. 
Bottalico, Mauro P., Jr. 
Brin, David M. 
Brown, Marc A. 
Brownell, Bruce M. 
Bryan, Robert, Jr. 
Butler, John B., Jr. 
Casey, Donald 
Chapin, Thomas J. 
Chapman, Robert A. 
Clark, Stephen H. 

Clearman, Stephen J. 

Colbert, Andrew F. 

Cotlove, David W. 

Csordas, Gabor J. 

CuUander, Eric 

de Vries, WUlem A. 

Donner, William W. 

Douglas, David S. 

Drury, John W. 

Duncan, Herbert L. 

Easton, Roger L., Jr. 

Emanuel, David L. 

Emmett, Gary A. 

Farshtey, Kenneth D. 

Fein, Johnathan L. 

Finley, David E. 

Fitz, Edward W. 

Fluck, J. Jeffrey 

Freedman, Carl I. 

Fried, Donald R. 

Gann, David E. 

Garber, Mark H. 

Garton, Bruce S. 

Gibbs, Gerald A.,Jr. 

Gjenvick, Timothy C. 

Greenspan, Gary H. 

Griffin, Brian M. 

Griffin, Bruce L. 

Gross, Stephen L. 

Haagen, Paul H. 

Hales, Peter B. 

Hallawell, PhUip C. 

Hallick, Charles E. 
Hamm, Charles L. 
Harper, John L. 
Harris, Thomas W., Jr. 

377 



Haskell, Halford W. 
Heller, Martin E. 
Helme, George W., IV 
Hensley, Paul F. 
Herzberg, Peter J. 
Hirsh, Paul D. 
Hough, Gerald J., Jr. 
Hsia, David C. 
Hunter, Bru':e E. 
Ingram, Robert S. 
Ives, Jonathan W. 
Juch, William A., IV 
Kastner, Scott M. 
Katz, Robert S. 
Kelemen, James A. 
Kerr, Christopher J. 
Kleiman, Mark R. 
Kozey, Stephen G. 
Krause, James C. 
Krause, Paul L. 
Lamb, Bruce E. 
Lawrence, Niel S. 
Lawson, Thomas E. 
Lee, Robert F. 
Lerche, Charles O., Ill 
Levin, William A. 
Lewris, Guy E. 
Lindsay, S. Craig 
Loughrey, William P. 
Love, Mark W. 
Ludwig, Kenneth D. 
Lycett, James A. 
Lyon, Geoffrey P. 
MacDonald S. Alexander 
Magun, Arthur M. 
Mann, W. Berkeley, Jr. 
Manning, Mark C. 
Marino, Andrew L. 
Masland, Thomas W. 
Mason, John T. 
McHarg, Alistair C. 
McKee, Robert S. 
McMurtrey, Kevin S. 
Meltzer, Steven M. 
Metzger, Charles G. 
Midgett, Roger S. 
Mindus, Paul D. 
Morrison, Peter H. 
Morrow, Robert C. 
Nicholson, David E. 
Nordine, Kenneth E., Jr. 
Oberholtzer, Scott K. 
0'Donnell,JohnR. 
O'Hara, Frank K. 
Olson, Peter M. 
Pabarue, James A. A., Jr. 
Pace, Timothy 
Page, Michael S. 
Parham, David R. 
Patrick, Gregory B. 
Phillips, G. Lawrence, III 
Poorman, John P. 
Pravdo, Steven H. 
Price, John L., Jr. 
Proctor, David J. 
Ralph, Jonathan D. 



Read, David T. 
Rhodes, Barry T. 
Richardson, Brant J. 
Richmond, Ian S. 
Rodes, Stuart H. 
Rohrlich, David E. 
Samson, Peter L. 
Schneider, Marcus G. 
Silverman, David A. 
Simmons, David C. 
Sipple, Scott G. 
Sloane, David J. 
Smalhout, James H. 
Smith, Curtis R. 
Smith, Robert G. 
Steenbergen, Charles, Jr. 
Stoll,J. Robert 
Sugarman, Kenneth D. 
Swann, Lawrence F. 
Sweet, John D. 
Szewczak, Edward J. 
Taylor, PhUip C. 
Terry, Richard B. 
Thomas, David B. 
Trainer, Owen A. 
Treat, John L. 
Urquhart, Paul J., Ill 
Ursell, PhUip C. 
Van Buskirk, Michael H. 
Wagner, William G. 
Wang, Andrew Z.F. 
Warres, Neil E. 
Watson, William L. 
Weaver, Karl E. 
Weisberg, Robert I. 
Wendell, Douglas C, III 
Whidden, Paul D. 
Williams, Theodore R., Jr. 
Wint, Ian K. 
Wolpe, Allan 
Wright, R. Thompson 
Yacko, Michael A., Jr. 
Yager, Robert D. 
ZeUey, David E. 
Zumeta, David C. 



SOPHOMORE CLASS (1971) 



Alter, Dinsmore J. 
Andrews, William W. 
Arinsberg, David E. 
Bachman, R. Rugeley 
Balint, Peter J. 
Barry, Stephen W. 
Battels, Andrew H. 
Barton, Scott L. 
Barton, Stephen E. 
BatzeU, Stephen W. 
Beckwith, Eric G. 
Berg, Douglas A. 
Berry, Donald F. 
Blistein, Adam D. 
Bohrer, Robert A. 
Bonaduce. EmU V. 



Brassfield, David C. 
Brenner, Douglas R. 
Brown, R. Christopher 
Bryson, Timothy S. 
Burke, AUan M. 
Carter, David W. 
Chester, Edwin P. 
Chewning, John A. 
Clough, Thomas L. 
Cole, Richard M. 
Collar, John A. 
Craig, Barton J. 
Crawford, Richard B. 
Davidson, John L. 
Decker, Jack W. 
Deklewa, James R. 
Delano, Jonathan W. 
Dentpn, Donald M. 
Diamond, Stuart S. 
Director, Roger L. 
Edelston, A. Kenneth 
Eisdorfer, Stephen M. 
Erickson, Timothy L. 
Espo, David M. 
Evans, Donald W. 
Fales, E. Noel, II 
Feroe, Barton K. 
Ferree, G. Donald, Jr. 
Finkel, Howard B. 
Fly, Maurice L. 
Foley, Ronald C. 
Forman, Stephen L. 
Froehlke, Bruce R. 
Gilchrist, William R. 
Gill, John T. 
Gilmer, Patrick M. 
Goderez, Bruce I. 
Goldberger, Peter D. 
Goldman, Michael H. 
Goodman, Roy S. 
Gowen, Thomas L., Jr. 
Greenfield, Richard R. 
Grimmelmann, Erik K. 
Hall, Walter R. 
Hart, Philip C. 
Harvey, William R. 
Hastings, Brian W. 
Hayden, John D., Jr. 
Heaton, Charles J., Jr. 
Hepner, David A. 
Herrmann, PaiJ J. 
Hobson, William R. 
Hodges, Peter B. 
Hoenemeyer, Frank J. 
Hoopes, Thomas M. 
Home, Carl S. 
Huibregtse, Mark E. 
Hurd, Hollis T. 
Inver, Marc R. 
Jacobson, Harlan M. 
Jenkins, Daniel W. 
Johnson, Douglas H. 
Johnston, Robert A. 
Jones, Steven S. 
Kamarck, Martin A. 
Kimmich, Robert A., Jr. 



STUDENT CLASS LIST 1968-1969 



Koeppe, Roger E., II 
Kovaric, Thomas R. 
Kromer, John S. 
Kunz, Timothy A. 
Lanson, Gerald F. 
Laquer, Christopher M. 
Lewis, John A. 
Louie, Samuel 
Lovenworth, Stanton J. 
Lowry, Andrew B. 
MacClaren, Marc S. 
MacLean, Duncan S. 
Mahon, Morgan B. 
Maier, John R. 
Marge, Wayne S. 
Mason, Joseph A. 
McLemore, Michael K. 
Melvin, Paul M. 
Merkler, Richard G. 
Miller, Richard A. 
Miller, Steven E. 
Millhofer, Lawrence G. 
Mong, Robert W. 
Morrow, Paul L. 
Myers, Jeffrey D. 
Newcomb, Steven R. 
Norris, Ronald B. 
Orefice, Stephen S. 
Ovsiew, Fred M. 
Owens, J. Craig 
Parkin, John C. 
Patton, Frederick K. 
Perry, Harvey C. 
Pober, Jordan S. 
Pressman, Kurt M. 
Pritchard, Arnold J. 
Purvis, William W. 
Quisenberry, J. Stokes 
Reagan, Robert R. 
Richardson, Curtis M. 
Ridley, Bruce E. 
Ritchey, Patrick W. 
Rivera, Henry S. 
Rogers, Alan C. 
Rogers, Samuel E. 
Rolfe, Arthur M. 
Rosen, David M. 
Rottenberg, John A. M. 
Rubenstein, Jonathan L. 
Russell, Stephen C. 
Sandhaus, Robert A. 
Santore, Richard F. 
Sataloff, Robert T. 
Saul, Harry 
Schwartz, Robert G. 
Scott, Christopher J. 
Shapiro, Stephen J. 
Shaw, Mark P. 
Shettel, A. Bruce 
Silberling, Stephen P. 
Silverman, William H. 
Skaroff, Steven D. 
Smalley, Gregory J. 
Smith, Anthony E. 
Smith, Matthew B. 
Snyder, Hal W. 
Stance, John A. 
377 



Stavrakas, Spyros T. 
Stehney, Michael A. 
Stephens, Mitchell I. 
Sterling, Eric E. 
Stewart, Robert B., Ill 
Studwell, Thomas W. 
Tannenbaum, Carl R. 
Taylor, Bruce T. 
Taylor, James H. 
Thomas, David L., Jr. 
Ulan, Stephen P. 
Walton, Christopher M. 
Weightman, Donald S. 
Weisman, James A. 
White, Stephen L. 
Will, Donald S. 
Workman, Mark E. 
Wright, Curtis, IV 
Wylie, Johns. 
Yager, David C. 
Youngerman, David E. 
Zabludoff, Marc A. 
Zechman, John S. 



JUNIOR CLASS (1970) 

Aird, R. Bruce 
Allen, Jeffrey B. 
AUen, John L. 
Averick, Jeffrey 
Bakke, John N. 
Barbis, John M. 
Berliss, Herman 
Birdzell, Luther E., Ill 
Bomba, Joseph V. 
Boyer, David H. 
Briselli, Michael F. 
Brown, Sayers 
Callahan, Stephen J. 
Chandler, Robert J. 
Cole, Peter 
Coleman, Peter K. 
Colvin, Christopher S. 
Conroy, France H. 
Cross, David W. 
Czaminsld, Johnny J. 
Das, Aruneshwar 
Davis, Edwin H. 
Davis, Felmon J. 
Dematatis, Christopher C. 
Denny. Thomas A. 
Dickinson, Joseph A. 
Dunne, Christopher E. 
Dye, John R. 
Elkinton, Joseph S. 
Emmons, James R. 
Erb, Steven T. 
Ewell, Peter T. 
Finklestein, Seth P. 
Fishbein, Gerald P. 
Fite, Richard W. 
French, Robert A. 
Fry, Douglas E. 
Fujii, Tour 
Gefter, Warren B. 



Gorski, Peter A. 
Green, Donald J. 
Greenfield, Mark J. 
Hamilton, David L. 
Handford, Peter S. 
Harrison, Marc J. 
Hedrick, Charles L. 
Hicks, Kenneth A. 
Homer, Wesley R. 
Humphries, Michael L. 
Hurley, Geoffrey K. 
Hutchins, William A. 
lacobucci, Bruce C. 
Ihrie, Robert, Jr. 
Ingram, William C. 
Inslee, J. William 
Irving, Andrew M. 
Jaffee, Harris A. 
Jarvis, Richard K. 
Jeranek, Gerald L. 
Jones, Stephen M. 
Kauffman, Peter C. 
Kaufman, Stephen J. 
Kluge, John 
Lewis, John E., Jr. 
Lewis, Richard H. 
Lincoln, Bruce K. 
Linn, Robert W. 
Lister, Eric D. 
Louie, Arthur C. 
Lu, Christopher Y. 
Mairinson, Steven A. 
Massie, Herbert P. 
McCain, Thayer A. 
Melby, Eric D.K. 
Miles, William O, II 
Miller, Michael A. 
MiUer, Michael R. 
Morgan, Alan C. 
Murphy, Stanley J. 
Neal,JohnW. 
Newburger, Peter E. 
Newman, George C. 
Nicholson, Jeremy D. 
Nickel, Thomas B. 
Novak, David J. 
O'Leary, Maurice J. 
Oran, David R. 
Ottenberg, John C. 
Palade, Philip T. 
Pancoast, Taylor A. 
Poorman, Dean H. 
Ram, Richard M. 
Raskob, B. Russell 
Reri, Kalman 
Rice, Daniel L. 
Richter. Eric S. 
Ringwalt, Christopher L. 
Roberts, David M. 
Rogers, John W. 
Rogers, Kurt B. 
Rothstein, David M. 
Russek, Edward 
Schneider, Edgar W.. Jr. 
Schotz, Bennett M. 
Shields, Charles A., Jr. 
Siluk, Richard S. 



Simons, Laird H., Ill 
Sire, Hendrik A. 
Sklar, Jeffrey L. 
Slocum, William L. 
Smolen, Arnold J. 
Snyder, Michael E. 
Sorensen, Jorge E. 
Speller, Jeffrey L. 
Spray, Thomas L. 
Sternbergh, D. Dexter 
Strohl, G. Ralph, III 
Swan, Alexis 
Tashman, Peter A. 
Temple, L. Peter 
Thomas, W. M. Merrick 
Thompson, Charles H. 
Thompson, Donald B. 
Tobey, Peter W. 
Tompsett, William C. 
Toth. Jerry G. 
Tramdack, Philip J. 
Walker, Joseph N. 
Wallace, P. Scott 
Warren, Frederick D. 
Warren, Jonathan B. 
Webber, Leland D. 
Whitmore, Charles S. 
Wilson, C. Geoffrey 
Wolfe, R. Bradley 
Woodward, Albert M. 
Zukin, Stephen R. 



JUNIOR YEAR ABROAD 

Fuller, Martin T. 
Phillips, Steven W. 
Gordon, Daniel R. 
Sites, James P. 



SENIOR CLASS (1969) 

Agarwal, Rajesh K. 
Anderson, Renner S. 
Armstrong, Robert B. 
Bailey, Steven O. 
Baranano, Eduardo C. 
Barnett, Michael S. 
Barrett, Jay E. 
Barry, David M. 
Beale, Robert B. 
Bickley, William P. 
Bower, James R. 
Braucher, William K. 
Chaney, Edmund F. 
Cook, Joel D. 
Cropper, Stephen W. 
Downs, N. Thompson 
Dunham, Andrew B. 
Edgar, Kenneth C Jr. 
Elliott, David F. 
Engel, Robert J. 
Follet, John D. 
Forehand, V. Thomas, Jr. 
Forman, William R. 



STUDENT CLASS LIST 1968-1969 



Foster, Daniel W. 
Foster, David H. 
Frankel, Donald S., Jr. 
Freund, Ronald D. 
Frey, Bertram C. 
Fry, John B. 
Garretson, Peter P. 
Garrett, Raymond E. 
Geise, Jack P., Jr. 
Gerber, Stephen R. 
Gleeson, John R., Ill 
Godbey,John K.,Jr. 
Golding, Timothy B. 
Gregg, John S. 
Gresov, Winston G. 
Hammel, Robert H. 
Harris, Henry J.H. 
Hawley, Robert C, Jr. 
Helme, Edward A. 
Henderson, John L. 
Hipp, Spencer H. 
Hook, Andrew T. 
Hoster, Jay B. 
Jackson, Gregg W. 
Jackson, J. Lance F. 
Jarocki, Stanley A. 
Johnstone, Peter T. 
Kamm, Keith A. 
Katzman, Abner J. 
Keenan, S. Terrence 
Kimball, Robert H. 
Kleppinger, James 
Krieger, Terry M. 
Kritzer, Herbert M. 
Langley, Keith E. 
Larson, Nels L. 
Laurence, John A. 



Lazaroff, David W. 
Lehman, John F. 
Lightbody, Richard A. 
Lindsey, Mack C. 
Long, Franklin A., II 
Lowe, Frederick V., Jr. 
Lukeric, VeHmir 
Marshall, David S., Ill 
Mason, H. Denning 
McConnell, Geoffrey R. 
Meier, Thomas R. 
Newkirk, Arthur D. 
Olver, Richard B. 
Orlando, L.H. Raffaello 
Pappas, Richard C. 
Phelps, William R.C. 
Phillips, William A. 
Plata, Fernando T. 
Pleatman, Thomas A. 
Pry or, Miguel J. 
Pyfer,John F., Jr. 
Reynolds, Hadley 
Rivers, Joseph T., Ill 
Rolfe, Stephen M. 
Ross, Douglas R. 
Roth man, Barry S. 
Rub, Christopher L. 
Santoro, Franklin A. 
Sargent, John S. 
Sava, Gregory M. 
Saxer, Craig S. 
Schwenk, Marshall J. 
Serota, Richard E. 
Shimoda, Mark K. 
Sleeper, Edward M. 
Smith, Eric O. 
Smoak, Glenn M. 



Sneden, Christopher A. 
Snyder, Christopher H., Jr. 
Spoehr, Luther W. 
Stavis, Robert L. 
Stern, Dennis L. 
Stern, Robert O. 
Stokes, Allen W., Jr. 
Storck, JohnW.P. 
Stover, Kenneth L. 
Sutton, Robert F., Jr. 
Taylor, Lawrence, Jr. 
Taylor, Peter L. 
Trapani, Vincent F. 
Walens, StarJey G. 
Washburn, Stephen C. 
Weckstein, Paul L. 
Weisman, Thomas W. 
White, Henry S. 
White, Robert S. 
White, W. Stanley 
Whittier, Thomas N. 
WiUiams, Rogelio L. 
Winfield, George F. 
Wodlinger, Paul M. 
Wood, Daniel N. 
Yarmon, Thomas N. 
Yates, William M. 
Yen, Andrew 
Zumeta, William M. 



FIRST SEMESTER ABROAD 

Fried, Robert S. 
Haselton, Frederick R., Ill 
Lane, Christopher L. 



SENIOR YEAR ABROAD 
Wangh, Mitchell W. 



POST-BACCALAUREATE 
FELLOWS 

Asberry, Alphonso 
Aycox, Bruce G, 
Boulware, R. James 
Evans, Nathaniel R., II 
Hayes, John M. 
Hill, Richard E. 
Jackson, Thomas A. 
McCurtis, Henry L. 
Mullins, Joseph 
Stallings, Fred L. 
Stewart, Steve M. 
Walton, Jonathan W., Jr. 
Williams, Adolphus 
Zapanta, Richard 



SPECIAL STUDENTS 

Ferguson, Sallye 
Gangadean, Merrily 
Harada, Katsuzo 
Lazaroff, Cheryl S. 
Long, H. Linda 
Mandell, Deborah L. 
Miehle, Bjorg 
Ransom, Jerilyn B. 
Spiegler, Ethel 
Sunstein, Willard 



THE 

HAVERFORD COLLEGE 

STUDENTS' GUIDE 



Published by The Students' Association and The Office of 
the Dean of Students. 

Editorial Staff: Luther Spoehr, Co-Editor; Robert 
Armstrong, Co-Editor; and Joel Cook, President of the 
Students' Association. 

Haverford, Pennsylvania 
1968-1969 

"Some men see things 

as they are and say why. 

I dream, things that never 

were and say why not. " 

-Robert F. Kennedy 



Table of Contents 

I. Student Government and Organizations 
II. The Honor System 

III. Campus Guidelines 

IV. Athletics 

V. Guide to the Haverford Library 
VI. Residence Halls and Food Services 
VII. Student Services 
VIII. Social Life and Other Necessities 
IX. Index 



L Student Government 
and Organizations 



"Democracy is a very 

bad form of government, but, I beg 

you never to forget, all 

the others are so much worse." 

-Sir Winston Churchill 



socmv 



-ACTION 






^;DRnFT WffMSrta- 




THE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION 

The idea of student self-government traditionally has been 
basic to the underlying concepts and the ultimate goals of a 
Haverford education. Consequently, the College has granted 
the right of self-government to the Students' Association, to 
which all students belong. In a decade where the concept of 
student power is being formulated on many campuses, the 
ideas of real student self-government and involvement in the 
administration of the College have long been an actuality at 
Haverford, an actuality preserved by the ideal and practice of 
student responsibility in the College community. 

STUDENTS' COUNCIL 

The Students' Council is the executive body of the 
Students' Association, and it is empowered by the Association 
to execute regulations legislated by the Association, supervise 
all extracurricular activites other than athletics, and generally 
conduct the affairs of the student body. 

At the present time, there are sixteen members of the 
Students' Council. Officers are elected by the student body, 
and class representatives are elected by each class. The 
1968-69 members are: 

President Joel Cook, '69 

Secretary Herbert Massie, '70 

Treasurer Thomas Spray, '70 

Henry Harris, '69 Jonathan Delano, '71 

Christopher Lane, '69 Michael McLemore, '71 

Paul Weckstein, '69 Jonathan Rubinstein, '71 

Robert Linn, '70 David Thomas, '71 

John Ottenberg, '70 

The first item on Council's order of business this school 
year will be the presentation of a proposal for a new 
constitution to the Students' Association. The new 
constitution would estabUsh a structure of student government 
based upon hall representation in place of the present Council 
structure. Copies of the present and proposed constitutions are 
included in this Handbook. 

STUDENTS' COUNCIL COMMITTEES 

To assist in carrying out the functions of student 
government. Students' Council each year appoints committees. 
In most cases, committee appointments are made by Council 
from sign-up lists posted on the Founders bulletin board. This 
allows any interested student to take an active part in some 
aspect of student government. The primary committees for 
1968-69 are as follows: 

Big Brother Committee. This committee plays a major 
role in freshman orientation. Freshmen receive many of their 
first impressions of the College from the correspondence and 
meetings with their Big Brothers. The major tasks of the 
committee are enlisting upperclassmen to be Big Brothers, 
pairing each incoming freshman with an upperclassman, and 
coordinating the letter-writing procedure. Kenneth Edgar, '69. 
Luther Spoehr, '69, and Jonathan Delano, '71, Co-Chairmen. 

Bryn Mawr-Haverford Committee on Bi-CoUege 
Cooperation. In view of the increasing number of programs 
and activities common to both Haverford and Bryn Mawr 
Colleges, this committee was established last semester to serve 
as the central body for discussion of mutual concerns. The 
method utilized by this committee to foster serious 
consideration of various issues is to invite the relevant groups 
from each school to meet together to discuss the problem at 



hand. Some of the issues dealt with last semester included the 
meal exchange, coordination of social activities, the school 
calendar, and the policy of each school regarding courses taken 
at the other institution. This committee will have a large 
influence in directing the future course of relations between 
Haverford and Bryn Mawr. Paul Weckstein, '69, Chairman. 

Colloquia Committee. This committee is concerned with 
defining more fully the aims and goals of Haverford College. 
Its main task this year will be to organize and direct the sequel 
to last year's Colloquia. One student summarized his feelings 
about that Colloquia in this way: "We . . . had to come 
together and have spent a day talking and thinking together in 
order that we could better understand our common concern. 
There were disagreements and misunderstandings but, 
nonetheless, there was a unifying interest and spirit. It was this 
spirit, I feel, that was so valuable." 

Course Evaluation Committee. At the end of each 
semester, students are asked by this committee to fill out a 
Course Evaluation Questionnaire for each of their courses. The 
results of these questionnaires are compiled and published in 
booklet form for use by students in future course selection. 
The booklets are also utilized by faculty and administration 
when possible curriculum changes are being considered. Harris 
Jaffee, '70, Chairman. 

Customs Committee. One of the unique aspects of 
Haverford is that freshman orientation (Customs Week) is 
entirely planned and carried out by students. The Customs 
Committee is responsible for Customs Week, a program to 
acquaint freshmen, transfer students, and Post-Baccalaureate 
students with the programs and traditions of Haverford, 
notably in the areas of academics and the Honor System. This 
week also affords ample opportunities for these students to 
become acquainted with the upperclassmen on the committee, 
with the other new students, and with some nearby women's 
schools, particularly Bryn Mawr. Edmund Chancy, '69, John 
Laurence, '69, and Dennis Stern, '69, Co-Chairmen. 

Expansion Committee. Since the inception of the 
expansion program. Council has endeavored to maintain the 
administration's awareness of the student body's needs and 
opinions. Students serve on board subcommittees, on faculty 
committees, and on the Students' Council Expansion 
Committee. This last group attempts to exert student 
influence on all phases of the expansion program, including 
physical and educational development. Edward Helme, '69, 
Chairman. 

Final Examinations Committee. Haverford's system of 
self-scheduled final examinations is now being imitated by sev- 
eral other schools. This system, initiated by the students in 
1962, is designed to reduce the pressures of the final exam 
period. The committee acquaints freshmen and other new stu- 
dents with the operation and implications of the examination 
system and administers final examinations. Bennett Schotz, 
'70, Chairman. 

Food Committee. This committee makes suggestions for 
the improvement of food and food service, and is the medium 
through which student opinions about the elegant decor and 
sumptuous cuisine of the Haverford Dining Room are 
expressed. Herman Berliss, '70, Chairman. 

Handbook Committee. This is a small group of students 



who work with the Dean of Students in the compilation of 
this illustrious publication. The work required takes place 
almost entirely during the summer. Robert Armstrong, '69, 
and Luther Spoehr, '69, Co-Editors. 

Honor System Committee. The purpose of this committee 
is to help Council with its responsibilities regarding the most 
important factor of campus life, the Honor System. Of special 
interest to this committee is the preparation of written 
information which is requested by other schools. It is also 
involved in maintaining student awareness of the system. If 
student government is reorganized early in the fall, the work 
of this committee will be taken over by the Honor System 
Council, a group similar in composition to the present 
Students' Council, but whose sole responsibility will be 
matters pertaining to the Honor System and the Code of 
Student Responsibility. Chairman of the present committee: 
Michael McLemore, '71. 

Reorganization Committee. The task of this committee, 
organized last semester, is to formulate a proposal for a new 
constitution of the Students' Association and to present it to 
the student body for provisional acceptance or rejection early 
in the fall semester. The proposed constitution, a copy of 
which appears in this handbook, changes the basis of student 
government from class representation to hall representation, 
provides for an Honor System Council, and establishes an 
Executive Committee. Hall representation means that each 
group of students living on the same hall would select its own 
representative, whose main responsibility would be to 
communicate to his hallmates what Students' Council is doing 
and to bring to the Council the opinions of his hallmates. The 
Honor System Council is a group similar in composition to the 
present Students' Council, but its responsibility is limited to 
matters relating to the Honor System and the Code of Student 
Responsibility. The Executive Committee - President, two 
Vice-Presidents, Secretary, and Treasurer — carries the bulk of 
the responsibility for implementing the decisions made by 
Students' Council. 

Members of this committee: Joel Cook, '69, Chairman; 
Henry Harris, '69; Christopher Lane, '69; Hadley Reynolds, 
'69; Robert Linn, '70; Thomas Spray, '70; Jonathan Delano, 
'71 ; Robert Stewart, '71 ; David Thomas, '71 . 

Service Fund Committee. This committee organizes the 
annual campus drive to raise money for charity. Funds from 
the 1968 drive were allocated to the Serendipity Day Camp 
and to two organizations dealing with aid to American Negroes 
and American Indians. A chairman will be appointed early in 
the school year by the Students' Council. 

Social Committee Because of the nature and amount of 
work involved, the organization of this committee is complex. 
All Class Officers serve on this committee. Any student 
interested in helping to plan or coordinate social events is 
welcome to work as a committee member. 

All social activities are coordinated by this group. These 
would include the Art Series, Class Night, various cultural 
activities on and off campus, the film series, mixers, and plans 
for Festive Weekends. The committee will work closely with 
its counterpart at Bryn Mawr College. Christopher Dunne, '70, 
and Robert Linn, '70, Co-Chairmen. 

Art Series Committee. This committee, which includes 
students and faculty members, selects the attractions for 
the Annual Art Series. Its selections are intended to appeal 



to a wide range of interests; last year's presentations 
included John Hammond, the Rive Gauche, and the Charles 
Lloyd Jazz Quartet. The committee also shares 
responsibility for publicity, ticket sales, and other concert 
arrangements. The chairman is a member of the Social 
Committee. 

Class Night Committee. This committee organizes and 
conducts the annual Class Night Program. Each class writes 
and produces a short play, usually about campus life and its 
"humor." Last year the Class of 1969 won the award for 
the outstanding play. In the past, the faculty and interested 
Bryn Mawr students have attempted to retaliate in kind. All 
proceeds go to scholarships. The chairman of this 
committee is a member of the Social Committee. 

Cultural Committee. This committee works in 
conjunction with the Bryn Mawr College Arts Council to 
arrange cultural activities both on and off the campus. The 
committee also publishes "Cultural Broadsides," a monthly 
leaflet which catalogues upcoming cultural events in the 
Philadelphia and New York areas, and arranges special low 
student prices for local attractions. The chairman of the 
committee is also a member of the Social Committee. 
Anyone interested in working with this group should 
contact the chairman of the Social Committee. 



STUDENTS ON FACULTY COMMITTEES 

The students at Haverford are fortunate in being 
represented on all faculty committees. Because of the special 
nature of such positions, appointments are made by the 
Students' Council, subject to the approval by the committee 
itself. 

Academic Flexibility Committee. The Academic 
Flexibility Committee consists of Faculty members and the 
Associate Dean of the College, who serves as Executive 
Secretary. 

The Associate Dean is responsible for reviewing all student 
records, and for bringing to the attention of the committee 
any student whom he believes might profit by special treat- 
ment, as well as any who request such treatment. 

The committee is responsible for bringing to the attention 
of appropriate students the possibilities for flexibility which 
exist for them , and from which they might profit. 

The committee is empowered to make exceptions to any 
of the academic regulations, and is responsible for acting on all 
reqeuests from students for such exceptions. Before granting 
an exception, the committee must secure approval from the 
student's Major Supervisor or, if the student is an 
underclassman, from his Advisor and, if his prospective major 
is known, from the Chairman of that department. 

The Associate Dean, in consultation with the rest of the 
committee, is responsible for evaluating the results of 
experiments in flexibility, and for communicating with other 
institutions about such results. 

Students should note that this committee deals largely 
with exceptions arising from academic excellence; academic 
troubles are the responsibility of the Academic Standing 
Committee. 

William Davidon, Chairman; John Cary, Preston Rowe, 
and David Potter, Faculty and Administration Members; 
Steven Erb, '70, and Peter Ewell, '70, Student Representatives. 

Academic Standing Committee. The Academic Standing 
Committee is responsible for reviewing periodically the records 
of all students whose work is unsatisfactory. The committee 



meets regularly when deficiencies are reported and semester 
grades are given. It has the authority to drop students from the 
College, to prescribe certain conditions for continuing, or to 
specify additional work. 

Should a student's record warrant his being dropped from 
the College or required to take a leave of absence, the decision 
of the committee will be postponed to a second meeting which 
will be held within five days of the first, and the student and 
his adviser will be notified that such action is possible. The 
student will be invited to appear before the committee if he 
wishes to do so, and his adviser, or another faculty member 
who knows him well, may be invited as well. If the student 
does not appear, the committee will make a decision in his 
absence and inform him of it in writing. Decisions of the 
committee may be appealed to the President of the College. 

Colin MacKay, Chairman; Robert Butman, William 
Davidon, Paul Hare, and David Potter, Faculty and 
Administration Members; Stephen Washburn, '69, and Scott 
Wallace, '70, Student Representatives. 

Distinguished Visitors and Library Committee. The 

Distinguished Visitors and Library Committee has 
responsibility for the use of funds available under three gifts to 
the College. They enable the College to bring to the campus 
outstanding visitors who can add substantially to the life of 
the college community. The terms of the funds cover 
"distinguished scientists or statemen," "distinguished scholars 
in the humanities," and "distinguished persons in the field of 
the humanities and social sciences." 

Every campus invites scholars, artists, celebrities, and 
other public figures, generally for a single speech or concert; 
Haverford tries to obtain deeper and more meaningful contact. 
Visits of two or three days, two weeks, or a whole semester are 
scheduled. Systematic efforts are made to arrange a wide 
variety of settings in which students and faculty in small 
groups can benefit from a visitor's presence. Occasionally 
several visitors are brought simultaneously for searching review 
of an issue. 

Proposals for visitors can come from anywhere in the 
community. The committee is especially interested in 
imaginative ideas for bringing together several fields, achieving 
new levels of understanding, or gaining deeper insight into 
human excellence. From year to year, the success of the 
program depends on initiative from students and faculty in 
making use of its potential. 

Daniel Gill is, Chairman; David Foster, '69, Yale 
Rosenthal, '70, and Duncan McLean, '71, Student 
Representatives. 

Collection Committee. The Collection Committee is 
responsible for selecting and presenting topics and visitors for 
weekly Tuesday morning Collections. The programs are 
intended to provide a forum in which the entire campus 
community may pursue critical personal and moral issues 
relevant to the terms in which we live; issues which may not 
generally fit into classroom work. During this coming year 
Collections will be presented that explore issues related to 
urban affairs, the Blacks in America, national politics, and 
higher education. 

John R. Coleman, Chairman; Wesley R. Horner, '70, Jack 
P. Geise, '69, Student Representatives. 



Educational Policy and Admissions. The Educational 
Policy and Admissions Committee oversees (1) educational 
policy in general, and (2) the curriculum in particular. It is 



responsible for keeping abreast of new ideas in higher 
education and for initiating proposals to the faculty based on 
such ideas. In overseeing the curriculum, the committee 
concerns itself with such matters as the revision of programs 
proposed by individual departments; major changes in courses; 
the initiation of new courses, and the dropping of old ones; 
course requirements, such as freshman English, language, and 
limited electives; and interrelationships among divisions, areas, 
departments, and courses. A full-scale curricular review is 
currently on the committee's agenda. Richard Bernstein, 
Chairman; Henry Harris, '69, and Bennett Schotz, '70, Student 
Representatives. 

Honors and Fellowships. Thomas D'Andrea, Chairman; 
Allen Cohen, '69, Student Representative. 

Non-Academic Program. Theodore Hetzel, Chairman; 
Robert Stern, '69, and William Inslee, '70, Student 
Representatives. 

CAMPUS ORGANIZATIONS 

Campus organizations are recognized and supported by 
the Students' Council. Most of the fmancial support for these 
organizations is appropriated by the Students' Council from a 
portion of the unit fee designated for use by the Students' 
Association. 

All student organizations, in order to be offlcially 
recognized by the College, and to be eligible for unit fee 
appropriations, must be recognized by Students' Council. New 
organizations must perform a function for the College not 
already being carried out, cannot be honorary or social in 
nature, and cannot be exclusive in membership. Students 
wishing to establish new organizations are invited to discuss 
their ideas with the Students' Council for aid in meeting the 
general criteria for recognition. 

A.I.E.S.E.C. "What is AIESEC? This is a question we must 
all ask ourselves in our four years here at Haverford College." 
The Haverford-Bryn Mawr local committee of AIESEC 
(Association Internationale des Etudiants en Sciences 
Economiques et Commercials) provides students writh an 
opportunity for practical business training through a summer 
exchange program with businesses in foreign countries. 
Kenneth Edgar, '69, President. 

Brass Ensemble. The Brass Ensemble concentrates on 
music for brass from the Baroque and contemporary eras. It 
sometimes .serves as accompanist for choral groups and 
performs on special occasions as well as during regular 
Orchestra concerts. 

Chess Club. The Chess Club resembles a varsity team, in 
that matches are regularly scheduled with nearby schools. 
Thei is also a tournament scheduled among the members. All 
intertsted students should contact John Gregg, '69, or David 
Novak '70. 

College Orchestral Activities. Orchestra and smaller 
instrumental ensembles are sponsored by the Music 
Department under the direction of Dr. William Reese, and are 
featured for specific concerts during the year. Opportunity is 
provided for students with musical ability to participate in 
these activities and concerts. 

Drama Club. In cooperation with the Bryn Mawr College 



Theatre, the Drama Club normally presents three major 
productions annually, alternating between Bryn Mawr and 
Haverford stages. In addition, Drama Club presents several 
student-directed and some student-written plays, under the 
auspices of Little Theatre. Unforeseen difficulties last year lim- 
ited productions to two; TAMING OF THE SHREW, and 
MEDEA. In addition the Little Theatre presented THE 
LADY'S NOT FOR BURNING and A DELICATE BALANCE. 
Major productions are under the direction of resident director, 
Robert Butman. David F. Elliott, '69, President. 

Founders Club. The Founders Club was established in 
1914 as a Haverford organization of students, alumni, and 
faculty. Election to its membership is recognition of a sound 
academic record combined with noteworthy participation in 
extracurricular activities. Undergraduate elections are usually 
limited to the junior and senior classes. 

Glee Club. This year, for the first time, the Haverford 
College Glee Qub and the Bryn Mawr College Chorus will be 
combined as a mixed chorus and will present four concerts at 
home and on other campuses. The conductors are Dr. WilUam 
Reese and Professor Robert Goodale. The music scheduled for 
this season includes Bach's Magnificat, the Stravinsky Mass, 
and Handel's Israel in Egypt. Last year, the Glee Oub gave 
three performances of Bach's St. Matthew Passion. Rehearsals 
are scheduled twice weekly, and merobersh^} is open to all 
interested students. Stephen Cropper, '69, President. 

The Haverford News. The student news publication of the 
College. The Haverford News, is distributed on Fridays 
throughout the college year except during examination 
periods. Positions on the News are open to any student, with 
or witho.ut previous experience, who is interested in news, 
feature, or sports writing, as well as circulation and business. 
France Conroy, '70, Editor-in-Chief. 

Haverford College Varsity Marching Society and Auxiliary 
Fife, Drum, and Kazoo Corps. The raison d'etre for this 
long-titled and short-disciplined seasonal assemblage is to 
increase the spirit of the student body, as well as to provide 
students with an opportunity to use whatever musical talents 
they may have and to "flame" a little bit on certain traditional 
occasions. To accomplish all of these noble purposes, it 
appears at occasional home football games, all Swarthmore 
games, and a few other select functions. A leader will emerge 
early in the fall, and appeals for members will soon follow. 

Little Theatre. Under the sponsorship of the Bryn Mawr 
College Theatre, the Little Theatre provides facilities and 
sponsorhsip for independent experimental theatre work. 
During the year, several student-directed plays are presented in 
the Skinner Workshop, Bryn Mawr. Last year's productions 
were Synge's Riders to the Sea, Giraudoux's The Apollo of 
Bellac, and Albee's A Delicate Balance. This year's first 
production has been tentatively scheduled for early October. 
Students interested in directing should contact Craig Owens, 
'71. 



Modem Dance Club. This organization gives its members 
the opportunity to study and perform modern dance. Its 
activities are held in conjunction with the Bryn Mawr College 
Modern Dance Club. Last year, the Club presented a Christmas 
Concert and a Spring Concert, and performed at a dance 
festival at Yale University. All interested persons, regardless of 



previous experience, should contact Herbert Kritzer, '69, or 
Christopher Colvin, '70. 

O.I.M.G. The purpose of O.I.M.G. (Organization of 
Independent Musical Groups) is to sponsor independent 
student musical enterprises and to increase the importance of 
the role of music on the campus. Last year, it sponsored the 
Haverford-Bryn Mawr Chamber Orchestra, a barbershop 
quartet, a string quartet, and several other chamber music 
groups. Plans for this year include competitions in both 
performance and composition, as well as expansion into other 
aspects of the musical life of the campus. Stanley Walens, '69, 
Director. 

Record. The Record is the Haverford yearbook, giving a 
pictorial and literary review of the year's College activities. 
Positions are open for students interested in creative 
photography, writing, layout, and advertising. Editors and 
staff will be named early in the school year. 



Revue. The Revue is published twice during the school 
year. It includes the literary creations of interested members 
of the Haverford and Bryn Mawr College communities. 

Sailing Club. The Sailing Club, a regular part of the 
Athletic Department, is open to all students, regardless of 
experience. In the fall and spring, all members participate in 
afternoon sailing practices on the Schuylkill River with the 
Club's three Firefly dinghies and power launch. New members 
are taught the basics of sailing and subsequently may, by 
qualifying in intra-club regattas, join the Varsity Racing Team 
and participate in the Club's regularly scheduled intercollegiate 
regattas. Interested students should contact Richard Fite, '70, 
Commodore. 

Schuetz Singers. This small, intensively rehearsed musical 
group draws its membership from both the Haverford Glee 
Club and the Bryn Mawr Chorus. It performs at regular Glee 
Club concerts and at other selected occasions during the year. 

Social Action Committee. The Haverford Social Action 
Committee (SAC) provides an organizational structure for 
independently initiated social action programs and activities. 
Any student who would like to do something about a 
particular social or political problem should talk with Andrew 
Dunham, '69, SAC president, or to any member of the steering 
committee. The steering committee will do what it can to 
inform the student of ongoing activity in his area of interest, 
to inform him of resources available for use, and to help him 
organize new activities if the present ones do not seem 
sufficient. SAC can be particularly helpful in providing funds 
for films and speakers. 

For individuals interested in continuing discussion and 
group action of a more general type, there are two relevant 
groups on campus: a group dedicated to the practice and 
principles of nonviolent action, and a chapter of Students for a 
Democratic Society (SDS). 

Student Chamber Group. All students who play musical 
instruments are invited to join the Haverford-Bryn Mawr 
Chamber Orchestra. The Orchestra sight-reads numerous major 
works in the repertory and gives occasional performances at 
Bryn Mawr and Haverford. The Orchestra is under the musical 
direction of Richard Serota, '69, and the management of 
Stanley Walens, '69. All interested students are urged to 



contact them as soon as possible after the beginning of the fall 
semester. The Orchestra is a member of O.I.M.G. 

Haverford-Bryn Mawr SDS. The members of the Haver- 
ford-Bryn Mawr chapter of Students for a Democratic Society 
seek to create a community of educational and political con- 
cern. They will organize around educational reform, racism, 
the draft, and other issues which affect the lives of college 
students, seeking to present a radical viewpoint on the campus. 

Organizational meetings will be held early in the fall 
semester. Students may participate as national members, 
chapter members, or occasionally. 

Varsity Club. The Varsity Club works to increase interest 
and participation in athletics at Haverford. The Qub also 
co-sponsors the Varsity Weekend Dance during the traditional 
Swarthmore Weekend. Those students at Haverford who have 
been awarded their "H" in a varsity sport are eligible for 
permanent membership. 

WHRC. WHRC, the joint Haverford-Bryn Mawr radio 
station, broadcasts at 640 kilocycles as a restricted-radiation, 
carrier-current station. The station operates 24 hours a day 
from its studios in the Haverford Union and can be received in 
the dormitories at both colleges. In addition to providing 
musical entertainment for all tastes, WHRC broadcasts 
information about up-coming events on both campuses 
regularly throughout its evening schedule. Charles Hedrick, 
'70, Station Manager. 

Phi Beta Kappa (Honorary). The Zeta Chapter of Phi Beta 
Kappa Society in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania was 
established at Haverford in 1808. Its membership includes 
about 650 Alumni. 

The annual meeting of the chapter for the election of new 
members from the Senior and Junior classes is held during 
Commencement Week. The method of election to Phi Beta 
Kappa is as follows' 

A weighted average of the grades for the four college years 
is calculated, the weights given to the Freshman, Sophomore, 
Junior, and Senior grades being respectively 1 , 2, 3, and 4. The 
Phi Beta Kappa average thus obtained is the principal factor in 
determining eligibility as a candidate, but consideration is also 
given to other evidences of scholarly achievement and to such 
qualities as intellectual vigor, originality, respect for truth, and 
interest in general scholarship. 

The number elected from any class depends upon the 
general excellence of that class. By decision of the chapter at 
its annual meeting in 1956, the number elected at the end of 
the Junior year should not, in general, exceed 5% of the class. 
The total number elected before graduation from any class 
will, in general, be limited to 15%. 

Triangle and Beta Rho Sigma (alumni social). Triangle and 
Beta Rho Sigma are social groups which have been in existence 
for several decades. They are strictly alumni organizations 
which admit an unspecified number of Seniors to membership. 

CONSTITUTION OF THE STUDENTS' 
ASSOCIATION OF HAVERFORD COLLEGE 

Article I 

Preamble 

Section 1 . Name - The name of this Association shall be 



341 



the Students' Association of Haverford College. 

Section 2. Membership — All undergraduates pursuing 
studies at Haverford College are ipso facto members of the 
Students' Association. 

Section 3. Powers - All powers hereinafter defined derive 
from the Students' Association and are delegated by it to such 
bodies of its own creation as are needful to carry out the 
functions of student self-government. 

Section 4. Right of Self-Government — The right of 
student self-government is granted by the Administration of 
Haverford College to the Students' Association provided that 
the Students' Association maintains the standards of the 
College to the satisfaction of the Administration and complies 
with the charter of the Student Affairs Committee. 



Article II 

Legislative Powers 

Section 1 . Regulations and Council Rules- 

1. The Students' Association shall make Regulations 
governing the conduct of students on campus. Regulations 
pertaining to the Honor System shall be enacted by a 
two-tliirds vote of a meeting of the Association. Other 
Regulations shall be enacted by a majority vote of a meeting 
of the Association. Every member of the Association is 
responsible for enforcement of these Regulations. Should the 
Administration find any Regulation unacceptable the dispute 
shall be referred to three responsible and impartial persons, 
satisfactory to the Association and the Administration. 

2. The Students' Association delegates such legislative 
authority to the Students' Council as is necessary to carry out 
the functions of the Council herein provided for. Such 
legislation shall be posted on prominent campus bulletin 
boards and shall be reported to the members of the 
Association at dormitory sessions, provided for in Section 2, 
paragraph 4, of this article. The Students' Association reserves 
to itself the ultimate legislative authority to be exercised only 
in plenary session. 

Section 2. Meetings of the Association- 

1 . The Students' Association shall meet in plenary session 
within the first two weeks of each semester. 

2. The President of the Students' Association shall call a 
plenary session of the Students' Association whenever he 
deems it necessary, by posting a notice on prominent campus 
bulletin boards at least seventy-two hours before the time of 
the meeting, in which case a quorum shall consist of twenty 
per cent of the members of the Students' Association; if the 
President considers that an emergency exists which prevents 
liim from giving due notice as provided above, the number of 
students required for a quorum shall be forty per cent of the 
Students' Association. 

3. Items of business intended for action by a plenary 
session c, the Association shall be handed in writing to the 
President t least forty-eight hours before the meeting, if not 
an emergency session as herein described. The President shall 
post the agenda of the plenary session at least twenty-four 
hours before the meeting, if not an emergency session. 

4. There shall be held each semester at least one meeting 
of the members of the Students' Association in dormitory 
session. The number and size of dormitory groupings shall be 
determined by the Students' Council, but the number of 
groupings shall not be less than ten. At least one grouping shall 
be composed of non-resident undergraduates. The Council 
shall also set the times and dates for such meetings. 

5. The President shall call a plenary session of the 



Association in the manner provided for in paragraph 2 of this 
section whenever he receives a petition signed by thirty 
members of the Association stating the purpose for which the 
plenary session shall be called. The Council shall call 
dormitory sessions of the Association whenever it receives a 
petition signed by thirty members of the Association stating 
the purpose for which the dormitory session shall be called. 
Such plenary and dormitory meetings shall be held within 
seven days of the receipt of the petition. Nothing shall be 
considered at such meetings except the matters stated in the 
petition. 

6. The Haverford Rules of Parliamentary Procedure shall 
be the authorized and final guide in all parliamentary 
procedure except wherein it confiicts with the Constitution of 
the Students' Association or the Regulations of the Students' 
Association. The Secretary of the Students' Association shall 
have with him at plenary sessions of the Association a copy of 
The Haverford Rules of Parliamentary Procedure. 



Article III 
Executive Powers 

Section 1. Students' Council - The executive power of 
the Students' Association is vested in a Students' Council. 

Section 2. Membership of the Students' Council- The 
members of the Students' Council shall be the Officers of the 
Students' Association and the Class Representatives. 

Section 3. Meeting of the Students' Council- The 
President of the Students' Association shall call a meeting of 
the Students' Council at least once each month. A quorum of 
the Council shall consist of two-thirds of its members. Upon 
the written request of at least three members of the Students' 
Council, an official meeting of that body shall be immediately 
called. Legislative and executive sessions of the Students' 
Council, except those concerned exclusively with 
appointments and awards, shall be public. The agenda for 
non-judicial Council meetings shall be posted on prominent 
campus bulletin boards at least twenty-four hours before each 
meeting. 

Section 4. Nomination of Association Officers- 
Nominations for the offices of President, Secretary, and 
Treasurer of the Students' Association shall open on the first 
Tuesday of the second semester. Nominations shall close on 
the following Friday. Nominations for the Office of President 
shall be restricted to the members of the Junior Class; 
nominations for the Offices of Secretary and Treasurer shall be 
restricted to members of the Sophomore Class. Should there 
be more than four (4) candidates nominated for any office, 
there shall be a primary election for that office on the 
Wednesday following the close of nominations, to be 
conducted by the preferential system. Space shall be provided 
for write-in votes. The four highest candidates shall then enter 
the final election for that office. 

Section 5. Election of Officers and Class Representatives. 

1 . On the Friday following the first Tuesday of the second 
semester, the Students' Association shall vote by secret ballot 
to elect from the Junior Class a President, and from the 
Sophomore Class a Secretary and Treasurer. Voting shall be 
held according to the preferential system; space shall be 
provided for write-in votes. If, for any reason, more than one 
election is required to secure a vaUd vote, subsequent voting 
shall be called for the President within twenty-four hours of 
the previous voting. Votes must be officially cast by at least 
forty per cent of the membership of the Students' Association 
for the election to be vaUd. 



2. During the third week of the second semester, each 
class shall elect from its membership its Representatives to the 
Students' Council by a preferential system of voting. The 
Junior Class shall elect three Representatives; the' Sophomore 
Class, two Representatives; and the Freshman Class, four 
Representatives. The elections of the Class Representatives 
shall be conducted by the respective Class Officers. Votes must 
be officially cast by at least forty per cent of the membership 
of a class for the election of its Class Representatives to be 
valid. 

3. The President of the entering Freshman Class shall be a 
Class Representative. During the second and third weeks of 
October each year the Freshman Class shall elect by a 
preferential system three additional Representatives, the exact 
date to be set by the Students' Council. 

4. The Students' Council shall have final authority over 
the procedure for all elections. 

Section 6. Assumption of Office- The Council members 
elected in the manner provided for in Sections 4 and 5 of this 
article shall assume office on the third Sunday of the second 
semester. Council members elected at other times will assume 
office immediately upon their election. 

Section 7. Duties of the Council and the Association 
Officers- 

1. The Students' Council shall execute the Regulations 
legislated by the Students' Association, supervise all 

extra-curricular activities with the exception of athletics, and 
perform other duties as herein provided. 

2. The President of the Students' Association shall preside 
at all plenary sessions of the Association and at all meetings of 
the Students' Council. He shall conduct the election of 
Association Officers and shall certify and publish the results of 
said elections, specifying the names of candidates nominated 
or elected. Each year he shall present to the Freshman Class 
the system of student government. In the absence of the 
Secretary or the Treasurer from any plenary session of the 
Students' Association or the meeting of the Students' Council, 
the President shall appoint from the other members of the 
Council a Secretary pro tempore or a Treasurer pro tempore. 

3. The Secretary of the Students' Association shall keep in 
permanent form minutes of all plenary sessions of the 
Association and of all meetings of the Council. He shall 
publish or post on prominent campus bulletin boards the 
minutes of all plenary sessions and of all public Council 
meetings, and the results of all closed Council meetings. If the 
Office of President is vacant or if the President is absent from 
any plenary session of the Association or meeting of the 
Council, the Secretary shall act as President pro tempore and 
appoint from the members of the Council a Secretary pro 
tempore. 

4. The Treasurer of the Students' Association shall 
disburse the funds of the Students' Association and shall keep 
a permanent record of all transactions. Wlien retiring from 
office, he shall post or publish for the inspection of members 
of the Students' Association a summary of his accounts. 

Section 8. Committees- 

1. Upon taking office each new Council shall appoint a 
Rules Committee, an Honor System Committee, a Customs 
Committee, a Curriculum Committee, and a Dormitory 
Committee. 

2. The Students' Council shall have the power to appoint 
temporary committees whenever it deems such appointments 
necessary to aid in the execution of its duties. 



Article IV 
Judicial Power 

Section 1. Functions- The judicial power of the Students' 
Association is vested in the Students' Council, ythich shall 
meet in judicial session, discuss the matter in question, and 
respond with the course of action which it believes most 
beneficial to the individual and the other members of the 
community. 

Section 2. Penalties- The Council shall impose penalties 
within such limits as the Students' Association may prescribe. 

Article V 

Resignation and Removal of Officers and Representatives 

Section 1. Vacancies- 

1 . In the event of the resignation or removal of an Officer 
of the Students' Association, the Association shall 
immediately fill the vacancy with a member of the same class 
according to the election procedure specified herein. In the 
interim the vacancy shall be filled by the pro tempore 
replacements provided for herein. 

2. Should the vacancy occur among the Class 
Representatives, it shall immediately be filled by the class 
whose representation has been reduced, according to the 
election procedure specified herein. 

Section 2. Removal- 

1. Any Officer of the Students' Association shall be 
removed for malfeasance or neglect of office or other good 
cause by not less than a two-thirds vote of a plenary session of 
the Students' Association. 

2. The Council shall call a plenary session for this purpose 
at its own discretion or on the petition of thirty members of 
the Students" Association. 

3. Any Class Representative shall be removed for 
malfeasance or neglect of office or other good cause by not 
less than two-thirds vote of at least forty per cent of the 
members of the Class which he represents. 

Article VI 

The Honor System 

Section 1 . Standards - 

1. Each student shall be responsible for his proper 
conduct in all scholastic work. 

2. Each student shall be responsible for his proper 
conduct vH\\ respect to women guests and the individuals 
comprising the Haverford College Community. 

3. Each student shall accept the Haverford Honor System 
realizing that it is his responsibility to uphold the Honor 
System and the attitude of personal and collective honor on 
which it is based. 

Section 2. Implementation- 

1 . A plenary session of the Students' Association shall be 
held during the first two weeks of the second semester of each 
year to formulate a set of regulations to implement the 
standards of the Honor System. These regulations alone shall 
determine the conduct which students must observe under the 
standards of the Honor System set forth in Article VI, Section 
I, Paragraphs one, two and three of the Constitution and shall 
appear as Article I of the Regulations of the Students' 
Association. Though the Students' Council may issue 
interpretations which will define that Council's understanding 
of specific matters pertaining to the Honor System, only 
legislative action of a plenary session of the Students' 



Association shall be considered in any way a part of the 
Regulations. Any violation of these Regulations shall be 
deemed a violation of the Honor System. 

2. Each entering student shall, upon his agreement to 
enter Haverford College, sign the following pledge: "I hereby 
accept the Haverford Honor System realizing it is my 
responsibility to uphold the Honor System and the attitude of 
personal and collective honor on which it is based." 

3. After each of his examinations each student shall sign 
on his examination paper the following pledge: "I accept full 
responsibility under the Haverford Honor System for my 
conduct on this examination." 

Section 3. Enforcement - The studertt who believes that 
his actions may be in conflict with the principles of 
responsibility and respect inherent in the Honor System shall 
immediately discuss the matter with a member of Students' 
Council. Should a student believe that the actions of another 
may be in conflict with the Honor System, he shall 
immediately discuss the matter with the student concerned. If 
after discussion either student finds said actions to be in 
possible conflict with the Honor System, the student whose 
actions are in question shall bring the matter to Students' 
Council within a week. After a week the responsibility for 
bringing the matter to Students' Council rests with each 
student aware of the actions and involved in the discussions. 

Article VII 

Amendments 

Section 1. Proposal— Amendments to this Constitution 
may be proposed by theStudents' Council or by action taken 
in a plenary session of the Students' Association called for that 
purpose. 

Section 2. Ratification- Amendments shall be ratified by 
a two-thirds vote of a plenary session of the Students' 
Association. 

Section 3. Approval- Amendments shall not go into 
effect until they are approved by the President of the College. 

Article VIII 

Previous Constitution Invalid 

With the enactment of this Constitution all previous 
Constitutions of the Students' Association of Haverford 
College shall be rendered null and void. 



NEWLY PROPOSED CONSTITUTION 

OF THE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION 

OF HAVERFORD COLLEGE 



Article I 

Preamble 

Section 1 . Name- The name of this Association shall be 
the Students' Association of Haverford College. 

Section 2. Membership- All students enrolled at 
Haverford College are ipso facto members of the Students' 
Association. 

Section 3. Powers- All powers herein defined derive from 
the Students' Association and are delegated by it to such 
bodies of its own creation as are needful to carry out the 
functions of student self-government. 

Section 4. Right of self-government- The right of student 
self-government is granted by the Administration of Haverford 



College to the Students' Association provided that the 
Students' Association maintains the standards of the College 
to the satisfaction of the Administratioa 



Article II 

Legislative Powers 

Section 1. Regulations and Council Rules- 

1. The Students' Association shall make Regulations 
governing the conduct of students on campus. Regulations 
pertaining to the Honor System shall be enacted by a 
two-thirds vote of a meeting of the Association. Every member 
of the Association is responsible for enforcement of these 
Regulations. Should the Administration find any Regulation 
unacceptable, the dispute shall be referred to three responsible 
and impartial persons, satisfactory to the Association and the 
Administration. 

2. The Students' Association delegates such legislative 
authority to the Students' Council as is necessary to carry out 
the functions of the Council herein provided for. Such 
legislation shall be well-publicized and shall be reported to the 
members of the Association at hall meetings, provided for in 
Article III, Section 9. The Students' Association reserves to 
itself the ultimate legislative authority, to be exercised only in 
plenary session. 

Section 2. Meetings of the Association - 

1 . The Students' Association shall meet in plenary session 
within the first three weeks of each semester. 

2. The President of the Students' Association shall call a 
plenary session of the Students" Association whenever he 
deems it necessary, by publicizing it as far in advance as 
possible of the time scheduled for the plenary session. The 
number of students required for a quorum shall be forty per 
cent of the Students' Association. 

3. The President shall call a plenary session of the 
Association in the manner provided for in paragraph 2 of this 
section whenever he receives a petition signed by ten per cent 
of the members of the Association stating the purpose for 
which the plenary session shall be called. Such plenary sessions 
shall be held within seven (7) days of the receipt of the 
petition. 

4. The President shall publicize the agenda of any plenary 
session as far in advance of the meeting as possible. 

5. The "Haverford Rules of Parliamentary Procedure" 
shall be the authorized and final guide in all parliamentary 
procedure except wherein it confiicts with the Constitution of 
the Students' Association or the Regulations of the Students' 
Association. The President of the Association shall appoint, 
upon assumption of office, a Parliamentarian from the 
members of the Students' Council. The Secretary of the 
Students' Association shall have with him at plenary sessions 
of the Association a copy of "the Haverford Rules of 
Parliamentary Procedure." 

Article III 

Executive Powers 

Section 1 . Students ' Council- 

The executive power of the Students' Association is 
vested in a Students' Council. 

Section 2. Membership of the Students' Council- 

The members of the Students' Council shall be the 
officers in the Executive Committee of the Students' 
Association and the Hall Representatives. 

Section 3. Meeting of the Students' Council- 



The President of the Students' Association shall call a 
meeting of the Students' Council at least once each month. A 
quorum of the Council shall consist of representatives from 
two-thirds of the hall groupings. Upon the written request of 
at least five members of the Students' Council, an official 
meeting of that body shall be called immediately. Legislative 
and executive sessions of the Students' Council, except those 
concerned exclusively with appointments and awards, shall be 
public. The agenda for Council meetings shall be 
well-publicized as soon as possible before each meeting. 

Section 4. Nomination and Election of Officers in the 
Executive Committee of the Students' Association- 

1. Nominations for the offices of the Executive 
Committee — President, First Vice-President, Second 
Vice-President, Secretary, and Treasurer — of the Students' 
Association shall open on the second Friday of the second 
semester and shall close on the following Tuesday. 
Nominations for the offices of President and of First and 
Second Vice-Presidents shall be restricted to members of the 
Junior Class; nominations for the offices of Secretary and 
Treasurer shall be restricted to members of the Sophomore 
Class. Should there be more than four (4) candidates 
nominated for any office, there shall be a primary election for 
that office on the Monday following the close of nominations, 
to be conducted according to the preferential system. Space 
shall be provided for write-in votes. The four (4) highest 
candidates shall then enter the final election for this office. 

2. On the Monday following the third Friday of the 
second semester, the Students' Association shall vote by secret 
ballot to elect the members of the Executive Committee. 
Voting shall be held according to the preferential system; 
space shall be provided for write-in votes. If, for any reason, 
more than one election is required to secure a valid vote, or if 
a primary election is necessary, subsequent voting shall be 
called for by the Executive Committee within twenty-four 
hours of the previous voting. Votes must be cast officially by 
at least forty per cent of the membership of the Students' 
Association for the election to be valid. 

Section 5. Selection of Hall Representatives- 
Each hall grouping, whose dimensions shall be stipulated 
by the Students' Council, by a method of its own choosing 
shall designate from itself a representative to the Students' 
Council within the first three weeks of the first semester of 
each year, the exact date to be specified by the Executive 
Committee. At the time of selection, each hall grouping shall 
determine the procedure by which the representative shall be 
removed from office, as provided for in Article V, Section II, 
paragraph 2. Upon selection, each Hall Representative shall 
designate from his hall grouping an alternate representative, 
who shall represent his hall in the absence of the regular 
representative. Any dispute about the selection of a Hall 
Representative arising among the members of a hall grouping 
shall be referred to the Executive Committee. 

Section 6. Nomination and Election of Members of the 
Honor System Council of the Students' Association- 

1. Nominations for members of the Honor System 
Council shall open on the Tuesday following the third Friday 
of the second semester and shall close on the following Friday. 
The Freshman Class shall elect three (3) freshmen, the 
Sophomore Class three (3) sophomores, and the Junior Class 
one (I) junior to serve with the President and First 
Vice-President on the Honor System Council. 

2. On, the Monday following the close of nominations, 
each class shall vote by secret ballot to elect its members of 
the Honor System Council. Voting shall be held according to 
the preferential system of voting. Votes must be cast officially 



by forty per cent of the membership of a class for the election 
to be valid. 

3. Within two weeks followng the selection of Hall 
Representatives, the exact date to be specified by the 
Executive Committee, the Freshman Class shall elect three (3) 
freshmen to serve on the Honor System Council. 

4. The Executive Committee shall have final authority 
over the procedure for all elections. 

Section 7. Assumption of Office- 

1 . The officers in the Executive Committee of the Stu- 
dents' Association elected in the manner provided for in Sec- 
tion 4 of this article shall assume office on the fourth Sunday 
of the second semester. 

2. The Hall Representatives selected in the manner 
provided for in Section 5 of this article shall assume office on 
the date, specified by the Executive Committee, by wliich 
each hall grouping is to have selected its representative. 

3. The members of the Honor System Council of the 
Students' Association elected in the manner provided for in 
Section 6 of this article shall assume office on the day they are 
elected. 

Section 8. Duties of the Council and the Officers In the 
Executive Committee of the Students' Assoclatlon- 

1. The Students' Council shall supervise the Regulations 
legislated by the Students' Association, all extra-curricular 
activities with the exception of athletics, and perform other 
duties as herein provided. 

2. The President of the Students' Association shall preside 
at all plenary sessions of the Association and at all meetings of 
the Students' Council. He shall conduct the election of officers 
in the Executive Committee of the Association and shall 
certify and publish the results of these elections, specifying the 
names of candidates nominated or elected. Each year he shall 
supervise the presentation of the system of student 
self-government to the Freshman Class. In the absence of 
either of the Vice-Presidents, the Secretary, or the Treasurer 
from any plenary session, the President shall appoint from the 
other members of the Council, a Vice-President, Secretary, or 
Treasurer pro tempore. He shall serve as a member of the 
Honor System Council. He shall nominate, with the 
concurrence of the Executive Committee, student 
representatives to faculty-student committees, at least one for 
each committee from the other members of Council. He shall 
nominate, also with the concurrence of the Executive 
Committee, at least one member of Council to each Students' 
Council Committee. 

3. The First Vice-President of the Students' Association 
shall serve as Chairman of the Honor System Council and shall 
carry out the Council's responsibility in working with the 
Dean of Students in disciplinary actions under the Code of 
Student Responsibility, if the office of President is vacant or if 
the President is absent from any plenary session of the 
Association or meeting of the Council, the First Vice-President 
shall act as President pro tempore. 

4. The Second Vice-President of the Students' Association 
shall serve as coordinator of all faculty-student and Students' 
Council Committees. He shall bear primary responsibility for 
drawing up the agenda for each Council meeting and for 
publicizing it before the meeting to the Hall Representatives 
and the rest of the student body. He shall also be responsible 
for soliciting committee reports and for summarizing them 
periodically in a report to the Hall Representatives. 

5. The Secretary of the Students' Association shall keep in 
permanent form minutes of all plenary sessions of the 
Association and of all meetings of the Council. He shall 



341 



publicize the minutes of all plenary sessions and of all Council 
meetings. 

6. The Treasurer of the Students' Association shall 
disburse the funds of the Students' Association and shall keep 
a permanent record of all transactions. He shall appoint from 
the Students' Council an Assistant Treasurer. When retiring 
from office, he shall post or publish for the inspection of the 
members of the Students' Association a summary of his 
accounts. 

Section 9. Duties of Hall Representatives- 

The Hall Representative shall hold hall meetings to discuss 
the issues on the agenda of each Council meeting. He shall be 
responsible for communicating the views of the members of 
the hall to Council or to any of its committees. He shall dis- 
cuss any action of Council or its committees with the members 
of his hall. 

Section 10. Duties of the Honor System Council of the 
Studen ts ' A ssociation - 

The Honor System Council of the Students' Association 
shall administer all aspects of the Honor System, including 
judicial power herein described and the responsibilities of 
interpretation of specific matters pertaining to the Honor 
System. The Honor System Council shall also be responsible 
for those aspects of the Code of Student Responsibility 
brought to its attention by the First Vice-President. Each year, 
the Honor System Council shall present the Honor System to 
the Freshman Class. 

Section 11. Committees- 

Each Students' Council shall have the power to establish 
such committees as it deems necessary to aid in the execution 
of its duties. 



Article IV 

Judicial Power 

Section \. Functions- 

The judicial power of the Students' Association is vested 
in the Honor System Council, which shall meet in judicial 
session, discuss the matter in question, and respond with the 
course of action which it believes most beneficial to the 
individual and the other members of the community. 

Section 2. Scope of Action- 

The Honor System Council shall take action within such 
limits as the Students' Association may prescribe. 



Article V 

Resignation and Removal of Officers and Representatives 

Section 1. Vacancies- 

1 . In the event of the resignation or removal of an officer 
in the Executive Committee of the Students' Association, the 
Association shall fill immediately the vacancy with a member 
of the appropriate class according to the election procedure 
specified herein. In the interim the vacancy shall be filled by 
the pro tempore replacements provided for herein. 

2. Should a vacancy occur among the members of the 
Honor System Council, it shall be filled immediately by the 
class whose representation has been reduced, according to the 
election procedure specified herein. 

3. Should a vacancy occur among the Hall Representatives 
when a representative ceases to reside on the hall or when he 
assumes an elective Council office, it shall be filled 
immediately, according to the selection procedure specified 
herein. 



Section 2. Removal- 

1. Any officer in the Executive Committee of the 
Students" Association shall be removed from office for 
malfeasance or neglect of duty or other good cause by not less 
than a two-thirds vote of a plenary session of the Students' 
Association. The Council shall call a plenary session for this 
purpose at its own discretion or on the petition of ten per cent 
of the Students' Association. 

2. Any Hall Representative shall be removed from office 
for any good cause by the hall grouping which he represents, 
using the procedure chosen by that hall grouping at the 
selection of the representative, as outlined in Article IV, 
Section 5. Any dispute about the removal of a hall 
representative arising among the members of a hall grouping 
shall be referred to the Executive Committee. 

3. Any member of the Honor System Council shall be 
removed from office for malfeasance or neglect of duty or 
other good cause by not less than a two-thirds vote of at least 
forty per cent of the members of the class which he 
represented, to be conducted in a general meeting of that class. 



Article VI 

Amendments 

Section 1 . Proposal- 
Amendments to this Constitution may be proposed by the 

Students' Council or by action taken in a plenary session of 

the Students' Association called for that purpose. 
Section 2. Ratification 
Amendments shall be ratified by a two-thirds vote of a 

plenary session of the Students' Association. 
Section 3. Approval 
Amendments shall go into effect upon approval by the 

President of the College. 

Article VII 

Implementation and Provisional Basis of This Constitution 

Section \. Implementation - 
The present Students" Council shall take immediate steps 
to implement this Constitution upon its ratification. 
Section 2. Provisional Basis 

Upon its ratification, this Constitution shall be considered 
provisional. A plenary session shall be called for the purpose of 
a vote on the final acceptance or rejection of this Constitution. 
This plenary session shall be held no later than February, 
1970. At this time, if this Constitution is rejected, the previous 
Constitution will be operative; if this Constitution is accepted, 
this Article shall be considered null and void, and shall be 
replaced by the following Article: 

Article VIII 

Previous Constitution Invahd 
With the enactment of this Constitution all previous 
Constitutions of the Students" Association of Haverford 
College shall be rendered null and void. 



10 



II. The Honor System 

"It is essential that the 

student acquire an understanding of and 

a lively feeling for values. He must 

acquire a vivid sense of the beautiful and of 

the morally good. Otherwise he — with his 

specialized knowledge - more closely resembles 

a well-trained dog than 

a harmoniously developed person. 

-Albert Einstein 




THE HONOR SYSTEM - INTRODUCTION 

The Honor System enables students to have certain privi- 
leges that they otherwise would not enjoy. With the accep- 
tance of these freedoms comes a responsibility for each indiv- 
idual to maintain the system's social and academic standards. 
It is not necessary that one's own sense of honor be in agree- 
ment with that implied or stated in the Honor System; the 
student's obligation is bound by the Honor System whenever 
it applies to his actions. 

THE HONOR SYSTEM- 
CONSTITUTIONAL STANDARDS 

1. Each student shall be responsible for his proper 
conduct in all scholastic work. 

2. Each student shall be responsible for his proper 
conduct with respect to women guests and the individuals 
comprising the Haverford College Community. 

3. All scholastic conduct and conduct involving women 
guests on campus is covered by Article VI, Section 3, 
Enforcement. Students are expected to resolve conflicts which 
involve only members of the Haverford College Community by 
discussion among themselves. If unable to resolve the conflicts, 
students may bring the matter to the Students' Council. 

4. Each student shall accept the Haverford Honor System 
realizing that it is his responsibility to uphold the Honor 
System and the attitude of personal and collective honor on 
which it is based. 

HONOR SYSTEM REGULATIONS 

During Examinations 

1. No student shall give or receive aid. 

2. No person shall act as an official proctor. 

3. Students shall obey all restrictions which the professor 
may prescribe as to time, place, and material aids to be used. 



In The Preparation of Papers 

1. A student shall never represent another person's ideas 
or scholarship as his own. He shall indicate his sources by 
using, where appropriate, quotation marks, footnotes, and a 
bibliography. 

2. Professors may; 

a) require that a paper not be proofread by others. 

b) prescribe limitations on the sources to be used. 

c) waive any requirements concerning the crediting of 
sources. 

3. Permission must be obtained in advance from all profes- 
sors concerned if a paper is to be submitted for credit in more 

, than one course. 

In the Preparation of Written Homework 
and Laboratory Reports 

1 . Students may work together, provided that each mem- 
ber of the group understands the work being done. 

2. All data must be reported by the student as observed in 
his experiment. 

3. Professors may: 

a) require that secondary sources consulted be credited. 

b) waive any restrictions in 1 and 2 of this paragraph. 

Responsibility For Observing Special Requirements 

A student is responsible for observing any requirements 
which the professor announces under the option specified 
above. 

Women Guests 

1. Any act involving women guests which fails to show 
proper respect for women guests and/or individuals who com- 
prise the Haverford College Community shall be brought to 
the attention of a member of Students' Council. 

2. Students are expected to exercise good judgment as to 
a reasonable hour of departure of women from the dormitory, 
taking into consideration the convenience of other students 
and any possible reflection on the reputation of the woman 
guest, the individual student, and the College. Specific time 
limits become unnecessary if students act with concern for 
their fellow students and women guests. Every student should 
recognize that this freedom to exercise individual judgment as 
to a reasonable hour of departure of women guests, like all 
other freedoms in the Honor System, is dependent on his abil- 
ity to exercise responsibility. 

HONOR SYSTEM INTERPRETATIONS 

Students' Council issues interpretations which define its 
understanding of specific matters pertaining to the Honor 
System. These interpretations are not a body of rules but an 
indication of the general manner in which Council deals with 
possible violations when they arise. Any student brought 
before Council for discussion of a possible Honor System 
violation is considered individually, the Student's Association, 
in granting certain judicial powers to the Council, recognizes 
each person and each incident as having unique characteristics. 
Consequently, flexibility of evaluation in an Honor System 
discussion is necessary if the rights and freedoms granted by 
the Honor System are to be preserved and guaranteed. Past 
Students' Councils issued the following interpretations as 
general guidelines to aid all students in the constant 
re-evaluation necessary to the continuation of a true and viable 
Honor System at Haverford. The present Council hopes that it 
will be able to conduct discussions of particular matters 
relating to the Honor System with groups of students and that 



11 



the results of these discussions will be used in preparing a set 
of Honor System interpretations which take into consideration 
the broad spectrum of student opinion. 

Academic Interpretations, 1965-1966. Article I, Section 
1, Paragraph of the Regulations; "A student shall never 
represent another person's ideas or scholarship as his own. He 
shall indicate his sources by using where appropriate quotation 
marks, footnotes, and a bibliography." 

This clause is not meant to stifle or restrain intellectual 
exploration in any form. With regard to discussions and other 
secondary sources, one may assimilate another person's 
thoughts into those in his own paper without 
acknowledgement; but one's replacement of his own structure 
of ideas with that of another must be properly footnoted. 

The Academic section of the Honor System applies to all 
work submitted in all courses taken at Haverford, regardless of 
where the work is done. It also apphes to all work done in 
courses taken at other schools for credit at Haverford during 
the academic year. 

The Council recognizes that the academic section of the 
Honor System is for the most part clear. Where undefined 
areas still remain, it is the responsibiUty of the student to 
inquire of the professor how the standards 'of the System 
apply to his particular course. 

Interpretations Regarding Final Examinations. Haverford 
students have the privilege of scheduhng their own mid-year 
and final examinations. The self-scheduhng system is unique to 
Haverford, and is a result of the Honor System and the 
responsibility assumed by students themselves. This has been 
accorded to students by the faculty, with the understanding 
that it may be withdrawn by the faculty at any time. 

The continued success, satisfaction, and pride which 
accrues from this system will come only from continued strict 
observance by students of the points of academic honor. 
Giving aid by carelessness can be almost as damaging as by 
intent. 

The Students' Council issued the following interpretations 
in regard to the self-scheduling of final exams, June 1964. 

The Council interprets Article I, Section l.A.l. of the 
Honor System which states that "no student shall give or 
receive aid" to mean that the communication, whether given 
or received, of aid regarding an examination to any student 
who is scheduled to take that examination is a possible 
violation of the Honor System. In general, the Council 
interprets "aid" to be knowledge of the form, content, or 
degree of difficulty of an examination which could possibly 
affect a student's performance on the examination. 

The Council includes "statements about the degree of 
difficulty" as possible violations because, implicitly, these 
statements often communicate information about the form or 
content of an examination, and because they initiate 
conversation that can lead to other violations. 

In a taken/not taken situation any conversation about the 
form, content, or degree of difficulty of an exam should be 
reported immediately as a possible violation. 

Any person overhearing any information about form, 
content, or degree of difficulty of any examination should ask 
the person who has been careless to talk to a Council member. 
The fact that a conversation has been overheard indicates a 
carelessness on the part of the student which could lead to a 
possible' violation. 

Any discussion of form, content, or degree of difficulty of 
any exam is discouraged. In any discussion in the taken/not 
taken situation precaution must be exercised. This precludes 



12 



any talking about exams in public places. 

All parties involved in any possible Honor System 
violation should report themselves immediately to a council 
member regardless of whether or not precaution had been 
taken or whether or not the incident was accidental. 

We remind the student body that the advantages of a 
self-scheduled examination system can be continued only if 
each student strictly adheres to the responsibihty inherent in 
such a system. 

Interpretations Regarding Women Guests, February 15, 
1967. It is necessary that the following be taken into account 
in entertaining women guests at Haverford College. The 
responsibility of each person's serious and continued 
consideration of all the following lies most generally with the 
entire community, and, more specifically, with all individuals 
directly involved with and aware of any actions. 

1 . Students' Council views the notion of consideration for the 
convenience of other students to include respect for a 
student's reasonably exercised right of privacy, as well as 
the recognition that conditions of privacy are not easily 
achieved and sustained in a small community. Dormitory 
living places highest priority on sleeping and studying. 
Whenever women are escorted into the dorms anywhere on 
campus, students should be aware that they are guests and 
deserve to be treated as such. It should also be recognized 
that lack of this respectful consideration can lead to 
inadvertent incidents of disrespect to women guests. 

2. Any activities that exploit or affront a woman guest are 
beyond the bounds of both individual and collective honor. 

3. Respect for a woman guest includes honoring the 
commitments she may have to institutions of which she is a 
member. 

4. Haverford College is a part of a larger social community. 
When private actions which offend pubhc mores become 
publicized and established patterns of behavior, they cause 
repercussions on the whole College Community and 
endanger the future existence of the Honor System. The 
presence of women guests on the Haverford campus 
overnight clearly fits into this category. 

5. Council encourages students to seek private 
accommodations for woman- visitors to the College. Such 
accommodations might well include (a) faculty homes, (b) 
Bryn Mawr dorms, or (c) entire suites or entries which have 
been cleared for housing weekend guests. 

When any person is concerned about the possible failure 
of another to give serious consideration to the preceding, he 
should follow the procedure outlined in Article VI, Section 3, 
of the Students' Association Constitution. 

In addition to the above Interpretations, the Students' 
Council, on March 19, 1967, issued the following policy 
statement relevant to disrespect of women guests: 

After meetings with students over incidents involving 
possible disrespect to women guests and/or the college 
community. Council realized that in a number of these cases 
any such disrespect resulted not from the behavior of the 
principal characters, but rather from action by onlookers and 
those accidentally involved. It must be emphasized that 
discord between members of the Haverford community due to 
the social behavior of one or another of those members is to 
be eased by discussion between the people involved. Barring 
this, the matter may properly be extended only to a member 
of Council or to Council as a whole. In fact, we 
wholeheartedly urge you to speak to Council in the event of 
an impasse or if you are aware of the existence of improper 
behavior. But the communication of suspicions, inferences, or 



even facts to third parties, with no right to such information, 
is not to be tolerated. 

Even an absence of conflict does not grant license to 
gossip. Loose talk frustrates any attempts at discretion which 
might have been made, and aggravates the results of any failure 
to make them. Further, the spreading of necessarily 
incomplete information is likely to damage the reputation of 
everyone involved and to have unpleasant repercussions for the 
College community. 

It is Council's feeling that rumor-mongering with regard to 
women guests may be as serious as the more generally 
recognized and direct forms of disrespectful action previously 
discussed, and that this statement serves only to expUcitly 
enunciate an idea already clearly implicit in the Honor System. 

THE HONOR SYSTEM REVIEWED AND 
REAFFIRMED - FEBRUARY 1968 

Largely as a result of President Coleman's Collection 
speech of January 30th, there has been a vigorous pubhc 
debate on the social aspects of the Honor System. Council 
members have participated as individuals; it is now Council's 
wish to present its collective position. 

One of our major concerns is the desirability for an 
individual to come to an honest reahzation of the 
consequences of his social acts - in other words, that he 
confront himself. He must actively reconcile his behavior with 
his conscience - actively, by searching and questioning; not 
passively, by suspension of inquiry. This suggests certain 
limitations to the role of external authority. A conscience 
cannot be coerced into activity. 

This is not to deny that external stimuli have a function in 
this area. Far from it: it is possible for an individual to enmesh 
himself in a web of unthinking behavior, losing or abdicating 
moral control of his actions. In such a situation, the shock of a 
forceful presentation of another, or perhaps of any, point of 
view may be necessary to jar the individual from his routine. 
The key word here is "forceful." To be forceful such a 
presentation must be seen as legitimate by the individual. Only 
then is he under moral compulsion to internalize that 
challenge; only if he so internalizes it will the desired result 
follow. Only then will the individual be forced to deal with 
any contradiction between his actual behavior and what he 
believes to be right behavior. It seems most unUkely, at this 
time and on this campus, that a rule forbidding a certain 
activity could produce that result. A reasoned, non-hostile, 
personal discussion probably could. 

We recognize the difficulty any man faces in approaching 
a person whose behavior is distressing to him. One reason for 
this difficulty is that a confrontation means subjecting one's 
own beliefs, not just those of the other individual, to a new 
examination. This is both necessary and desirable. A one-way 
confrontation is an inquisition, not an exchange of values. 

Here we run into a condition of administrative 
nebulousness. Clearly, an individual is not justified in refusing 
to accept a legitimate moral challenge to his behavior. He may 
end up refuting it, but he must accept it and deal with it on its 
own terms first. Yet how can an external judge say which 
challenges are legitimate and which not? Which have been 
refuted and which simply not accepted? These are questions 
which, we feel, are impossible to answer in a really meaningful 
way. An actual confrontation is an internal event, and thus not 
susceptible to objective verification. We demand that it occur, 
and we sincerely believe that if it does occur our moral goals 
will be within our grasp; yet by its very nature, we cannot 
guarantee nor verify its existence. We are forced to rely on 



341 



trust in the moral honesty of each individual and in the 
effectiveness of concrete situations in forcing confrontations 
upon him. We feel that this trust is neither unreasonable nor 
misplaced. 

One, then, cannot prescribe attitudes; that does not mean 
that one cannot attempt to influence them. The word "honor" 
is open to a wide variety of interpretations, some of which are 
more useful, both to the individual and to those around him, 
than others. One requirement of honorable behavior is that it 
allow the maintenance of individual self-respect. Thus, any 
behavior which compromises that self-respect (of either the 
actor or the acted-upon) must be unacceptable. The 
exploitation of one individual by another is contemptible. 
Human dignity is a valuable possession; let us not allow it to 
be destroyed by callous, brutal, or thoughtless behavior. These 
are clearly not administrative rules. In the strictest sense, they 
, are not rules at all, but simply precepts which should influence 
attitudes and behavior. If they make students consider and 
reconsider the effects of their social actions on themselves and 
others, then they will serve a firmer purpose than would 
administrative rules. 

We reaffirm that Council does not wish to embark on 
inquisitions in cases which come to its attention. This does not 
mean that Council renounces its obligation to participate in 
confrontations; Council shares the moral responsibihty of 
every member of the Haverford student body to make each 
confrontation an effective self-examination for all the 
participants. It does mean that Council does not intend to 
conduct hostile inquiries into the beliefs and morals of 
individuals who might come to its attention. 

Council is required, too, to deal with actions disruptive to 
stable group living conditions. Blatant indiscretion in social 
behavior is such an action. The fact that a man is morally at 
peace with his actions does not confer the right to impose the 
existence of those actions upon the sensitivites of other 
individuals. Discretion means consideration for the behefs of 
others, not an admission that one's own beliefs are wrong. 
Discretion at most involves inconvenience - a small price to 
pay for securing the peace of mine of one's fellows. 

It is clear that the difficulties of discretion in a student's 
relations with a woman guest increase as the frequency and/or 
length of her stay increase. If for no other reason, this would 
be cause for the exercise of restraint in this matter. Parallel 
with this, however, runs the problem of inconvenience to 
other students. It is to be expected that any visit of a woman 
guest in a dormitory overnight or to very late hours be viewed 
in the light of this problem, which is, of course, more severe in 
some living areas than in others. Even in the most favorable 
locations, however, some amount of difficulty is certain to 
arise. Whether it is so great as to make the continuance of the 
stay or stays undesirable is a matter to be settled among the 
students involved; such a course must, however, be considered 
by the student hosting the woman guest in the event of 
friction. 

To sum up: it is our feeling that the changes in the honor 
system have placed the concern for social behavior where it 
ought to be - on the largely internal interplay of moral 
decisions which control that behavior. The student is obligated 
to make these decisions under the scrutiny of his conscience, 
to accept the challenge of students whose views differ from his 
own, and to modify the decisions if it becomes clear that they 
were made upon an unsatisfactory basis. The vagueness of 
these precepts raises many problems, but they are problems 
which must be solved by the individual, not by external 
authority. Whatever the decisions may be, the student has a 
prime responsibility to see that the actions which result from 



13 



them do not impinge upon the sensitivities or, unless by 
consent, the convenience of others. 



III. Campus Guidelines 

"'Rules!' cried the 

boys. 'What fun are rules?' . . . 

'Double ice cream 

at supper time for the one with 

the best list of rules! ' Donald said. " 

-Donald Duck's Safety Book 



CODE OF STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY 

The basis of the code of Student Responsibility is the 
belief that individual freedom, as opposed to license, should be 
sought, and that this freedom can best be attained through the 
cooperation of each member of the community in avoiding 
actions which infringe upon the freedoms or well being of 
others. Its goal is also to encourage individuals to develop 
responsible judgement capable of directing their conduct with 
a minimum of specific rules. Set rules are seldom effective in 
establishing the inner sense of responsibility for which the 
College community stands. This personal responsibility is 
likely to grow when a student is both free and obligated to 
grapple with principles of conduct and to consider the possible 
consequences of his actions in the context of guidelines against 
which he can test his own actions and place them in a better 
perspective. The Code of Student Responsibility is a statement 
of such guidelines. 

Conduct in Community Life. In Collection, in Meeting, in 
the dining hall and in the student dormitories, courtesy should 
at all times be extended to guests and to other students. 

We should remind ourselves that our conduct and dress 
require our attention when we are dealing with people whom 
we, or others, haveinvited to the campus. 

We should also realize that the closest contact with fellow 
students arises in the dormitories. Any action or noise, 
especially at late hours, that disturbs others is undesirable. 

Meeting is 4 place for worship and should be respected as 
such. 

Faculty — Student Relationship. It should be recognized 
that all of us — students, faculty, administration, staff - have 
certain duties and responsibilities that can be legitimately 
expected of us. It is in the interest of Haverford to maintain 
close faculty-student relationships, but these must be built 
upon mutual courtesy and respect. 

Drinking. The Haverford student body has maintained a 
tradition as regards drinking which has prevented it from 
becoming the major problem here which it has become on 
some campuses. This tradition is worth maintaining. 

Student drinking of alcoholic beverages is not consistent 
with the history of the College, with the tenets of Friends' 
belief, with excellence in scholarship under the prevalent 
conditions of academic pressure, or with the maintenance of a 
healthy community. 

Prohibition is inconsistent with the freedom of individual 
development which is the proudest part of the life of the 
College. But liberty does not mean license. Drinking to excess 
in any form; drinking in public places on the campus; 



furnishing alcoholic beverages to minors; and any breach of 
taste induced or encouraged by drinking will not be tolerated. 
Students are advised that State laws make it illegal for 
minors to possess or consume alcoholic beverages. 

Drugs. The medically unsupervised use, possession or 
distribution of potentially harmful drugs such as 
hallucinogens, amphetamines, barbiturates and opiates is illegal 
and subject to very harsh penalties. Although the 
Administration does not assume the responsibility of acting as 
an arm of the law, students have no greater protection from 
the law than any citizen. It is also known that use of many of 
these drugs threatens the physical and mental health of the 
user. Use by one student may also threaten the welfare of 
other students. 

Thus, with the legal and medical welfare of the student in 
mind, the College cannot approve of the medically 
unsupervised use, possession or distribution of any of these 
drugs. 

General probihition of the use, possession or distribution 
of these drugs would be inconsistent with the philosophy of 
this Code. Yet, the absence of corrective action in some 
specific cases of such involvement may be equally inconsistent. 
Because the use, possession or distribution of these drugs poses 
a great potential danger to others, disciplinary action must 
always be considered when such activity occurs. The nature of 
any resultant discipliniary action will be proportional to the 
severity of the dangers to others. 

Because use of these drugs is often associated with 
medical and psychological problems, students involved in their 
use may be referred to the counseling and medical services. 

Property. The College, in acknowledging its responsibility 
to maintain the buildings and other facilities, expects the 
students to do their part in keeping the buildings in good 
order. 

While the College expects to take care of normal wear and 
tear, it is assumed that specific damage will be reported 
promptly by the individual student responsible, and that the 
costs involved in repair will be borne by that student. 

Damage to College property involves, among other things, 
disregard of the interests of fellow students. 

Disciplinary Actions. Disciplinary action which may limit 
a student's freedom, or even separate him from the College, is 
only taken when it is clear that discussion alone is not 
sufficient to end the irresponsible acts and that action is called 
for to protect the College and its students from serious 
damage. 

The Students' Council has the responsibility for 
establishing and maintaining the Honor System and for 
responding to actions inconsistent with it. Academic standards 
are established by the Faculty and administered by the Dean 
of the College. Academic deficiences of individual students are 
dealt with by the faculty Academic Standing Committee. The 
responsibility for non-academic and non-Honor System 
matters, as set forth in the Code of Student Responsibility and 
in other regulations, is shared by the Students' Council and the 
Dean of Students. 

The disciplinary process follows a carefully chosen 
procedure to insure that conditions of reason and fairness are 
not abridged. The Dean of Students and the Students' Council 
President each bring to the attention of the other any possible 
breach of responsible conduct which seems to require further 
action, including gathering added information. The Dean and 
the Council President discuss the relative seriousness of the 



14 



matter, and agree on how it should best be handled. Discussion 
with the student or students involved is often sufficient. If 
not, other actions are taken. 

If the matter is given to the Students' Council, it follows 
its regular procedure, and makes a recommendation to the 
administration on action to be taken. If the matter is given to 
the Dean of Students he confers with the student involved (1) 
to warn of possible disciplinary action and clarify the relevant 
standards, and (2) to get a full understanding of the facts and 
circumstances of the matter. There is a basic assumption of 
honesty in all such discussions. If, after this preliminary 
conversation, some further action still seems necessary, besides 
a referral for counseling, the Dean of Students drafts a 
statement of the case and a suggested course of action which 
he discusses with the Council President and with appropriate 
administrative colleagues. 

A letter is then prepared and subsequently discussed with 
the student which explains the relevant facts, the pertinent 
standard violated, and the resulting disciplinary action. In this 
letter, the student is advised of his right to appeal the decision 
to the Students' Council or to the President of the College. A 
decision resulting from an appeal is binding. 

All disciplinary actions are confidential, never leave school 
files, and are not noted on the student's transcript. Records of 
disciplinary actions are destroyed when the student is 
graduated from the College. 

By far the most common disciplinary action involves a 
probation which puts a student on notice that, for a specified 
period of time, certain expectations of conduct must be met 
and possibly that certain privileges have been withdrawn. 
Consequences of any violation of the terms of the probation 
are also defined and may range from further and more 
restrictive probation to actual separation from the College. 
Since the terms of the probation are designed to prevent a 
reoccurence of the misconduct, a student often suggests his 
own terms. A student is separated from the College 
immediately and without probation only when it is felt that 
continued serious misconduct is probable or when the 
consequences of even likely reoccurence are sufficiently 
serious so as to seriously damage other individuals in the 
community. This separation, like any other disciplinary action, 
follows the above procedures. 

While the office of the Dean of Students exists for the 
welfare of the students, it should be recognized that 
disciplinary actions are one of the several responsibilities of 
this office. Unlike the College counselors, the Dean of 
Students is not always free to accept information, in 
confidence, that could lead to disciplinary actions. Students 
should bear this in mind while discussing such matters with 
him. 

Summary. Pride in the College, in our sense of 
community, and in ourselves leads us to see ways of freeing 
ourselves from a strait-jacket of rules and regulations through 
the development of an approach to life on which we can all 
agree and for which we each feel a responsibility. 

The emphasis in the above "code" is positive rather than 
negative; it is on a standard of desirable conduct rather than 
on a delineation of prohibited behavior. 

CONTROVERSIAL SUBJECTS 

Haverford College holds that open-minded and free 
inquiry is essential to a student's educational development. 
Thus, the College recognizes the right of all students to engage 
in discussion, to exchange thought and opinion, and to speak 



341 



or write freely on any subject. To be complete, this freedom 
to learn must include the right of inquiry both in and out of 
the classroom and must be free from any arbitrary rules or 
actions that would deny students the freedom to make their 
own choice regarding controversial issues. 

Further, the College endeavors to develop in its students 
the reaUzation that as members of a free society they have not 
only the right but also the obligation to inform themselves 
about various problems and issues, and are free to formulate 
and express their positions on these issues. 

Finally, the College reaffirms the freedom of assembly as 
an essential part of the process of discussion, inquiry and 
advocacy. Students, therefore, have the right to found new, or 
to join existing organizations, on or off campus, which 
advocate and engage in lawful actions to implement their 
announced goals. 

Student actions such as those here involved do not imply 
approval, disapproval, or sponsorship by the College or its 
student body; neither do such actions in any way absolve a 
student from his academic responsibilities. Similarly, students 
are expected to make clear that they are speaking or acting as 
individuals and not for the College or its student body. 

The freedom to learn, to inquire, to speak, to organize 
and to act with conviction within the bounds of law, are held 
by Haverford College to be a cornerstone of education in a 
free society. 

RELATIONSHIP WITH LAW ENFORCEMENT 
AGENCIES 

While the College assumes no responsibility for acting as 
an arm of the law, neither does it knowingly afford its 
students any greater protection from the law than that 
enjoyed by all citizens. In the absence of parents, the College 
does assume an initial responsibility for assuring its students 
equal protection under the law. 

STUDENTS' COUNCIL MEMORANDUM ABOUT 
DRUGS, April 1968 

It is undeniable that there is a serious problem of drug 
abuse on many college campuses. Although Students' Council 
does not agree with the present laws concerning drugs and 
their use, it does recognize a serious problem on the Haverford 
campus, both because of the present legal implications and 
also because of the possible physiological and psychological 
dangers. Moreover, these dangers extend beyond the individual 
or individuals specifically involved: the narcotics laws can 
legally endanger those not inolved, even those oblivious to a 
situation involving use, possession, or distribution of illegal 
drugs. Council strongly urges students to be aware of these 
laws and the risks involved in breaking them. 

The Council is especially concerned because of the 
severity of the penalties for even first offense convictions. 
Federal law states that a first offense conviction for the sale, 
receipt, or transport of narcotics or marijuana carries a penalty 
of 5-20 years imprisonment. First offense penalties under state 
law for use, possession, or distribution of these drugs are 1, 
2-5, and 5-20 years respectively. It should be pointed out that 
while the College does not consider itself an active arm of the 
law, neither will it intercede in any lawful enforcement 
activities. 

The jeopardy in which the entire college community is 
placed by the illegal use of drugs, as well as personal concern 
for other individuals requires that, in any situation where a 
conflict arises in regard to drug abuse, interpersonal 



15 



confrontation, as suggested by the Honor System, be 
employed to resolve the problem. Should this prove 
ineffective, the responsibility for resolution of the conflict 
falls upon the representatives of the college community, as 
indicated by the Honor System and the Code of Student 
Responsibility. 

Illegal drug use may be cause for disciplinary action under 
the Code of Student Responsibility. As the Code states, "The 
nature of any resultant action will be proportional to the 
severity of the dangers to the others." After discussion with 
members of the administration and faculty and with many 
students, Council feels that the following should be the major 
concerns of the community in regard to drug use; 

Drug use itself. Because of the dangers involved in drug 
use, both to the individual and to the community, indiscrete 
use of illegal drugs is subject to disciplinary action. 

Off-campus distribution. Illegal distribution of drugs to 
persons outside the college community is a serious violation of 
the Code of Student Responsibility subject to stringent 
disciplinary measures. 

Counseling services. It is evident from discussion that drug 
abuse in many cases is symptomatic rather than casual in 
nature. Council urges students personally involved in situations 
of drug abuse to seek the services of the college counselors, 
whose records are completely confidential. 

DAMAGES 

Students responsible for damage to College property shall 
report it to the Students' Council treasurer whereupon they 
will be billed only for the actual cost of repairs. If the damage 
is not reported, the Council will undertake to investigate the 
matter thoroughly, and may take action in any of the 
following ways: 

1. If the Council can place responsibility upon individuals 
it will report their names to the comptroller, who will bill 
them for only the damage. 

2. If the Council cannot fix the responsibility upon 
individuals but accepts it as probable that the damage or loss 
was due to students, it may authorize action as follows: 

a) the assessment by the College of a specified group of 
students. 

b) the assessment by the College of the whole student 
body. 

c) in cases of small amounts, the Council itself may pay 
for the damage of loss out of its own funds. 

3. An amount of SI. 00 per student, per semester, is set 
aside in College funds as a reserve for unassignable damages. 

RESIDENCE REQUIREMENTS 

The residential nature of Haverford College is an integral 
part of its educational philosophy. Therefore, students, with 
the exception of those who are married or are living at home, 
are normally expected to live on campus. 

NATURE AND PURPOSE 
OF FIFTH DAY MEETING 

Haverford College was founded by the Religious Society 
of Friends, and for many years students were required to 
attend Friends Meeting on Thursday morning at 10:45. In 



16 



recent years, attendance has been voluntary. No classes or 
other academic appointments may be scheduled for this hour, 
however, and all students are encouraged to take advantage of 
the opportunity to join the College community for silent 
meditation and an occasional spoken message. 

The Meeting represents the spiritual community of the 
College and is an essential part of the life of the College. It is 
non-sectarian in character. It also provides a focus for the 
moral concerns which move the participants, and at intervals 
at the end of a period of meditation, the Meeting will turn to 
discussion of its concerns in a meeting for business. 

All entering freshmen will be given a period of orientation 
to acquaint them with the tradition and character of the 
Meeting, and will be required to attend a certain number of 
Meetings during their first semester. 



MINIMUM LEVELS FOR PROMOTION 

Grading standards at Haverford are as follows: 

1 . The minimum passing grade is 60. No course credit is 
given for a course in which the grade is below 60, though the 
grade will be counted in the student's general average. 
Departmental 100 courses require a minimum grade of 70. 

2. If a student receives a grade lower than 65 in a course 
which is prerequisite for another course, he must, in order to 
take that other course, receive the permission of the 
instructor. (In some cases a grade higher than 65 may be 
required in a prerequisite course.) 

3. The general averages required for promotion are 60 for 
Freshmen, 65 for Sophomores, and 70 for Juniors. The 
average for the Senior year required for graduation is 70. 

4. Grades in courses presented in fulfillment of a major 
program of concentration must be 65 or above. In the case of 
a full-year course the full-year average must be 65 or above. 

5. If a student is permitted by the Associate Dean to 
withdraw from a course for unusual reasons, including those 
beyond the student's control such as illness, the grade is 
recorded as "W" and not included in the student's average. If a 
student drops a course without permission, or is dropped from 
a course, that grade is recorded as "DR" and averaged as 40. 
The lowest grade average for a course which a student 
completes is 45. 

Failed Courses. Normally, a course which is failed has to 
be made up, either: (a) by passing with a C or better, a course 
approved in advance by the Associate Dean, in summer school, 
or (b) by passing an extra course at Haverford. 

In order to graduate, a student must pass 36 semester 
courses. Each student must pass 36 semester courses. Each 
student must take five courses in each of four semesters 
(usually the first four) and four or more courses in each of 
four additional semesters. It was not the intention of the 
faculty, in permitting four 4-course semesters, that they 
should be used primarily for makeups of failures by being 
expanded to 5-course semesters. However, in some 
circumstances, the Committee on Academic Standing may 
permit a student to make up a failure in this way rather than 
by going to summer school. Each student who fails a course 
should discuss with the Associate Dean whether he should go 
to summer school or request permission from the Committee 
on Academic Standing to make up the failure with an extra 
course at Haverford. 

Students who have failed courses should not expect to 
make them up during the Senior year. Although, as mentioned 
above, the Committee on Academic Standing deals with each 



case individually, a general rule is that a student who has failed 
one or more courses should have at least 28 course credits 
before beginning the Senior year. 

Dropped Courses. Although students may choose, within 
limits, in which semesters they will take only four courses, 
they may not change their minds once the semester is well 
under way. After the first four weeks of a semester no course 
for which a student has registered may be dropped without 
penalty, the penalty being a grade of "DR" for the dropped 
course, this grade being averaged as 40. This rule applies 
whether or not the course is needed. For example, a second 
semester senior with 32 credits may not sign up for five 
courses and then drop one (after the first four weeks) without 
penalty. If the drop is for reasons beyond the student's 
control, such as illness, the penalty is not applied; the grade is 
"W," withdrawn, and the average is based on the remaining 
courses. 

Grading Procedures. The academic unit at Haverford is the 
semester course. For the first two years (Freshman and 
Sophomore) the official transcript will contain only a list of 
courses a student has taken without grades. A notation will be 
made if a student fails, drops, or withdraws from a course. 
This will go into effect beginning with the Class of 1971, but 
will not apply to students in earlier classes. 

Numerical grades will be given and grade reports will be 
sent to the student, to his adviser, and to the Associate Dean. 

In the Junior and Senior years a student may choose to 
take one course outside his major division each semester for 
which no grade will be recorded. The grade for this course will 
appear on the grade report sent the student, but will not be 
entered on the transcript. Again the transcript will record a 
failure, drop, or withdrawal. 

To avail himself of this option, a student should ijndicate 
at the time of registration that he is taking the course without 
a recorded grade. No changes in this option can be made after 
the first four weeks of classes. 

In some advanced courses. Senior research and 
departmental studies, a written evaluation will be given in 
place of a numerical grade. In such courses, the transcript will 
indicate that a written evaluation accompanies the transcript 
and a note made if the course was failed. 

Attendance at Classes. Students are expected to attend all 
of their classes. When absences are necessary they should be 
explained to the satisfaction of the instructor, preferably in 
advance. The responsibility for making up work missed rests 
with the student. 

Policies with respect to unexcused absences will vary from 
one class to another. Should a student's attendance in any 
course be unsatisfactory, his instructor may send him a written 
notice, a copy of which goes to the Associate Dean, stating 
that in effect any further unexcused absence will result in his 
being dropped from the course. 

A student whose performance suffers as a result of 
chronic absenteeism may be put on probation by the Associate 
Dean. Specific terms of the probation will be spelled out in 
each letter, copies of which are sent to the student's 
instructors. Normally this probation will mean that an 
unexcused absence from any class during the period specified 
may result in the student's being dropped from that course. 

Attendance at Collection. All students are required to 
attend Collection each Tuesday in Roberts Hall at 10:40 a.m. 
Two cuts are allowed each semester. 



Term Paper Deadlines. No paper may be accepted for 
credit by any member of the faculty after 12:00 noon on 
Saturday, December 21, (for the first semester) or 12:00 noon 
on Saturday, May 10 (for the second semester). If the 
instructor sets a date earlier than this, the papers are du^ then, 
and he may penalize late papers at his discretion. 

If a paper is assigned in place of the final examination, the 
date by which it is due is set by the instructor, but it may not 
be later than 4:00 p.m., Wednesday, January 15 (first 
semester) and 4:00 p.m. on Thursday, May 20 (second 
semester). 

The maximum grade for a late paper will be one half the 
grade it would have received had it been on time. If such a 
paper represents the entire grade for the course, the maximum 
grade is 60, or, in a course required for the major, 65. 

Any student who anticipates that he will not be able to 
meet a deadline should go to the Associate Dean, who, if he 
believes the case warrants it, will give the student a note to 
take to the instructor, authorizing him, if he sees fit, to grant 
an extension, and suggesting the terms on which it may be 
granted. 

Major Field of Study. Toward the end of his Sophomore 
year, each student is required to select his major field of study. 
Students should consult with their advisors, and may also wish 
to consult with the Associate Dean or with other faculty mem- 
bers, students, and administration. 

The deadline for selection of a major is 4:00 p.m. on 
Friday, April 1 1 th, before which time the student must file his 
major selection with the Associate Dean of the College. Failure 
to meet the deadline entails a charge of $1.00 per day of 
lateness. 

Committee on Academic Standing. The Committee on 
Academic Standing is a standing committee of the faculty 
responsible for reviewing periodically the records of all 
students whose work is unsatisfactory. The members of the 
committee are Mr. MacKay, Chairman, and Messrs. Butman, 
Davidon, Hare, and Potter. The committee meets regularly 
when deficiencies are reported and semester grades are given. 
It has the authority to drop students from the College or to 
prescribe certain conditions for continuing or additional work. 

Should a student's record warrant his being dropped from 
the College or required to take a leave of absence, the decision 
of the committee will be postponed to a second meeting which 
will be held within five days of the first, and the student and 
his adviser will be notified that such action is possible. The 
student will be invited to appear before the committee if he 
wishes to do so, and his adviser, or another faculty member 
who knows him well may be invited to be present as well. If 
the student does not appear, the committee will make a 
decision in his absence and inform him of it in writing. 

Decisions of the Committee on Academic Standing may 
be appealed to the President of the College. 

Academic Flexibility. The Academic Flexibility 
Committee is authorized to grant an exception to the 
academic regulations, especially for a strong student, where 
this will make it possible for him to achieve academic goals 
which otherwise might be difficult. 

Some samples of the kinds of exceptions which this 
Committee might grant are given in the current college catalog. 
Interested students are invited to submit proposals in writing 
to Dean Potter, who is the executive secretary of the 
committee. Students are welcome to consult with him or with 
other members of the committee before submitting a proposal. 

Students should note that this committee deals largely 



17 



with exceptions arising from academic excellence; academic 
troubles are the responsibility of the Committee on Academic 
Standing. 

MOTOR VEHICLE REGULATIONS 

All students wishing to possess or operate a car, 
motorcycle or other motor vehicle while at College must 
register the vehicle with the College. This rule may not be 
circumvented by storing a car off campus. Any student may 
register a car with the exception of resident, first-semester 
Freshmen and resident, second-semester Freshmen whose 
average is below 85. 

Registration Procedure. A student should register his 
vehicle with the Buildings and Grounds Department. The 
registration fee is $10 per year, or $6 for one semester. There 
is no additional charge if a student changes cars during the 
year, but the change must be reported. 

At the time of registration the student must present proof 
of ownership and the name of the insurance company and the 
number of the policy under which he has hability insurance. A 
temporary permit will be issued in cases where insurance or 
other information is incomplete. 

The deadline for registering cars brought on campus at the 
beginning of the college year is 4:00 p.m., Friday, September 
20. Cars brought on campus later must be registered within 
one day of arrival. 

Temporary Registration. A student may have a car here 
for two or three days if he obtains permission from the Dean 
of Students and secures a temporary registration permit from 
the Buildings and Grounds Department. 

Parking. Student parking is permitted only in the Field 
House lot, from 3:00 to 5:00 p.m. Monday through Friday. 
After that time and on weekends, students may also park on 
Walton Road, Hall Drive, and West of Jones Hall. Vehicles may 
not be parked in such a way as to occupy two parking spaces. 
It is forbidden to park, or temporarily stop a car on any 
campus road. 

The responsibihty for finding a legal parking space rests 
with the automobile owner. Lack of space is not considered a 
vahd excuse for violation of regulations, just as there is no 
valid excuse for parking in an improper space. 

Where special circumstances require parking in an 
improper space, permission should be sought in advance with 
the Buildings and Grounds Supervisor, Mr. Bogart. 

Disabled cars are not allowed on the campus and extensive 
repairs are not to be carried out on the premises. Students 
with cars rendered immobile because of mechanical failure 
should immediately contact the foreman of the grounds, Mr. 
Porreca, who will assist in either starting the car or in moving 
it to an appropriate location. 

Display of Decal. The registration decal must be affixed to 
the left side of the rear bumper so that it is entirely visible. 
Decals which become defective or defaced will be replaced 
without charge. Decals are not transferable from one vehicle to 
another, and must be removed in cases of change of ownership 
of the vehicle. Decals from previous years may not be 
displayed. 

Driving Habits and Speed The speed limit on the campus 
is 15 miles per hour. Vehicles must be fully muffied and driven 
in a manner in which there is no noise disturbance. Vehicles 



are allowed on regular campus roads only. 

Enforcement and Fines. The person in whose name a 
vehicle is registered is responsible for any violations placed on 
it. Violation notices and resulting fines are forwarded by mail, 
and if possible, by notice left in the car or on the windshield. 
There is no provision for warnings. 

A student wishing to appeal a traffic fine should appeal to 
the Dean of Students. Appeals must be made within three 
working days following the violation, and cannot be 
considered thereafter. 

Violations of these regulations are subject to fines as 
follows: 

Failure to register a vehicle ' $1 5.00 

Speeding or reckless driving 10.00 

Driving or parking on lawn 5.00 

All other violations 2.00 

Income from fines is deposited to a scholarship fund. 

After being issued three tickets for violations in any one 
academic year for illegal parking, a further violation may result 
in the vehicle being towed away to the Field House lot at the 
owner's expense ($20) without prior notice of warning. 

A student may be denied the privilege of having a motor 
vehicle on campus when he receives five violations within one 
academic year. Driving while intoxicated will result in 
automatic loss of driving privileges. 



REGISTRATION OF CAMPUS EVENTS 

All campus events, other than regularly scheduled 
academic functions and intercollegiate athletics, must be 
registered and approved at least 10 days in advance in the 
Office of the Dean of Students. 

This policy includes social events, mixers, lectures, 
concerts, and other College and student-sponsored events. 

SELLING, SOLICITING, PEDDLING 

Generally the privilege of selling on campus is reserved for 
students. The Students' Council annually awards concessions 
to deserving students. In those cases where a student sales 
representative cannot be found, outside firms must have 
written permission from the Dean of Students in order to sell 
on the campus. 

The presence of unauthorized persons anywhere on the 
premises should be reported promptly to a member of the 
Students' Council or the Dean of Students. 

USE OF THE COLLEGE'S NAME 

No student organization or individual student may enter 
into any contractual agreement using the name of cife 
organization or of the College without prior approval by the 
College through the Office of the Dean of Students. 

GAMBLING 

Gambling of any type is prohibited at Haverford College. 

CHANGE OF HOME ADDRESS 

It is important that each student keep the College 
informed of his home address. Any changes in a student's 
home address during a semester should be transmitted to the 
Registrar. 



18 



Advice To Freshmen: 

Be on the lookout for the best things of college. You will 
find there what you ought to be looking for. 

Do not rashly criticize or disobey a college custom, even if 
you do not like it. Fortunately, there is none which will cause 
you to violate your Christian conscience. 

Remember that college is primarily intended for study. You 
will get more pleasure from it if you work faithfully on your 
college courses. 

Come out for at least one college activity in each quarter of 
Freshrrtan year, whether literary, musical, or athletic. Do not 
hold back because you know nothing about a particular sport or 
activity. You will have four years to learn it. If you do not try 
out in Freshman year, however, you may never get another op- 
portunity. 

Do not make yourself conspicuous. You will get what you 
deserve by Senior year. 

Remember that you, just as much as those who have been 
here longer, represent the college to outsiders, and be careful to 
maintain her good name. 
Freshman Commandments: 

Thou shalt show respect towards upper classmen, yielding 
the walks to them at all times; Thou shalt rise when a member of 
any other class enters the room. 

Thou shalt wear no Prep School insignia, or loud or offensive 
clothing. 

Thou shalt wear no beard or mustache. 

Thou shalt stay back of the stairs at the entrance of the 
dining-room, and wait until the Sophomores have entered. 

Thou shalt not walk on the grass, or whistle, or call across 
the campus, and thou shalt keep thy hands out of thy pockets. 

Thou shalt answer the telephone promptly. If an upper class- 
man is wanted, thou shalt not call through the halls until thou 
hast found him to be absent from his room. Then thou shalt do 
so. 

Thou shalt solemnly skip to and from classes during the first 
week. 

Thou shalt always have thy galoshes fully buckled. 
-From the HAVERFORD COLLEGE HANDBOOK, 1922-23 



IV. Athletics 

"For a living 

dog is better than a dead lion. " 

-Ecclesiastes 9:4 




PHYSICAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 

Each student is required to take eight terms of 
Non-Academic courses (Fall, Winter, Spring) with a minimum 
of five terms in Physical Education. 

Freshmen are required to take Non-Academic work all 
three terms. At least two terms of Physical Education are 
required and Physical Education must be taken in the Fall 
term of the Freshman year. Freshmen who demonstrate 
satisfactory progress in the Fall term may petition the 



341 



Non-Academic Programs Committee for permission to take a 
course from the Arts and Service Program in one of the 
remaining terms. Sophomores and Juniors are required to take 
two terms of Non-Academic work, at least one of which is in 
Physical Education. The student may schedule the appropriate 
remaining required term in the Sophomore, Junior or Senior 
year. A student who receives a "U" in any term must then 
take appropriate Non-Academic courses every term until he is 
caught up in his requirements. All eight terms may be selected 
in Physical Education. 



SWIMMING TESTS 

Students must also take a swimming test upon entering 
the College. Those who fail to pass the swimming test will be 
scheduled for swimming instruction during the early fall and 
late spring. This test must be passed before graduation. 

INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS 

Intercollegiate athletic schedules are arranged in football, 
soccer, cross country, basketball, wrestling, fencing, 
swimming, baseball, track, tennis, golf, sailing and cricket. 
Junior varsity schedules are arranged in soccer, basketball, 
wrestling, track, fencing, baseball and tennis. These activities 
coupled with an extensive intramural program make it possible 
for a large majority of students to engage in some form of 
competitive athletics. 

INTERCOLLEGIATE ELIGIBILITY 

The eligibility roles are those of the National Collegiate 
Athletic Association and the Eastern Collegiate Athletic 
Conference. Copies are on file in the Athletic Office. 

Haverford allows four years participation in all varsity 
sports. A student may not compete in more than one sport at 
one time. 

ATHLETIC AWARDS 

Members of varsity squads who successfully complete 
minimum requirements as established by the department are 
eligible to receive a varsity letter and sweater the first time a 
letter is won. Class numerals are awarded to both varsity and 
junior varsity squad members. 



VARSITY TEAM CAPTAINS 1968-1969 



Football 

Soccer 

Cross Country 

Basketball 

Wrestling 

Fencing 
Swimming 

Baseball 
Track 



Edward M. Sleeper '69 

William H. Bickley '69 

Stanley A. Jarocki '69 

Eric O. Smith '69 

Stephen M. Rolfe '69 

Robert S. White '69 

Stanley A. Jarocki '69 

Kenneth C. Edgar '69 

Timothy B. Golding '69 

Douglas R. Ross '69 

Richard Pappas '69 

Michael F. Briselli '70 

David M. Rothstein '70 

Stanley A. Jarocki '69 

Stephen M. Rolfe '69 

Robert S. White '69 



19 



Tennis 
Golf 
Cricket 
Sailing 



France H. Conroy '70 

Peter K. Coleman '70 

Alexis Swan '70 

Martin Fuller '70 



INTRAMURAL ATHLETICS 

The fall program of the Physical Education Department 
consists of tennis instruction, the regular physical education 
class in which touch football and soccer are taught, plus an 
intramural program of touch football and soccer. 

The winter program consists of instruction in basketball, 
volleyball, handball, and badminton. This program is 
supplemented by intramurals in the same activities. 

The spring program offers instruction in Softball, tennis, 
and golf. The tennis course meets daily, with Monday lectures 
and instruction on the courts the other two days. Golf 
instruction is scheduled two days per week with a third day 
elected for practice or play. The softball instruction is 
scheduled Monday, Wednesday, and Friday. This program is 
also supplemented by intramural softball and tennis. 



REGISTRATION SCHEDULE: 

Fall Program 

Freshmen: 
Upperclassmen: 



Classes begin: 
Classes stop: 



Thursday, Sept. 10, 7:30 p.m. 
Monday, Sept. 16, 9:30 a.m. 
to 4 p.m.. Registrars Office 
Wednesday, September 18 
Friday, November 22 



Winter Program 



Freshmen: 
Upperclassmen: 

Classes begin: 
Classes stop: 



Spring Program 



Freshmen: 
Upperclassmen: 

Classes begin: 
Classes stop: 



Monday, November 25 - Gym - 4:30 
Monday, November 25 - Registrars 
Office, 9:30-4:30 
Monday, December 2 
Friday, February 28 



Monday, March 3 - 4:30 - Gym 
Monday, March 3, 9:30 - 4:30 - 
Registrars Office 
Monday, March 10 
Friday, May 9 



REQUIREMENTS FOR PHYSICAL 
EDUCATION CLASSES 

Attendance. All students are required to attend physical 
education classes three times per week. Two unexcused cuts 
are allowed during the fall and spring seasons and three during 
the winter season. Excessive cuts will result in automatic 
failure in physical education. 

Grades. Grades are based almost wholly on attendance 
and attitude with little emphasis placed on ability. Grades are 
Excellent, Satisfactory, and Unsatisfactory. Failure in a 
physical education course will entail a charge of $5.00 and the 
course will have to be made up in the senior year. 

Apparel. A complete athletic uniform of sweatshirt, T 



shirts, sweatsox, red shorts and gym shoes must be worn at all 
physical education classes. This uniform can be purchased at 
the time of fall registration for freshmen, or during the year 
from the stock room in the basement of the gymnasium. 

REGISTRATION REQUIREMENTS 

Varsity Athletes. Students may substitute work on varsity 
and junior varsity squads for the physical education 
requirements, and are responsible directly to the coaches for 
their attendance. Men who drop or are dropped from these 
squads must report to the Physical Education Office to 
register. Men taking varsity or junior varsity athletics for 
physical education credit must register according to the regular 
schedule. 

Late Registration. Students who register after the 
scheduled dates will be subject to the late registration charge 
of $2.00. 

Medical Excuse. Men whose physical condition prevents 
them from participation in athletics should see the Director of 
Physical Education to arrange some method of meeting the 
requirements. These men will be allowed to work as 
intercollegiate sports managers or to take extra work in the 
non-academic field. 



V. A Guide To 
The Haverford Library 

"The massive 

step by which you ascend to 

the threshold is a trifle 

crooked . . . You look up 

and down the 

miniature cloister before you 

pass in; it seems wonderfully old 

and queer. Then you turn 

into the drawing-room, where 

you find modem conversation 

and late publications and the 

prospect of dinner. The new life 

and the old 

have melted together; there 

is no dividing-line. " 

-Henry James 




20 



HAVERFORD COLLEGE LIBRARY 

The library at Haverford College consists of two main 
parts: the Thomas Wistar Brown Library, portions of which 
date from 1863; and the James P. Magill Library, completed in 
1968. When the Magill Library was built, extensive alterations 
and improvements also were made to the older structure. 

The Library has some 73,000 sq. ft. of floor space. Its 
shelves will hold a half-million volumes, and it can seat 500 
persons. Air and humidity are controlled throughout the 
building. Rare books and manuscripts are guarded in a 
fireproof vault protected by a carbon-dioxide 
fire-extinguishing system. There are 260 carrels. Thirty-one are 
enclosed and reserved for faculty use, and 24 are reserved for 
students who wish to use typewriters. The original north wing 
of the Library building was renovated in 1952 and named the 
Philips Wing in honor of one of the college's principal 
benefactors, William Pyle Philips, a member of the Class of 
1902. 

The Magill Library has five levels: basement, 1st tier, 2nd 
tier (where circulation desk, catalog, periodicals room, 
reference section, and main reading room are), 3rd tier, 4th 
tier and (on older or north side of the building only) 5th tier. 
Maps of the various areas are installed near the stairways on 
each tier. These maps show the location of books and special 
rooms. If at any time you need information about these 
matters, do not hesitate to inquire at the circulation desk or 
reference desk. Staff members will be glad to help you. 

WHO MAY USE THE LIBRARY 

This is a private library provided for the use of the 
faculty, students, and other members of the Haverford 
academic community. It is not open to the general pubhc. 
Exceptions to this rule are always made for alumni, members 
of the Library Associates, and occasionally for other adult 
readers who need books or periodicals which they cannot 
easily obtain in public or institutional libraries in the vicinity. 
Such persons should present suitable identification. The 
materials they wish to borrow must be ones not currently 
needed, or likely to be needed by students or faculty. 

Special rules govern applications for use of the Library by 
pupils of secondary schools. Because of the number of such 
schools, limitations of space in the Library building, and 
demand for books by members of the College, these rules are 
strictly enforced. 

No high school or preparatory school student is permitted 
to consult the book collections without specific, written, 
advance permission from the Librarian of Haverford College, 
who requires either: 

A. A written recommendation of the student by a 
member of the Haverford College faculty or 
administration. 

B. A statement of the high school's or preparatory 
school's willingness to take full responsibility for its 
student's good conduct and proper usage of Haverford 
College Library books and privileges. The school's 
willingness in this regard must be conveyed in a written 
note addressed by the principal (not a teacher or 
school librarian) to the Haverford Librarian. 

Secondary school students registered here are expected to 
complete their work in this Library by 6 p.m. They may 
borrow not more than 3 books at a time for a period of one 
week only and are not allowed to use any of the departmental 
libraries. 

Registered students from other colleges, and all secondary 



21 



school students granted permission to use the Library, will be 
given cards which they must present at the circulation desk 
when they wish to withdraw books. Such cards are not 
transferable and are subject to recall at any time. 

LIBRARY HOURS 

Main Library 8 a.m. to 12 midnight, Monday— Saturday; 1 
p.m. to 1 2 midnight on Sunday. 

The Treasure Room is open 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. and 
1:30 p.m. to 5 p.m., Monday— Friday; 9 a.m. to 12:30 
p.m. and 1 p.m. to 5 p.m., Saturday: 1 p.m. to 5 p.m., 
Sunday. Rare books and manuscripts are not available on 
Saturday or Sunday except by special arrangement. 

Departmental Libraries 

Stokes (Mathematics, Physics, Chemistry) 8 a.m. 

to 12 midnight, Monday-Friday; 8 a.m. 

to 6 p.m., Saturday; 1 p.m. to 12 

midnight, Sunday. 
Sharpless (Psychology periodicals, 3rd fl.; Biology 

1st fl.) 8 a.m. to 11 p.m., 

Monday— Saturday; 2 p.m. to 1 1 p.m., 

Sunday. 
Hilles (Engineering) 8 a.m. to 10 p.m., 

Monday— Saturday; closed on Sunday. 
Drinker (Music) 8 a.m. to 11 p.m., 

Monday-Saturday; 2 p.m. to 11 p.m., 

Sunday. 
Observatory Open by appointment only. 

ALPHABETICAL LOCATION GUIDE 
TO BOOKS BY CALL NUMBER 

A — BT Basement 

BV - BX (except Quaker) 1st tier 

BX 7600-BX 7799 (Quaker) . . 2nd tier (Treasure Room) 

C-G 1st tier 

H-HG 3rd tier 

HG-*M 4th tier 

N 1st tier 

P-PQ 4th tier 

PR 2nd tier (S. and N. Wings) 

PS 2nd tier (North Wing) 

PT 5th tier 

Fiction 3rd tier 

**Q , See note 

R-Z 5th tier 

289-299 4th tier 

699-773 4th tier 

Government and International 

Documents Basement 

Reference 2nd tier 

Current periodicals and 

newspapers 2nd tier 

Matzke Collection 4th tier (after PQ) 

Ruskin Collection 2nd tier (after PR 5263) 

*A few M books are kept in the main library; most are in 
Drinker Hall. 

**Location of Q (Science) books is determined by the 
caption above the call number. Q books kept in the main 
library have "Main Library" above the call number on catalog 
card. These books are on the 5th tier. Biology laboratory Q 
books are in Sharpless; Observatory Q books are in the 



341 



Observatory; Engineering Q books are in Hilles; all other Q 
books are in Stokes Library. 

SPECIAL ROOMS AND WORK AREAS 

Gummere-Morley Room (1st tier), a browsing room 
commemorating Professors F. B. Gummere and Frank Morley, 
Sr. (Smoking permitted) 

Microforms Rooms (2nd tier), equipped with microfilms, 
microfiche, microcards and readers. Open 9 a.m. to 10:15 
p.m., Monday-Friday; Saturday, 9 a.m. to 1 2 noon. 

Rufus M. Jones Study (2nd tier), a replica of Rufus Jones' 
study, with some of his books and furniture. 

The Treasure Room (2nd tier) contains part of the Quaker 
Collection. Staff offices and research facilities for visiting 
scholars are provided in the Treasure Room, Borton Wing, and 
Harvey Room. 

The Borton Room (2nd tier), named for Hugh Borton, 
Class of 1926, former president of Haverford College, adjoins 
the Treasure Room. Above the Borton Room is the Harvey 
Peace Research Room, below it the vault for rare books and 
manuscripts. 

The Treasure Room, Borton Wing, and Harvey Room are 
not undergraduate reading areas. 

The Christopher Morely Alcove (2nd tier), at the east end 
of the building, serves as a browsing area and will contain 
exhibits and collections of Christopher Morley's writings. 

The Sharpless Room(2nd tier), named in honor of Isaac 
Sharpless, president of Haverford College, 1887-1917, and 
furnished by the Class of 191 7, is a public gallery where many 
of the college's paintings are hung. 

The Hires Room (1st tier), named for Harrison Hires, 
Class of 1910, and Mrs. Hires, is an audio room where discs 
and tapes can be heard. This room is planned to be used 
primarily for listening to recordings of the spoken word. Hours 
are posted. 

The Strawbridge Seminar Room (1st tier) is used for 
seminars and committee meetings. (Smoking permitted) 

The C.C. Morris Cricket Library and Collection (2nd tier, 
off North Wing), named in honor of an internationally famous 
cricketer and a member of the Class of 1904, houses material 
illustrating the history of American cricket with special 
emphasis on the sport at Haverford College and in the 
Philadelphia area. This room is not open for general 
undergraduate use. 

The Crawford Mezzanine (2nd tier) in the South Wing 
provides writing and study tables for forty-four students. It is 
named for Alfred R. Crawford, Class of 1931, vice-president of 
Haverford College, 1964-1966. 

There is a reading area at the end of the South Wing (2nd 
tier), the gift of the Class of 1942, with additional study tables 
and easy chairs; also a lounge area on the 4th tier near the 
elevator. 

CARD CATALOG 

To ascertain whether a book is owned by the Library, 
look in the Card Catalog under the author's name, the title of 
the book, or the name of the editor or translator of the'book. 
When works on a certain subject, rather than a specific book, 
are wanted, these can be found by looking in the catalog under 
the appropriate subject heading, i.e., a German-English 
dictionary could be found under the heading 
"GERMAN-LANGUAGE-DICTIONARIES- ENGLISH." 

In order to find the book in the stacks after deciding, by 



FLOOR PLANS 




J Tiii_ 9=' JP Uj^^TOTT^TO 



fliMMIi 




BASEMENT 



22 





L 




lllll 



I 

J 



TIER 



consulting the catalog, which book or books will be useful, it 
is necessary to note (in writing!) (1) the call number (including 
any caption above the number), which will be found in the 
upper left corner of the catalog card and (2) the accession 
number, which will be found just below the call number. The 
call number (example: HC102.5.A2 H7) tells where in the 
Library the book is shelved. (See alphabetical location guide 
above.) The accession number (example: 223416) is used 
when charging the book at the circulation desk in order to 
take it out. If the book wanted is not found in its place on the 
stack shelves, the accession number should be given to the 
attendant at the circulation desk, who will be able to tell 
whether the book has been previously charged out of the 
Library and when it is due, or whether it is on reserve, being 
mended, at the bindery, or missing in inventory. 

A green slip in the Card Catalog identifies a book that has 
been received but is still being processed. 

Special locations for books (e.g., Matzke Collection, 
Gummere-Morley Room, Music Library, Biology or some 
other laboratory) are indicated on the catalog cards by 
captions printed over the call numbers. In these cases, the 
book will be found not in the same area of the main library as 
other books with the same classification but in the particular 
room of the Library or in the other building mentioned. An 
asterisk (*) beside a call number indicates that the book is 
oversized; if the book is not in its normal place on the shelf, it 
is shelved on the bottom shelf in the same section of the stack. 

Books are not to be put back on the shelf by the reader. 
They should be left on the nearest table. 

The Haverford Card Catalog includes author cards for all 
books added to the Bryn Mawr College Library since 1947. It 
also contains full entry (author, subject, title) cards for 
Russian holdings at Bryn MawT and Swarthmore. 



NEWSPAPERS AND PERIODICALS 

The Library receives several daily English-language 
newspapers as well as a number of daily and weekly foreign 
papers. These are kept in the Periodicals Room on the main 
floor (2nd tier). The New York Times, Philadelphia Inquirer, 
Christian Science Monitor, Wall Street Journal, London Times 
and Washington Post are received daily and the Philadelphia 
Sunday Bulletin is also taken. Foreign weeklies received 
include The German Tribune (in English), London Times 
Literary Supplement and Manchester Guardian Weekly. All 
newspapers are kept for at least one month before being 
discarded. 

The New York Times is available on microfilm back to 
1851 (with some years lacking), the current microfilms being 
received about two weeks later than the paper. The films and 
microfilm readers are in the Microforms Room (2nd tier) and 
the New York Times Index is shelved nearby in the Reference 
area. The Library also has films of the Philadelphia Public 
Ledger from 1836 through 1929. Back numbers of other 
Philadelphia newspapers are available on film at the Free 
Library of Philadelphia. 

Foreign-language newspapers received by the Library 
include: L 'Express (Paris), Literaturnaia Gazeta (Moscow), Le 
Monde (Paris), Pravda (Moscow), and Die Zeit (Hamburg; the 
edition received is printed in New York). 

Most current periodicals not sent to departmental libraries 
are kept alphabetically by title in the Periodicals Room. These 
issues may not be removed from this area. The Reader's Guide 
and Social Sciences and Humanities Index are also kept in this 
room. 



23 



341 



Quaker periodicals are kept in tiie Treasure Room. 

An alphabetical file of titles and call numbers of all 
periodicals received currently will be found on the New Book 
shelves. In the drawers marked "Periodicals" in the Card 
Catalog is an alphabetical file of titles of all periodicals 
received currently. (Periodicals which the Library no longer 
receives or which have been discontinued are listed 
alphabetically elsewhere in the Card Catalog.) Each card shows 
the library's exact holdings and gives the accession number of 
each bound volume. 

An alphabetical file of all scientific periodicals at 
Haverford, Bryn Mawr, and Swarthmore College libraries is 
kept on the New Book shelves in the main Library as well as in 
the library at Stokes. 

Bound periodicals may be charged out only by members 
of the Haverford faculty. Current issues may not be charged 
out by anyone. 

The Union List of Serials and New Serial Titles are useful 
in verifying information about periodicals and in locating 
those not available at Haverford. These are kept in the Catalog 
Room. 

DEPARTMENTAL LIBRARIES 

Use of these departmental libraries is restricted to 
Haverford and Beyn Mawr College faculty and students. 
Anybody else wishing to borrow a book from a departmental 
library must apply to the circulation desk in the main library 
and use the book there. If he is not a member of the College, 
he should request the book 24 hours in advance of the time it 
is needed. 

Bound volumes of periodicals may be charged out of a 
departmental library only by a member of the faculty and 
only for use within the building where the departmental 
library is located (or for use at the secretarial office for 
copying purposes). Current issues may not be charged out. 

With the exceptions noted above, rules governing the use 
of departmental libraries are the same as those applicable to 
the main library. 

Carrels in the Stokes Science Library and the Biology 
departmental library in Sharpless are assigned on a seniority 
basis to science majors. Books charged for use in carrels may 
not be taken from the library rooms. 

Smoking is not permitted in any departmental library. 

All science libraries are administered by the Stokes Hall 
Librarian, whose office is adjacent to the Stokes Library. Any 
questions regarding them should be addressed to her. 

To borrow a scientific publication through Interlibrary 
Loan, see or call the Stokes Hall Librarian (Extension 271 ). 



BOOKS ON RESERVE 

Reserve books may be borrowed for two hours only, 
unless an instructor has specified a longer period. They must 
be used in the Library building. If they are not returned on 
time the borrower will be fined. If nobody else needs the 
books, however, they may be borrowed for another hour. 

Reserve books taken out overnight are due back at 9:45 
a.m., and the borrower will be fined if they are not returned 
promptly. 



CIRCULATION DEPARTMENT 

All books to be taken out of the Library building must be 



charged at the circulation desk. Use the manilla cards (bearing 
numbered tabs) found there. The accession number, found at 
the bottom of the bookplate, should be written in the upper 
left corner of the card; then the borrower's name and campus 
address. Finally the name of the author and title of the book 
borrowed should be added. 

The loan period is one month, except for current fiction, 
which may be recalled within two weeks. The desk attendant 
will stamp the due-date in the front of each book charged. 
There is always at least one attendant on duty at the desk. If 
the attendant is busy in the Reserve Room, borrowers are 
requested to ring the bell and wait for the attendant to check 
out their books. 

Books may be renewed once for one-month period after 
the initial loan period has expired. 

A book in circulation may be reserved by giving the desk 
attendant the accession number of the book and asking to 
have it held. The person requesting the book will be notified 
when the book has been returned. 

To return a book which has been charged out, simply 
place it in the slot at the circulation desk. When the Library is 
closed, the book slot at the entrance is to be used for the 
return of books. 

"Overdue" notices are sent twice a month, on the 1st and 
16th. Thus an overdue notice may be received from one day to 
two weeks after the book is overdue. An overdue notice is 
merely a reminder; it does not relieve the borrower of 
responsibility for knowing when a book is due and for 
returning it on time. Also, the borrower is responsible in these 
matters whether or not the due-date has been stamped in the 

Books kept in carrels must be charged at the circulation 
desk on green cards labelled for carrel use, carrel number to be 
given instead of campus address. A long green slip with space 
for carrel number at the top is to be placed in each book. Any 
book without this slip will be removed from the carrel. 



INTERLIBRARY LOAN AND USE 
OF OTHER LIBRARIES 



When there is a real need for a book now owned by the 
Haverford Library, apply at the circulation desk for an 
interlibrary loan form; if the work desired is one on a scientific 
subject, however, apply to the Science Librarian in Stokes. 
The Librarian will in most cases be able to borrow the book 
from another library for use under the terms and time limit 
stated by the lending library. 

Haverford College students are permitted to use the Bryn 
Mawr College Library and the Swarthmore College Library, 
but before doing so they must obtain from the Haverford 
Reference Librarian a card identifying them as Haverford 
students. They must carry such a card with them. The 
University of Pennsylvania requires a new card each month. 
When using the library of another college, Haverford students 
are expected to acquaint themselves with the regulations of 
that library and abide by them strictly. 



REFERENCE DESK 

This is at the west end of the reference area. The staff 
member at this desk will help you with bibliographical 
problems. Do not hesitate to ask her (or the attendant at the 
circulation desk) for help. 



24 



NEW BOOKS 

New books are put on display every Thursday in the book 
cases in front of the circulation desk. These books may be 
reserved for the following Monday and ay be picked up at 
the circulation desk after 2 p.m. New books on science are 
sent directly to the appropriate departmental libraries after 
being on the display shelves in the main library from Thursday 
until Monday. They may not be reserved. 

A monthly list of accessions by the Haverford and 
Swarthmore libraries is deposited on the New Books shelves in 
front of the circulation desk. 

CARRELS 

Student carrels are located on all tiers except the 5th. To 
reserve a carrel, inquire at the circulation desk. Typing carrels 
are on the 1st and 4th tiers (old stacks). Lockers where 
typewriters may be kept are on the 1st tier. To obtain the 
combination of one of these lockers, inquire at the circulation 
desk. 

Enclosed carrels on the 1st and 4th tiers are reserved for 
faculty. 

TELEPHONES 

Two pay phones are available on the 1st tier, near the 
front stair door. 

PHOTOCOPYING 

A coin-operated machine has been installed in the space 
opposite the front stair door on the 1st tier (new stacks). The 
cost is 10 cents a page. 



LIBRARY RULES 

The construction of the Magill Library and renovation of 
the older structure were made possible by the generosity of 
many Haverford graduates and friends. Users of the building 
are expected to treat the furnishings and equipment with 
zppropriate care. We want to make this building and the 
Library services as convenient and efficient as possible. In turn 
we require that readers observe some simple rules which are 
necessary to assure proper maintenance, safety, and comfort. 
Smoking. Permitted only in the Strawbridge Seminar Room 

and Gummere-Morley Room, on the 1st tier. 
Food and drink. Do not bring food or drinks into the 

building. 
Posters. Not allowed 
Coats and umbrellas. These should be left in the racks and 

umbrella stands provided. 
Doors and windows must be propped open. 
Typing. Carrels where typewriters may be used are located 
on the south side of the old stacks, 1st and 4th 
tiers. 

Fines. A fine of three cents a day per book is 
charged for books returned late to the circulation 
desk. 

The Library reserves the right to call in any book 
at any time, even before it is due. 
A fine of twenty-five cents a day is charged for 
books not returned promptly in response to an 
"emergency recall." 

A special schedule of fines applying to reserve 
books overdue is posted on the library buUeting 
board near the Reserve desk. 



All student fines remaining unpaid at the end of 
November and at the end of the second semester 
will be doubled and charged against the student's 
account. 

Section 426 of the Library Code (Act of June 14, 
1961, P.O. 324; 24 P.S. 4101 et seq.) of the 
Commonwealth of Pennsylvania provides 
substantial penalties for failure to return books to 
libraries of any educational institution chartered 
by the Commonwealth if the institution has given 
thirty days' notice in writing that the books are 
due. 
Lost books. These should be reported immediately. From 
the date of their being reported lost, no more 
overdue fines will accumulate. The borrower is 
responsible however for payment of the cost of 
the book and processing it. (If one volume of a set 
is lost and cannot be replaced, the whole set must 
be paid for.) 



VI. Residence Halls 
And Food Services 

" 'Where's your Strength thru Joy?' 
'Joy din't show up . . .' " 

-Walt Kelly, Instant Pogo 



OCCUPANCY 
SCHEDULES 

Rooms may be occupied 
from 1 :00 p.m. on 
Saturday, September 14th, 
and must be relinquished 
by 4:00 p.m. on 
Commencement Day, 




Monday, May 27th. 



Vacation Residence. Dormitories may be occupied, 
without additional cost, during the Thanksgiving and mid-year 
vacations. 

Dormitories may be occupied during Christmas and Spring 
vacations provided that arrangements to occupy the dorms 
have been made in advance. There is a fee of $3.00 per day 
during these two vacations. 

FEES - ROOM AND BOARD 

The room and board fee of $950 is due in two 
installments, on the first day of each semester. If a student 
vacates his room, no refund of room rental is made at any time 
unless the room is re-rented to a non-resident student. If a 
student vacates his room sometime during the first semester, 
he will not be liable for a second semester room charge. 

ROOM ASSIGNMENTS 

Rooms are assigned by the Dean of Students on the basis 
of priority numbers favoring upperclassmen. 



25 



Change of Room Assignment. A student may not transfer 
his room assignment without prior conserrt of the Dean of 
Students. If a student is permitted to move he must return the 
key of the room vacated and obtain a new key for the room he 
will occupy. A $2.00 charge is made when the student changes 
rooms. 

ROOM EQUIPMENT 

If a student does not wish to use the room equipment 
provided by the College he must notify the keymaster, who 
will arrange for such piece or pieces of equipment to be 
removed to storage. The cost for each piece of equipment to 
be moved or stored is $2.00. 

College mattresses may be used only on College bedframes 
and not on the floor. 

Personal rugs and furniture must be in good condition in 
order to comply with fire and sanitary regulations. All student 
furniture must be completely portable and free standing, and 
may not be attached to the walls, ceiling, or woodwork. 

Keys. Students are expected to have keys for their rooms. 
Keys are issued by the Buildings and Grounds Office at the 
beginning of the school year. A $2.00 deposit is required at 
this time. There is a charge of $2.00 for the replacement of a 
lost key. Failure to return a key within ten days after the end 
of a semester will result in a $10.00 key and lock cyhnder 
replacement charge. 

Lamps. Study lamps can be obtained from the Buildings 
and Grounds office for a deposit of $5.00 which will be 
refunded in full when the lamp is returned. Lamps must be 
returned at the end of the school year. 

Bedboards. Bedboards are available on the same basis as 
the study lamps. 

Electrical Appliances. Only the following electrical items 
are acceptable: radio, phonograph, television, fan, electric 
razor, electric blanket, lamps, and electric iron (for use in 
laundry rooms only). 

Hot Plates. Hot plates are provided for the heating of 
coffee or soup in most dorms. No other cooking is permitted. 

Refrigerators. Refrigerators are permitted but are limited 
as to size, use, and location. All refrigerators must be 
registered in advance with the Buildings and Grounds Office. 
Specific regulations regarding the use and location of the 
refrigerators are issued when they are registered. 

College refrigerators may be rented for $15.00 per 
semester for use in Gummere, Jones, Lunt, Comfort and the 
renovated entries of Lloyd. 

Antennas. The College does not allow the installation of 
wire antennas or connections between rooms or outdoors. 

Laundry Equipment. The College provides laundry 
equipment in the basements of Barclay, Gummere and Jones. 
Irons may be borrowed from the keymaster. 

Telephones. Students may arrange to have private 
telephones installed in their rooms. A $50.00 deposit is 
required by the Bell Telephone Company. Residents of Lloyd, 
Gummere, Jones, Lunt and Comfort may use only the existing 
receptacles. 



ROOM DECORATION 

Articles may not be tacked, fastened or pasted with 
stickers to the walls, furniture, doors or fixtures. Jiffy hooks 
may be used only in those dorms without picture moldings in 
the walls. Special hangers for use in the picture moldings are 
available in the bookstore. 

PAINTING OF ROOMS 

Dormitories are painted on a regular schedule. Excessive 
damage to the painting that requires either repainting or 
washing will result in a charge to the student. Students are 
not allowed to paint their rooms. 

DAMAGES 

The resident of each room is responsible for any damage 
to his room or contents, including windows, doors, and 
furniture, whether he is present or absent when the damage 
occurs. He may notify the Buildings and Grounds Office of the 
name of the person responsible for the damage. 

Because damage assessments are made against the 
occupant of the room at the time the damage is discovered, 
students are advised to note existing damages in instances of 
room change. The new occupant of a room is advised, for his 
own protection, to report, in writing, existing damages to the 
Buildings and Grounds Office. 

All rooms have been inspected prior to occupancy in the 
fall, and existing damages noted. 

The damage policies of the Students' Association apply to 
all areas outside the student room. 

Damage Charges. Charges for damages are based on the 
actual cost of materials, direct labor, and a standard overhead 
factor. A list of common charges is available in the Buildings 
and Grounds Office. 

REPAIRS 

Faculty equipment or trouble with heat, light, or water 
and damages should be reported to the Office of Buildings and 
Grounds or to the dorm keymaster as soon as discovered. 



MAID SERVICE 

Maids will clean the room and replace the linen once per 
week. During the interim students are asked to maintain their 
room in a reasonably orderly condition. Rooms in a chaotic 
condition will not be cleaned. It is suggested that, on cleaning 
day, students clear dressers and desk tops of papers they do 
not wish to have disturbed. 

STORAGE 

The storage section of each dormitory will be open on 
certain days at the beginning and ending of the school year. 
During other times students wishing to arrange for the opening 
of storage areas should contact their keymaster. 

All stored articles must be clearly tagged with student's 
name, class year and room number. 

Graduating students, and those students leaving the 
College, are not permitted to store any articles. The College 
does not acce,pt any responsibility for loss or damage that 
might occiii: due to theft, fire, or any other cause. 



26 



FIREARMS 

Operant firearms are forbidden on the campus. 
PETS 

Live animals are strictly prohibited although aquariums 
are permissible. 

FIRE 

Tampering with fire alarm systems, fire fighting 
equipment, and the blocking of fire doors are serious offenses. 
These and other actions which constitute a hazard to the 
safety of others will result in severe disciplinary action. 

GROUNDS 

In order to preserve the beauty of the grounds, it is 
necessary to prohibit organized games in the areas surrounded 
by Lloyd, Union, Roberts, Barclay, Sharpless, Hilles, 
Gymnasium, Library, Founders, Hall Building, and Stokes 
Hall. 

SECURITY 

While every effort is made to protect the security of 
residents' rooms and storage areas, the College cannot be 
responsible for losses due to theft or other causes. It is 
strongly recommended that students' rooms be locked. Cases 
of theft should be reported immediately to the keymaster and 
to the Security Dept. 

INSPECTION 

The right and privilege is reserved to and by the College to 
enter the students' quarters at any time for the purpose of 
making inspections of the quarters and equipment, for 
enforcing the regulations contained in this handbook, or 
performing any maintenance work which is needed. 

SEIZURE 

The right and privilege is reserved to and by the College to 
seize any illegal items which are visible. The student will be 
notified by campus mail, and all confiscated items will be held 
at the Buildings and Grounds Office for 48 hours after 
notification to allow appeal. 

SEARCH 

Searches entail investigation beyond what is visible. The 
right and privilege is reserved to and by the Students' Council 
to search the students' quarters at any time. A Council 
member and a College official must be present for all searches. 



INSURANCE 

The College is not responsible, directly or indirectly, for 
loss or damage to any article of property anywhere on the 
campus due to fire, water, the elements, or action of third 
persons. It is recommended that insurance protection be 
carried by each student against loss or damage of personal 
property. The College offers fire insurance coverage on 
property of students on a blanket policy. 



341 



Application for this must be made on proper form to the 
Office of the Comptroller within the first two weeks of the 
College year. In some instances, some protection is provided 
by the policies carried by the parents on their personal 
property. Each student should consult his insurance agent for 
advice. 

DINING ROOM HOURS 



Monday through 


Breakfast 


7:30- 


8:30 


Saturday: 


Continental 








Breakfast 


8:30- 


9:45 




Lunch 


11:30- 


1:00 




Dinner 


5:15- 


6:45 


Sunday: 


Breakfast 
Continental 


8:30 


■9:15 




Breakfast 


9:15 


-9:45 




Lunch 


12:00- 


- 1:15 




Dinner 


5:15 


■6:15 



PRIVATE DINING ROOMS 

The West, East, Haverford, and Alumni Dining Rooms 
may be reserved for luncheon or dinner meetings. The Faculty 
Room may be reserved for dinner meetings only. Reservations 
should be made in advance with the food manager. 

No charge is made if the regular cafeteria service is used. A 
25c per plate surcharge is made when the regular cafeteria 
menu is to be served by waiter; charges for special menus and 
service should be discussed with the food manager. 

COOP HOURS 

The Coop is open weekdays from 9:00 to 2:00 p.m. and 
from 8:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m.; on Saturday from 8:00 a.m. 
until noon, and on Saturday evenings at hours to be 
announced. The Coop is closed on Sundays. 

REFUNDS 

Academic requirements which prevent a student from 
attending as many as three luncheons per week will entitle a 
student to receive a refund of 40 cents per meal, subject to the 
approval of the Associate Dean of the College. These refunds 
must be requested the Monday following the meals missed at 
the Comptroller's Office. 

Illness, or absence from classes for any other reason, 
which extends for a period of more than four weeks will 
entitle a student to a prorated refund. No other refunds are 
possible. 



GUEST MEAL RATES 

Breakfast 

Lunch 

Dinner 

Sunday Dinner & Steak Dinner 



.70 

.95 

1.35 

1.50 



CATERING SERVICES FOR SPECIAL FUNCTIONS 

The food service makes available catering services at 
modest rates for student social events. Arrangements should be 
made well in advance of the event with the food manager, who 
will also aid in planning for use of facilities, equipment, and 
food services. 



27 



SPECIAL DIET SERVICE 



BRYN MAWR AND HAVERFORD BUS SCHEDULE 



A student requiring a special diet should obtain a letter 
from his physician and present this to the Food Manager, who 
will make all arrangements. 

DINING ROOM EQUIPMENT 

Certain Dining Room equipment may be borrowed by 
students by contacting the food manager. Unless prior 
arrangements have been made, however, no equipment may be 
removed from the Dining Room. A charge of $1.00 is made 
for each article of equipment found in students' rooms. 

BRYN MAWR-HAVERFORD MEAL EXCHANGE 

Students with Bryn Mawr class schedules that make it 
difficult to return to Haverford for lunch can, by prior 
arrangement, take their lunch at Bryn Mawr. Tickets for Bryn 
Mawr meals should be obtained from the Haverford food 
manager. 

Weekend meal exchanges may also be arranged on a 
limited basis by the Dining Room Committee. 

DINING ROOM DRESS 

Students are asked to help maintain a pleasant atmosphere 
in the dining room by wearing suitable attire. Gym suits, short 
shorts and bare feet are therefore not permitted. 

DINING ROOM CONDUCT 

Excessive noise or lack of consideration by a few can 
quickly destroy the pleasure of mealtime for many others. 
Minor incidents of undesirable conduct will result in expulsion 
from the dining room for a specified period of time without 
any refund of board fees. 

COMPLAINTS, SUGGESTIONS, IMPROVEMENTS 

The food service, in all its aspects, is solely intended to 
serve the students. It is therefore important that the food 
manager hear from students about their likes, dislikes, and 
suggestions for improvements. 

The Dining Room Committee is the primary vehicle for 
receiving and transmitting student comments about food 
service. The Dining Room manager, however, is always 
available to discuss these matters firsthand with the students. 



VII. Student Services 

'"We must all 

work,' said Mr. McKenna, sententiously . 

'Yes, ' said Mr. Dooley, 'or be 

wurruked.' " 
-Finley Peter Dunne 




The two colleges jointly operate a bus to faciliatate 
cooperative classes, lectures,and library use. The bus makes 
regular trips between the two campuses on weekdays when 
classes are in session. The bus leaves from the Infirmary at 
Haverford, and from Pembroke Arch at Bryn Mawr. 
Leave Bryn Mawr Leave Haverford 

8:15 a.m. 8:45 a.m. 

9:15 a.m. 9:45 a.m. 

10:15 a.m. 10:45 a.m. 

11:15 a.m. 11:45 a.m. 

12:15 p.m. 12:45 p.m. 

1:15 p.m. 1:45 p.m. 

2:15 p.m. 2:45 p.m. 

3:15 p.m. 3:45 p.m. 

4:15 p.m. 4:45 p.m. 

5:15 p.m. 5:45 p.m. 

7:15 p.m. 7:45 p.m. 



9:45 p.m. 



10:15 p.m. 



28 



10:30 p.m. 10:45 p.m. 

(Wed. only) (Wed. only) 

The bus may be chartered by student groups on weekends 
at the rate of $3.00 per hour and 35 cents per mile, 
provided a regular college driver is available. There is a 
minmimum charge of $20.00. 

INFIRMARY 

The dispensary is open from 8:00 to 10:00 a.m., 1:00 to 
3:00 p.m., and 6:30 to 8:00 p.m. Monday through Saturday; 
and Sundays 10:00 to 11:00 a.m.; for routine office calls. 
Emergencies will be taken care of at any time. 

The College physician is available at the infirmary from 
2:00 to 3:00 p.m. Monday througli Friday and will be called 
by the nurse on duty if needed at other times. 

Visiting hours for patients in the infirmary are between 
2:00 and 4:00 p.m., and 6:00 and 8:00 p.m. daily. 

Emergency phone nights and weekends is MI2-3I33. The 
infirmary is closed during vacations. 

COUNSELING SERVICES 

The College offers counseling for problems of a personal, 
educational, or vocational nature. Students are encouraged to 
make an appointment with any one of the counselors for an 
evaluation. He will usually be advised by the person he 
consults. Wlien a problem warrants it, he may be referred to 
another member of the staff, or occasionally to an outside 
source for further help. 

All student communications with the counseling staff are 
held in strict professional confidence, as are the names of 
students counseled. 

The counseling staff consists of aspsychiatrist. Dr. Peter 
Bennett, and two clinical psychologists, Mrs. Judith Katz and 
Mr. James Vaughan. Appointments with Dr. Bennett should be 
made with the nurse at the Infirmary. Appointments with Mrs. 
Katz and Mr. Vaughan should be made at their offices in the 
ground floor of Hall Building. 



PSYCHOLOGICAL TESTING 

The records of the psychological tests which each student 
takes during Customs Week are available in the Counseling 



Offices. Any student desiring an explanation of them may ask 
for an appointment with either Mrs. Katz or Mr. Vaughan. 

Students who desire counseling in regard to majors or 
vocational plans may ask to take supplementary tests of 
aptitudes, interests, or personality. 

FINANCIAL AID 

Scholarships. All scholarships for the current year have 
been previously awarded. Applications for renewal of 
scholarships for 1969-70 will be sent to students early in the 
second semester. Students expecting to receive aid for the first 
time in 1969-70 should see Mr. Ambler before March 15, 
1969. 

Student Loans. A loan fund is available for deserving 
students who may require financial assistance during their 
college course. Students wishing loan information should see 
Mr. Ambler. 

Summer Employment. The Dean of Students' Office 
maintains a central listing of summer job opportunities. 

Term Time Employment. There are several opportunities 
for student employment in the Library, as clerical assistants 
for faculty and administrative officers, as research aids, and in 
the Dining Room. In most instances, prior consideration is 
given to students with financial need. Students interested in 
campus employment should register in the Dean of Students' 
Office. 



Corps or VISTA are invited to discuss their interests with Mr. 
Lyons who serves as the campus liaison officer for these 
organizations. 

GRADUATE SCHOOL CATALOGS 

The catalogs of most colleges and universities in the 
United States are available for loan from the Registrar's Office. 

STUDY ABROAD 

A student who is interested in studying abroad should 
consult the Associate Dean of the College. Up-to-date 
information on study in foreign universities is maintained in 
his office in Founders Hall. 

READING AND STUDY PROGRAM 

A special reading and study skills program is offered by 
the College for a four-week period during the Fall semester. 
Students who have not had special reading and study 
instruction or guidance are urged to consider this program, 
since most students have found it possible to develop their 
reading and study skills considerably beyond their present 
levels. A special fee of $80.00 is charged for the program. 

In addition to this special program, the College counselors 
are available for individual consultation. 



GUESTS - WEEKEND DATES 



PLACEMENT SERVICES 

Haverford's placement service is under the direction of the 
Director of Alumni Affairs. A list of positions open in 
business, government and institutions is maintained in the 
Alumni Office. Interviews with representatives of business 
concerns, government agencies and institutions can be 
arranged. Students planning to go to graduate schools are 
guided by members of the administration and faculty 
appointed to provide advice and information in these areas: 
business administration, education, engineering, law, medicine 
and theology. Students planning to do graduate work in a 
departmental subject should consult with the chairman of the 
department at Haverford. 

GRADUATE SCHOOL INFORMATION 

Students planning to go to professional schools may seek 

advice and information from appropriate faculty members as 

follows: 

Business Administration Mr. Teaf 

Education Mr. Lyons 

Engineering Mr. Hetzel 

Law Mr. Lane 

Medicine Mr. Santer 

Theology Mr. Spiegler 

Students planning to do graduate work in a departmental 

subject should consult with the chairman of the department at 

Haverford. 

PEACE CORPS AND VISTA INFORMATION 

Students interested in applying for service in the Peace 



On festive weekends, a representative of the Students' 
Council arranges for rooms in faculty homes and at Bryn 
Mawr for students' out-of-town dates. The faculty do not 
except remuneration for this service, but students should 
observe the following suggestions: 

1. The faculty hostess should be contacted as soon as 
possible. She should be given the name and home address of 
the girl who is expected to stay with her, and the approximate 
times of her arrival and departure. 

2. The hostess should be kept informed of any changes in 
the girl's plans. 

3. Thank-you notes are appreciated. 

LOST AND FOUND 

Items lost or found should be reported to the Buildings 
and Grounds office. This office periodically posts lists of lost 
and found items. Items beheved stolen should be reported 
either to the Security Officer or to the dorm keymaster. 

VENDING MACHINES 

Candy and soft drink machines are located in the Union, 
Barclay, Gummere, Jones, and Leeds basements. Should any 
machine fail to operate properly, or should money be lost in 
the machine, the matter should be promptly reported to the 
Business Office. Prompt refunds of lost money are given. 

MEETING ROOMS 

The Council Room in the Union is available for meetings 
of campus organizations when not in use by the Students' 
Council. Other meeting rooms can be reserved in the Dean of 
Students' Office. 



29 



341 



CONCESSIONS 

Each year the Students" Council awards certain selling 
concessions to students. Except by special permit, no other 
soliciting or selling is allowed on campus. Generally, student 
concessions are allowed only for items not made available by 
the Book Store and the Coop. Any student may start a new 
concession by applying to the Council Secretary. 

BOOKSTORE 

The book store, located in the Union, is open from 10:00 
to 4:00 p.m. Monday through Friday. Extended hours are 
announced during the beginning of each semester. 

ACCIDENT INSURANCE 

Every student is covered by a blanket accident policy paid 
for from the unit fee. This insurance pays actual expenses 
resulting from any accident up to a limit of $1000 for each 
accident. All claims under this policy should be directed to the 
College physician. 

NOTARY PUBLIC 

A Notary Public is provided for the convenience of 
students in the Comptroller's Office and in the Registrar's 
office. 

CALENDAR OF EVENTS 

The central Calendar of Events is maintained in the Office 
of the Dean of Students. All campus extra-curricular activities 
are registered in this office. A Calendar of Events is published 
weekly by the Students' Council and distributed throughout 
the campus. 

SELECTIVE SERVICE 

Students are required by law to register for Selective 
Service on or within five days after their 18th birthday. This 
may be done through the Dean of Students. In order that the 
proper forms may be sent to the Selective Service each year, 
each student should notify the Registrar of his Selective 
Service number and address of his local Selective Service 
Board. The forms sent by the College verify the student's 
eligibility for deferment. 

Students who intend to be conscientious objectors are 
invited to consult with Professor Cary or Mr. James Vaughan. 

Materials and counsel about the Selective Service Laws 
and Regulations are available from Deans Lyons and Potter. 

ART RENTAL 

The College has a collection of framed prints which are 
rented to students at a very nominal rate. Announcements will 
be made in the fall about when students may make selections 
from this collection. 

CHECK CASHING 

The cashier's window, located on the second floor of 
Hilles,^ is open to cash student checks from 10:15 a.m. to 
1 1 :45 a.m. Monday through Friday. 

MUSIC PRACTICE 

Practice rooms and pianos are available for students' vocal 



or instrumental practice. Interested students should contact 
Dr. Reese, the chairman of the Music Department. 



VIII. Social Life 
and Other Necessities 



"Persons attempting 
to find a motive in this narra- 
tive ii'ill be prosecuted; persons 
attempting to find a moral in 
it will he banished; persons 
attempting to find a plot in it 
will he shot. " 
-Mark Twain 




COLLEGE TELEPHONE SERVICE 

The College switchboard (Midway 9-9600). which is open 
from 9:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M. daily and from 9:00 A.M. to 
12:30 P.M. on Saturdays, can contact all offices and other 
locations on campus. 

In addition, there are several pay phones on campus. All 
are in the Midway exchange. The locations and numbers are 

listed below. Barclay - first floor 2-9524 

Barclay - third floor 2-9506 

Biology Dept. - Sharpless 2-9639 

Drinker Music Center 2-9521 

Field House 9-9730 

Founders Hall 2-9460 

French House 2-9613 

Kitchen 2-9544 

Power House 2-9540 

Psychology Dept. - Sharpless 2-9626 

Stokes Hall : 2-9591 

Union Building ". 2-9514 

Williams House 2-9428 

INFIRMARY EMERGENCY (Day) 9-9600 

INFIRMARY EMERGENCY (After 5 P.M.) 2-3133 



30 



BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 



"Enflamed with 
the study of learning and the admir- 
ation of virtue." 
-John Milton 



Bryn Mawr students are not assigned to dormitories by 
classes. A girl may sign out on any night until 12:30 A.M. 
without an escort and until 2:00 A.M. with an escort. On 
"festive" Haverford weekends, the signout hour is extended to 
3:30 A.M. In addition, it is possible for a girl to sign out until 
8:00 A.M. A girl who is signing out must provide her escort's 
name and their destination. 

Switchboards at Bryn Mawr are turned off at 12:30 A.M. 
All telephones are in the LAwrence exchange. 

Denbigh Hall 5-8500 

Erdman Hall 7-1450 

Merion Hall 5-2225 

Pembroke East 5-2800 

Pembroke West 5-2800 

Radnor Hall 7-0323 

Rhoads North 5-3544 

Rhoads South 5-3544 

Rockefeller Hall 5-5420 

French House 5-91 83 

German (Batten) House 5-9396 

Spanish (Perry) House 5-9050 

The Inn (students) 5-9062 

Rockefeller Annex 5-9497 

Graduate Center 5-1473 

Non-Resident Room, Erdman 5-9329 

Infirmary (students) 5-9152 



Fourth floor LA 5-9092 

Pennswood Hall 

First floor LA 5-9019 

First floor LA 5-9547 

Second floor LA 5-9470 

Second floor LA 5-9335 

Third floor LA 5-9467 

Third floor LA 5-9546 

Latham Hall LA 5-9480 



ROSEMONT COLLEGE 

"Get thee to a nunnery!" 
-William Shakespeare 

Connelly Hall 

First floor LA 5-9146 

Second floor LA 5-9264 

Third floor LA 5-9082 

Hefferman Hall 

First floor LA 5-9070 

Second floor LA 5-9286 

Third floor LA 5-9380 

Kaul Hall 

First floor LA 5-9034 

Second floor LA 5-901 8 

Third floor LA 5-9028 

Mayfield Hall 

First floor LA 5-9315 

Second floor LA 5-9238 

Third floor LA 5-91 20 

Infirmary LA 5-9058 



HARCUM JUNIOR COLLEGE 



"Every day 's a holiday, 
And every night is a Saturday night. " 

-Bobby Rydell 



Nursery School LA 5-4100 

Hatcher Hall 

First floor LA 5-9240 

Second floor LA 5-91 29 

Klein Hall 

First floor LA 5-941 5 

Second floor LA 5-9420 

Second floor LA 5-941 6 

Third floor LA 5-9425 

Third floor LA 5-9418 

Third floor LA 5-9224 

Melville Hall 

Second floor LA 5-9056 

Second floor LA 5-9294 

Third floor LA 5-9054 

Third floor LA 5-9299 

Montgomery Hall 

First floor LA 5-9200 

First floor LA 5-91 92 

Second floor LA 5-9331 

Third floor LA 5-9271 



MISCELLANEOUS ESSENTIAL TELEPHONE 
NUMBERS 



Academy of Music Ticket Office PE 5-7378 

Ardmore Beverage MI 2-7824 

Ardmore Cab MI 2-4616 

Ardmore Recreation Centre MI 2-3953 

Ardmore Theatre MI 2-2000 

Bryn Mawr Beverage LA 8-5472 

Bryn Mawr Taxi LA 5-0513 

Bryn Mawr Theatre LA 5-2662 

Dial-A-Score 263-6400 

Eric Theatre (Wynnewood) MI 9-5252 

Main Point LA 5-3375 

or 

LA 5-9596 

Pizzi's Pizzeria LA 5-481 1 

Popeye's Pizzeria LA 5-9140 

Spectrum 

Broad and Pattison Ticket Office FU 9-5000 

In-Town Ticket Office (15 and Locust) KI 6-0702 

Suburban Theatre MI 2-4747 



31 



INDEX 



Page 

Academic Flexibility 17 

Academic Flexibility Committee 3 

Academic Standing Committee 3 

Accident Insurance 30 

A.I.E.S.E.C 4 

Art Rental 30 

Art Series Committee 2 

Athletic Awards 19 

Athletics 19 

Attendance At Classes 17 

Attendance at Collection 17 

Big Brother Committee 1 

Bookstore 30 

Brass Ensemble 4 

Bryn Mawr College Telephones 31 

Bryn Mawr-Haverford Committee on Bi-College 

Cooperation 1 

Bryn Mawr-Haverford Meal Exchange 28 

Bus Schedule 28 

Calendar of Events 30 

Campus Guidelines 14 

Campus Organizations 4 

Catering Services For Special Functions 27 

Change of Home Address 18 

Check Cashing 30 

Chess Club 4 

Class Night Committee 3 

Code Of Student Responsibility 14 

Collection Committee 3 

College Orchestral Activities 4 

College Telephone Service 30 

Colloquia Committee 2 

Committee On Academic Standing 17 

Complaints, Suggestions, Improvements 28 

Concessions 30 

Constitution of the Students' Association 

Of Haverford College 5 

Controversial Subjects 15 

Coop Hours 27 

Counseling Services 28 

Course Evaluation Committee 2 

Cultural Committee 3 

Customs Committee 2 

Damages 16 

Damages To Rooms 26 

Departmental Libraries 24 

Dining Room Conduct 28 

EHning Room Dress 28 

Dining Room Equipment 28 

Dining Room Hours 27 

Disciplinary Actions 14 

Distinguished Visitors And Library Committee 3 

Drama Club 4 

Drinking 14 

Dropped Courses 17 

E>rugs 14 

Educational Policy And Admissions Committee 3 

Expansion Committee 2 

Failed Courses 16 

Fees— Room And Board 25 

Final Examinations Committee 2 

Financial Aid 29 

Fire ' 27 

Firearms 27 

Food Committee 2 

Founders Club 4 

Gambling 18 

Glee Club 4 

Grading Procedures 17 

Graduate School Catalogs 29 

Graduate School Information 29 

Grounds 27 

Guest Meal Rates 27 

Guests-Weekend Dates 29 

Guide To The Haverford Library 20 

Handbook Committee 2 

Harcum Junior College Telephones 31 

Haverford— Bryn Mawr SDS 5 

Haverford College Varsity Marching Society 

And Auxiliary Fife, Drum, and Kazoo Corps 4 

Haverford News, The 4 

Honors And Fellowship Committees 4 

Honor System 11 

Honor System Committee 2 

Honor System, Reviewed and Reaffirmed, February 1968 13 



Infirmary 28 

Inspection 27 

Insurance 27 

Intercollegiate Eligibility .- 19 

Interlibrary Loan and Use Of Other Libraries 24 

Intramural Athletics 20 

Library-Book Location 21 

Library Floor Plan 22, 23 

Library Hours 21 

Library Rules 25 

Little Tlieatre 4 

Lost And Found 29 

Maid Service 26 

Major Field Of Study 17 

Meeting Rooms 29 

Minimum Levels For Promotion 16 

Miscellaneous Telephone Numbers . . ' 31 

Modern Dance Club 4 

Motor Vehicle Regulations 18 

Music Practice 30 

Nature And Purpose of Fifth Day Meeting 16 

Newly Proposed Constitution of the Students' 

Association Of Haverford College 8 

Non-Academic Program Committee 4 

Notary Public 30 

Occupancy Schedule 25 

O.I.M.G 5 

Peace Corps And VISTA 29 

Pets 27 

Phi Beta Kappa (Honorary) 5 

Physical Education Requirements 19 

Placement Services 29 

Private Dining Rooms 27 

Psychological Testing 28 

Reading And Study Program 29 

RECORD 5 

Refunds 27 

Registration Of Campus Events 18 

Registration Requirements 20 

Registration Schedule 20 

Relationship With Law Enforcement Agencies 15 

Reorganization Committee 2 

Repairs 26 

Requirements For Physical Education 20 

Residence Halls And Food Services 25 

Residence Requirements 16 

REVUE 5 

Room Assignments 25 

Room Decoration 26 

Room Equipment 26 

Rosemont College Telephones 31 

Sailing Club 5 

Schuetz Singers 5 

Search 27 

Security 27 

Seizure 27 

Selective Service 30 

Selling, Soliciting, Peddling 18 

Service Fund Committee 2 

Social Action Committee 5 

Social Committee 2 

Social Life-Telephones 30 

Special Diet Service 28 

Storage 26 

Student Chamber Group 

Student Government And Organizations , 

Students' Association , 

Students' Council , 

Students' Council Committees , 

Students' Council Memorandum About Drugs, April 1968 15 

Student Services 28 

Students On Faculty Committees 3 

Study Abroad 29 

Swimming Tests 19 

Telephone, Haverford College 31 

Term Paper Deadlines 17 

Triangle And Beta Rho Sigma (Alumni Social) 5 

Use Of The College's Name 18 

Varsity Club 5 

Varsity Team Captains 19 

Vending Machines 29 

WHRC 5 



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